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LED lights , Could they also be used as EYES??

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posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:11 PM
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Got to pondering this last night,. bear with me..

In the new age of LED., all the led screens (plasma too) people have said that a Pixel CAN be used in both directions. . projecting an image forward, or, receiving an image like an EYE..
those are the guys that say our TV's are watching US !
OK
So every one has lots of LED light upgrade;. With the new Data over electric wires, the new Smart meters and all

Would it be to far fetched to think just maybe "every led light upgrade in the house could now be an EYE " !
Camera?? .




posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:14 PM
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Originally posted by hbarker
In the new age of LED., all the led screens (plasma too) people have said that a Pixel CAN be used in both directions. . projecting an image forward, or, receiving an image like an EYE..



No.
Not true.
I could add more text here, but I'd be wasting my time since the whole premise of the argument is still wrong, false, not true and wrong and not true and also false. (and wrong)
And not true.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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Uh what?

A LED is a light emitter ONLY. The term even means Light Emitting Diode.

Its physically impossible for a LED to be used as a photoreactive reciever. There are components that can, but not LED's.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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You would still need lense infront of the LED's to focus the picture, if your TV comes with a giant lense attached to the front then I would get worried, until then...



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:27 PM
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Originally posted by BMorris
Uh what?

A LED is a light emitter ONLY. The term even means Light Emitting Diode.

Its physically impossible for a LED to be used as a photoreactive reciever. There are components that can, but not LED's.


This is not true. An LED can be configured to be photo-resistant as well as photo-sensitive. Photodiodes are very common and you probably have one in your pocket if you have a smart phone. Those are LEDs.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:27 PM
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Has someone LED you to SEE the possibility?



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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You got your technology's mixed up... You are thinking LCD not LED...

And no, it doesn't work both ways.

en.wikipedia.org...

www.physicsforums.com...
edit on 26-5-2012 by porschedrifter because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by Cuervo
 

There we go !



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 03:11 PM
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Perhaps not completely on-topic, but related........

If you wear an LED headlamp, it will illuminate animal/people eyes in the darkness. It's a phenomenon similar to 'red-eye' in photographs, and is a function of the angle between the animal eyes and yours as illuminated by the LED.

I can wear an LED headlamp at night and see several "sparkles" in the grass. They are spiders.



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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Your TV isn't watching you.

The cable company is watching you through the little red light on your digital receiver



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 06:03 PM
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Originally posted by alfa1

Originally posted by hbarker
In the new age of LED., all the led screens (plasma too) people have said that a Pixel CAN be used in both directions. . projecting an image forward, or, receiving an image like an EYE..



No.
Not true.
I could add more text here, but I'd be wasting my time since the whole premise of the argument is still wrong, false, not true and wrong and not true and also false. (and wrong)
And not true.



So basically you're saying that a pixel CAN NOT be used in both directions, projecting an image or receiving an image?
As in not? Like, not possible to be done and can not happen nor work like that with no way around it?
So this would most definitely be a false and incorrect assumption by the OP?
And wrong?



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 06:24 PM
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I don't know if this is talking about individual pixels, or sensors embedded among the individual pixels...

"As a result, the integrated sensing device can not only output images (e.g., as a display) but also input images (e.g., as a camera)."

Apple patent embeds thousands of cameras among LCD pixels

April 26th 2006

Oh Barry Fox, does a week ever go by when you don't find a great patent or two? Today the intrepid Mr. Fox manages to dig up an application by consumer-darling Apple for an LCD display embedded with thousands of microscopic image sensors that would allow users to video-conference while looking straight into the "camera." Data accumulated by the individual sensors would be stitched into actual images using special software, which will probably be bundled into future versions of iLife. Since the patent specifies almost as many sensors per screen as there are pixels, some of those sensors could have different focal lengths, with a defacto zoom lens created by switching between them. Apple goes on to suggest portable uses for the technology, such as employing the displays in cellphones and PDAs, so you can add another item to the list of features we'll be expecting from the iPhone and Newton 2.0 when they finally hit stores.


