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Any ideas on what this is near the sun?

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posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:06 AM
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Downloaded these on the timestamped date. I was never to the SOHO site before and was just poking around. I'm not even sure how to navigate back to them to see if they're still there.


The first image shows the object in question (top right hand corner), the day before. It's then much larger on the day I actually downloaded them.

Not sure how to insert the pics directly into the post. I tried using the image link tool, but the preview said "image removed".

Well anyway I thought this was something quite unusual and worthy of some discussion here.


i116.photobucket.com...

i116.photobucket.com...

i116.photobucket.com...

i116.photobucket.com...

i116.photobucket.com...




posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:39 AM
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Very interesting. Whatever it is, it's MASSIVE!



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:55 AM
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Could be a comet. They are always flying around or into the sun.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 01:20 AM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 


Nice. If this hasnt been posted yet, and the pictures aren't photo shopped you have something nice here. ( not saying you faked them) But if its real wouldn't a comet have a more direct impact trajectory?



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 07:10 AM
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It's the spaceship from "Prometheus".

It just hit the USA on Friday.

The aliens will be coming soon.


BTW, it was a decent movie.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 08:40 AM
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Originally posted by coven83
reply to post by Bilk22
 


Nice. If this hasnt been posted yet, and the pictures aren't photo shopped you have something nice here. ( not saying you faked them) But if its real wouldn't a comet have a more direct impact trajectory?


Well they're not photo shopped. I just cropped those sections to enlarge the object as it just appears as a small spec on the originals. Doesn't really look like a comet, or should I say what I would expect one to look like since I've never seen one before. I've seen pics on the net of comets but they look different. Maybe it's that SOHO camera and the type of filter?

Can anyone navigate back to them? As I said before, I was just clicking around the database, but I forget which filter I used and not sure where to look.
edit on 9-6-2012 by Bilk22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 10:54 AM
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I think pics like this have been posted before. It is always in this same spot, and I believe that it is a piece of lint on the SOHO camera. I know there are threads about it. Do not have the time to look them up right now, but it should be a simple search..

I believe this is one of the THREADS.
LINK
edit on 6/9/2012 by VeniVidi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by VeniVidi
I think pics like this have been posted before. It is always in this same spot, and I believe that it is a piece of lint on the SOHO camera. I know there are threads about it. Do not have the time to look them up right now, but it should be a simple search..

I believe this is one of the THREADS.
LINK
edit on 6/9/2012 by VeniVidi because: (no reason given)


They're obviously not the same. The pics I posted are of images taken hours apart. The object is the same, yet smaller in the first vs the second. If it were as you stated, it would appear the same in both. It's why I exploded the view of both. To display it in terms of progression. From small to larger. It's also reflecting light. The light isn't passing through it or creating a shadow, which would be the result, if it were as you suggested, lint on the lens.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 11:09 AM
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I'm sure there's folks who post or visit this forum who have the ability and the know how to search the SOHO archives to see if these are still in the data base and could then use the various analytical tools, either on the SOHO site or utilizing photography software, to enhance the image for better study. I just don't have that capability or know how.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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hi my name is phage this is a lense flare nothing else exists besides money and bought and paid for science.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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It is nothing near the Sun.
They are the result of cosmic rays striking the CCD sensor. This has been explained in the many, many threads about "things" near the Sun.

edit on 6/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
It is nothing near the Sun.
They are the result of cosmic rays striking the CCD sensor. This has been explained in the many, many threads about "things" near the Sun.

edit on 6/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Ah I see. Cosmic rays. Can you explain what I questioned? Why is the object smaller, appearing farther from the sun in the fist and larger and closer to the sun in the second, if it indeed were something on the lens/sensor? Shouldn't it always appear and look the same? Your explanation doesn't make sense.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 

Your claim doesn't make sense. Why do you think it's closer or farther from the Sun? Just because it's larger or smaller? Why do you think it is anywhere near the Sun?

Not all cosmic rays are the same. Not all cosmic rays strike the sensor at the same angle.

Tell me, what do you think about this image taken during a particle storm?


edit on 6/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


That looks nothing like what I posted. So you're claiming that was a singular "particle" (what ever they are) in my pics? The object was captured hours apart. One smaller and then the next larger. Please explain.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 

A cosmic ray is a nuclear particle which is moving through space with a great deal of speed. Because it has a great deal of speed it has a great deal of energy. When one of these particles strikes the sensor of the EIT instrument it transfers that energy to the pixels which it encounters. That energy causes the pixels to "light up".

If the particle strikes perpendicular to the sensor a few pixels in a cluster will be affected and a "spot" will appear. If the particle strikes the sensor at an angle a streak will appear as the particle moves across the CCD. The length of the streak will depend on the angle and the amount of energy carried by the particle.



edit on 6/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 6/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:32 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Bilk22
 

A cosmic ray is a nuclear particle which is moving through space with a great deal of speed. Because it has a great deal of speed it has a great deal of energy. When one of these particles strikes the sensor of the EIT instrument it transfers that energy to the pixels which it encounters. That energy causes the pixels to "light up".

If the particle strikes perpendicular to the sensor a few pixels in a cluster will be affected and a "spot" will appear. If the particle strikes the sensor at an angle a streak will appear as the particle moves across the CCD. The length of the streak will depend on the angle and the amount of energy carried by the particle.


So let me see if I understand this. Is the particle visible before striking the sensor? If not then how do you explain the two images? Using your explanation it would be a singular event. One particle exhibited on one frame image taken by the sensor. Does the sensor have the capability of capturing images faster than the speed of light? Wouldn't that be necessary for one particle to be captured multiple times?



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Bilk22
 

A cosmic ray is a nuclear particle which is moving through space with a great deal of speed. Because it has a great deal of speed it has a great deal of energy. When one of these particles strikes the sensor of the EIT instrument it transfers that energy to the pixels which it encounters. That energy causes the pixels to "light up".

If the particle strikes perpendicular to the sensor a few pixels in a cluster will be affected and a "spot" will appear. If the particle strikes the sensor at an angle a streak will appear as the particle moves across the CCD. The length of the streak will depend on the angle and the amount of energy carried by the particle.



edit on 6/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 6/9/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Before your last edit, you asked if I saw that the particle wasn't in the images between the ones I posted. Where do I find that info? Oh and why did you edit that question out of your post?



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 


Is the particle visible before striking the sensor?

No.


If not then how do you explain the two images? Using your explanation it would be a singular event.

No. It is two separate events. Cosmic ray strikes are random events. Did you notice that your "object" does not appear on the two frames in between the ones you posted?


Does the sensor have the capability of capturing images faster than the speed of light?

I don't understand what you mean. The particle does not move at the speed of light. It excites pixels of the sensor as it moves through them.



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:38 PM
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reply to post by Bilk22
 

I edited it because of your more recent post. It seemed appropriate to put it in my response to that.
You can search the image database here:
sohodata.nascom.nasa.gov...



posted on Jun, 9 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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i often see these things on EIT pics. i'm not qualified to definitively identify them, but i find some of them interesting;



same closeups in an animated gif;





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