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Daytime constelations

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posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:42 PM
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So first off I used the wonderful search engine and did not find anything so if this has been asked before a polite answer is sufficient not a rip my head off your an idiot use the search feature reply. Moving on having a conversation with a friend a while back we were looking at the stars at dusk and we started talking about what the constellations are you can see at night. Now when it is daylight out you can't see any. So if we could see the stars in daylight what constellations would we be seeing exactly?




posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:46 PM
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reply to post by w810i
 

There are a lot of constellations so saying "exactly" which ones you would see is a little tricky.

How about this; all of the constellations which will be visible in the night sky in 6 months would be visible in the day sky now.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:48 PM
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reply to post by w810i
 


Well , in the summer you see the winters " day time constellation " and in the winter you see the summers " day time constellation " .



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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Sorry for the odd wording in the opening post. How it sounded in my head and how it came out.. not the same lol..So I guess a better question would be if I could see the stars during day time hours would I be seeing what the other side of the globe saw during their night time?
edit on 30-5-2012 by w810i because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by w810i
 

No. You're on the other side of the Earth.
Everybody on Earth sees the same stars at night at the same time of year...with slight adjustments for being in the northern or southern hemisphere.

edit on 5/30/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:54 PM
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Ok..so with the earth rotating and the sun and the solar system orbiting the milky way itself would it be a region of space not seen in a long time?
edit on 30-5-2012 by w810i because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by w810i
 


No you would be seeing the opposit seasons day time constellation



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:59 PM
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reply to post by w810i
 

Every six months...with some overlap. So no...not a "long time".

edit on 5/30/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 08:59 PM
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Originally posted by Max_TO
reply to post by w810i
 


No you would be seeing the opposit seasons day time constellation


So in summer if you could see the stars during the daytime you would be seeing what you would normally see on a winter night and vice versa then?



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 09:00 PM
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Hey mate download a program called stellarium. Shows you what is in the sky at any given time. You can even see whats up there during the day by turning off the atmosphere. Its a free program btw.
edit on 30-5-2012 by Boomstix because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 09:08 PM
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Thanks for the answers guys to my question. Appreciate it.



posted on May, 30 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by w810i
 


Yep



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by Boomstix
Hey mate download a program called stellarium. Shows you what is in the sky at any given time. You can even see whats up there during the day by turning off the atmosphere. Its a free program btw.
edit on 30-5-2012 by Boomstix because: (no reason given)


Or if you have an Android phone download Google Sky (free) or an iphone/ipad Starwalk HD (have to pay)



posted on May, 31 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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This graphic might be helpful:

Image Source

Orion can be seen in the winter, because the night side of the earth faces toward Orion in the winter. As Phage mentioned above, everyone will be able to see Orion during the night in the winter as the earth rotates, and people on the day side rotate into night to face the direction of Orion.

In the Summer, the view toward Orion would be from the sunlit side of the Earth -- and thus Orion would be obscured by daylight. The nightime side would be pointed toward Scorpius. Everyone will be able to see Scorpius at night during the summer as the daytime side rotates to face in the direction of Scorpius at night.


edit on 5/31/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



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