Apple's all-seeing screen

26 April 2006

We could soon see a new kind of display screen from computer maker Apple - one that simultaneously takes pictures while showing images.

The clever idea is to insert thousands of microscopic image sensors in-between the liquid crystal display cells in the screen. Each sensor captures its own small image, but software stitches these together to create a single, larger picture.

A large LCD screen filled with image sensors would be ideal for videoconferencing, Apple suggests, as participants would always appear to look straight into the "camera". The technique could also add a camera function to a cellphone or PDA without wasting space, and light from the screen should help illuminate a subject.

The more sensors there are, the wider and clearer the image. Sketches accompanying the company's patent show as many sensors as liquid crystal cells in a screen. If some of the sensors have different focal lengths, switching between them would make the screen behave like a zoom lens.

Read the full patent, here.

that patent; appft1.uspto.gov... R.&OS=DN/20060007222&RS=D ]http://appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=%2220060007222%22.PG NR.&OS=DN/20060007222&RS=D

Integrated sensing display

Abstract

An integrated sensing display is disclosed. The sensing display includes display elements integrated with image sensing elements. As a result, the integrated sensing device can not only output images (e.g., as a display) but also input images (e.g., as a camera).

...

1. A device comprising: a display area; an array of display elements located within the display area, each display element capable of displaying a pixel of information, either alone or in combination with other display elements; and an array of image elements located within the display area, each image element being capable of capturing visual information from a source in front of the display area; wherein each image element has a lens that does not interfere with any display elements.

2. The device of claim 1, wherein the image elements are located in a housing that isolates the image elements from the display elements.

3. The device of claim 2, wherein each image element is in its own housing.

4. The device of claim 3, wherein a row of image elements share a housing.

5. The device of claim 4, wherein the array of display elements is a formed in a deep encased cell structure.

6. The device of claim 1, wherein the array of display elements is a formed in a deep encased cell structure.

7. The device of claim 1, wherein the array of image elements is a formed in a plurality of deep wells or channels.

8. The device of claim 1 further comprising an image assembler that modifies the data that is received by the array of image elements.

9. The device of claim 1, wherein the image elements are dispersed within the display area such that they do not block any display elements.

10. The device of claim 1, wherein the image elements are dispersed within the display area in such a way that they prevent some pixels of information from being displayed.

11. The device of claim 1, wherein the device is used in a portable communication device.

12. The device of claim 11, wherein the portable communication device is a telephone.

13. The device of claim 11, wherein the portable communication device is personal digital assistant.

14. The device of claim 1, wherein the device is used in a computer monitor or a television.

15. A device comprising: an illumination area that includes at least one light source that emits light; and an array of image elements dispersed throughout the illumination area, each image element being capable of capturing visual information from a source in front of the illumination area; wherein the image elements are dispersed such that space in-between at least some image elements is able to emit light from the at least one light source of the illumination area.

16. The device of claim 15, wherein the device is a medical device.

17. A device comprising: a display area; an array of display elements located within the display area, each display element capable of displaying a pixel of information, either alone or in combination with other display elements; and an array of image elements located within the display area, each image element being capable of capturing visual information from a source in front of the display area.

18. The device of claim 17, wherein the image elements are located in a housing that isolates the image elements from the display elements.

19. The device of claim 18, wherein each image element is in its own housing.

20. The device of claim 18, wherein a row of image elements share a housing.

...


Originally posted by babybunnies
Your TV isn't watching you.

Comcast Cameras to Start Watching You?

Mar. 18, 2008

...Comcast responded to the article by claiming the device was, "in no way designed to – or capable of – monitoring your living room. These technologies are designed to allow simple navigation on a television set just as the Wii remote uses a camera to manage its much heralded gesture-based interactivity."

However, Albrecht shot back by pointing out that Kunkel told him the device was explicitly being designed so as to monitor who was entering the living room.

"After you granted me our initial video interview, you brought up the topic of Comcast knowing who was in the living room
in a conversation between you, myself and another conference attendee," writes Albrecht.

