It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Accessing a well when the power is off

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 04:26 PM
link   
Not too long ago, we had a power outage at the ranch for a few hours.
Not a big deal, although the loss of any water was kind of a nuisance.
it got me thinking though, in a SHTF scenario, kind of sucks to have a well, but not have access to it, if the power is out. (as like most, I have an electric well pump).

Found this link though. Rather ingenious solution, and simple to do.

www.countrysidemag.com...


The hand pump [in Figure 1] is as simple as a paper clip — and just as ingenius. Just buy the parts, put them together, and start pumping! It took us about 20 minutes to put one together — and it cost less than $20.


another, less DIY option:

countrylife.lehmans.com...
edit on 19-6-2012 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 04:45 PM
link   
What sort of electric pump do you have? Three of the most common principles of operation are siphon, piston, and rotary impeller.

If your well is less than about 40 ft. The easiest way is probably keeping a siphon handy, with a little accordion pump at the top.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 04:52 PM
link   
I'm sure it's less than that, we're in FL.


I haven't really taken it apart enough yet to see, just learning most of it.
Still, just need to learn all these things. Thanks for the advice.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 04:55 PM
link   
Windmills use to be the norm for pumping water and still a few around. But not as many as once was with that oil thing taking hold and really changed things.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 05:02 PM
link   
reply to post by Gazrok
 


Here is a vid showing how to put together a simple pump made out of pvc tubing and using marbles as check valves.




posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 05:18 PM
link   
reply to post by Gazrok
 

If you don't have access to a hand pump there are other options. As long as your leathers are good you can lift the pump off the top of your well casing ( a two person job, but my husband and I have done it) and cut the pipe that goes from the pump down into the well casing (make sure you put a couple of good size wrenches on the pipe so that just in case your leathers aren't good the pipe doesn't fall into the well- make sure they are tight). You can then hand pump the pipe up and down and water will come up. Bring buckets to catch the water and be prepared to get wet but it works.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 07:00 PM
link   
Would it be possible to put a "T" at the top of your well pipe with a couple of gate valves? One side with the electric pump and one side with a hand pump.



posted on Jun, 19 2012 @ 08:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Gazrok
 


I've looked at my pump, and I think I could rig a back wheel of a bicycle to operate the pump without having to use electricity. Might take me a few hours to make it operational, but once it was hooked up, we could take turns riding long enough to build up pressure in the well tank. I've also considered getting rid of the pressurized tank and making an elevated cistern instead. If the power was out long-term, I would probably switch to the cistern.

Also, my well water would only be for drinking, we could use the pool and pond water for bathing and washing dishes.

Speaking of Florida water, our Lake Jackson is totally drained out to the last drop now. This hasn't happened in about 50 years or more, and I'm not sure it has ever been 100% dry. The weird thing is we had 10 straight days with heavy rains right before the bottom dropped out of the lake? I've also noticed a bunch of smaller ponds completely dry. My runoff pond is still at average levels, but the aquifer must be at a record low. I'm going to post a thread about Lake Jackson in a little bit, it is bizarre.



posted on Jun, 20 2012 @ 09:10 AM
link   
reply to post by getreadyalready
 


Around here, most blame it on all the farmers who pumped water out like crazy to freeze the crops a couple of winters ago...a lot more sinkholes, etc. Sucks to hear about your lake.

Thanks for the advice all. I think having an emergency hand pump is the way to go. We're looking at diesel generators too, not as a long term solution for this, but more as a short term solution for power in general (as having no AC in FL sucks, if the power is out).



posted on Jun, 22 2012 @ 10:43 PM
link   
I'm on "city water", as are my siblings. My parents have a well with an electric pump, and the well is over 900 feet deep.

My best bet would be my inlaws shallow well on their farm, which is a about half a mile away from where I live. I'd probably head there...



posted on Jun, 25 2012 @ 05:14 AM
link   
Pumps shmumps, boohoo the powers off and my well pump wont work, whatever shall I do?

get a rope and bucket like the ancestors used to do with.



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join