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Scientific Consensus on Brain Fingerprinting

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posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 03:28 AM
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I came across this article concerning the future development of crime detection. A key player in this is one Lawrence A. Farwell, PhD Chairman and Chief Scientist and who is pioneer of Brain Fingerprinting® technology.

The document concerns with arguing and determining the validation of active application of such technology in modern society.


The most fundamental point of consensus among scientists and other relevant experts regarding brain fingerprinting, forensic science, and science in general is that different methods produce different results. Brain fingerprinting, from the seminal Farwell and Donchin (1986; 1991) and Farwell and Smith (2001) papers to the present, has never produced an error, neither a false negative nor a false positive. Some alternative methods of applying the same brain responses in attempts to detect concealed information have resulted in 10% to 15% errors and in some cases as high as nearly 50% errors, no better than chance. Even some purported “replications” of Farwell and Donchin have in fact used fundamentally different methods. Consequently they have failed to achieve accuracy approaching that of brain fingerprinting and, unlike brain fingerprinting, are susceptible to countermeasures. These fundamental differences in scientific methods are the reason why brain fingerprinting has been successfully applied in the field and ruled admissible in court, and these alternative methods are unsuitable for field use or application in the criminal justice system or national security.

In developing this consensus, we have specified precisely the standard scientific methods that constitute brain fingerprinting and attempted to identify the specific standards that are necessary and sufficient to obtain the results that brain fingerprinting has consistently attained. We have sought to identify differences in methods that are responsible for the widely divergent results obtained in different laboratories conducting related research.

Scientific Consensus on Brain Fingerprinting
and Differing Views on the Science, Technology, and Application




posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 04:08 AM
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Pretty interesting...

I didn't wade thru all of it, but in essence...

They hook the subject up to a brain monitor and then expose him to stimuli (like a murder weapon, or
false murder weapon). Then judging (somehow) by the subject's response, the researcher can tell if
the subject has salient knowledge, or no knowledge...

It's a fancy type of lie detector, except it doesn't detect lies, it detects knowledge.

Ostensibly, (I assume) this device can discern (when you are thinking about a crime) whether
you have actual knowledge, or possess no actual knowledge...

Personally, I would just say, "No thanks...I don't feel like being probed or questioned."



posted on Jun, 26 2012 @ 02:09 PM
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At the moment it has limited application, I agree. But over the decades it will be improved upon that I am sure of and as always with new toys to play with it will be over used and abused to the point of absurdity. If the TSA gets hold of it they can discard with the pat downs and just scan your brain to determine your guilt or not. It will be quite safe and painless, quick and easy. Just call mind rape.



 
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