"I actually left and came back to follow up on this point while you were talking with that same attendee. At this point, you were aware that I was a reporter and I took handwritten notes in front of you as we talked to make sure I had an accurate accounting of what you were saying," he added...


That article/denial came out before stuff like the "smart tvs" and the xbox kinect admitted they'll be using facial recognition tech...

Microsoft's Kinect 2 will offer improved motion sensing and voice recognition over the current model including the ability to determine which direction they are facing. It will track the pitch and volume of player voices, and even track facial characteristics to measure different emotional states, including anger.

Voice-activated TVs debut at consumer electronics show

LAS VEGAS (CNN) - The 2012 International Consumer Electronics show is one of the largest consumer technology trade shows in the world and even with thousands of exhibitors, the biggest draws are always the televisions.

This year is no exception. The new trend is a TV you can talk to.

Samsung's new TVs are controlled by voice, physical gestures and facial recognition.

"What we've done is we've built a camera right into the TV. You can surge the web by moving your hand around. You can point to click," Ethan Rasiel with Samsung said...

Is your TV watching you? Latest models raise concerns

Samsung’s 2012 top-of-the-line plasmas and LED HDTVs offer new features never before available within a television including a built-in, internally wired HD camera, twin microphones, face tracking and speech recognition. While these features give you unprecedented control over an HDTV, the devices themselves, more similar than ever to a personal computer, may allow hackers or even Samsung to see and hear you and your family, and collect extremely personal data.

While Web cameras and Internet connectivity are not new to HDTVs, their complete integration is, and it's the always connected camera and microphones, combined with the option of third-party apps (not to mention Samsung's own software) gives us cause for concern regarding the privacy of TV buyers and their friends and families.

Samsung has not released a privacy policy clarifying what data it is collecting and sharing with regard to the new TV sets. And while there is no current evidence of any particular security hole or untoward behavior by Samsung's app partners, Samsung has only stated that it "assumes no responsibility, and shall not be liable" in the event that a product or service is not "appropriate."

Samsung demoed these features to the press earlier this month. The camera and microphones are built into the top if the screen bezel in the 2012 8000-series plasmas and are permanently attached to the top of the 7500- and 8000ES-series LED TVs. A Samsung representative showed how, once set up and connected to the Internet, these models will automatically talk to the Samsung cloud and enable viewers to use new and exciting apps.

These Samsung TVs locate and make note of registered viewers via sophisticated face recognition software. This means if you tell the TV whose faces belong to which users in your family, it personalizes the experience to each recognized family member. If you have friends over, it could log these faces as well.

In addition, the TV listens and responds to specific voice commands. To use the feature, the microphone is active. What concerns us is the integration of both an active camera and microphone.

...

A Samsung representative said the company is working on apps that will allow its Smart TV owners to turn their televisions into a silent home-security system by allowing remote viewing on a smartphone or tablet via the TV’s built-in camera. This ability makes us ask, “Who else could gain access this video feed?”

edit on 26-5-2012 by 1825114 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2012 @ 06:35 PM
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The real answer is yes. Here a proof of concept:
low res led camera


The build is based around [Udo]‘s Blinkenlight shield he’s been developing over the past year. The camera operates under the idea that there’s really not much difference between a LED and a photodiode; LEDs can do light emission and detection. In actuality, the LED ‘camera’ isn’t all that different from a linear CCD array, the type of image sensor in flatbed scanners. After connecting his Blinkenlight shield to his Arduino and computer, [Udo] wrote a sketch that would capture 17 values from his LED camera. These values are shot over the serial connection where high levels of light show up as smaller numbers and low light levels are understood as larger numbers.


Anyone that says no must have a poor electronics background as this is old time hacking stuff.
1825114 patent examples are also spot on. I suggest using a search engine for those who said no that this is not possible. clearly it is, but the information just eluded you.
edit on 5/26/2012 by Metatronin because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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WOW .. On an episode of Coast to Coast Am This past week , I heard Steve Quayle mention that even now any Tech that you have or could probably imagine , IS 10 Fold being used and suppressed by the powers that be.



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