It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Condensation in space?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 14 2012 @ 06:31 PM
link   
Condensation in space does it form or exist?

Can condensation form in a vacuum?

I was just thinking this, because if there is condensation in space, that means that some dark places like mars would have liquid/water.

Sorry for the short thread just want to hear peoples thoughts.
edit on 14-5-2012 by amraks because: wording adjustment

edit on 14-5-2012 by amraks because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-5-2012 by amraks because: wording adjustment




posted on May, 14 2012 @ 06:52 PM
link   
Well a planet like Mars has an atmosphere. In the vacuum of space there will be no condensation, because there is no oxygen or water vapor, or anything else. All condensation is really is the changing of a gas into a liquid. Different elements will differ in when or if they condense. I do not know much about Mars, but I know the possibility is there for condensation, and is not there for space.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 07:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by JiggyPotamus
Well a planet like Mars has an atmosphere. In the vacuum of space there will be no condensation, because there is no oxygen or water vapor, or anything else. All condensation is really is the changing of a gas into a liquid. Different elements will differ in when or if they condense. I do not know much about Mars, but I know the possibility is there for condensation, and is not there for space.


Of coarse their is water in space. Just not water vapor, it would be ice



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 07:05 PM
link   
reply to post by amraks
 


Liquid water, in space, tends to 'boil away' as there is insufficient atmospheric pressure for it to remain liquid.

This boiling has nothing to do with heat, the water stays at roughly the same temperature it was before boiling.

Water in space is usually in the form of ice because it doesn't last long once liquid.

When water ice in comets is melted by the Sun, it so quickly disperses into space that there is no sign of it going through a liquid phase. In NASA speak, it sublimates into a gas, which appears as the tail of the comet.

Note that this is not water vapor (which is tiny droplets of liquid water) like a cloud, but is literally a molecular gas.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 07:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by chr0naut
reply to post by amraks
 


Liquid water, in space, tends to 'boil away' as there is insufficient atmospheric pressure for it to remain liquid.

This boiling has nothing to do with heat, the water stays at roughly the same temperature it was before boiling.

Water in space is usually in the form of ice because it doesn't last long once liquid.

When water ice in comets is melted by the Sun, it so quickly disperses into space that there is no sign of it going through a liquid phase. In NASA speak, it sublimates into a gas, which appears as the tail of the comet.

Note that this is not water vapor (which is tiny droplets of liquid water) like a cloud, but is literally a molecular gas.



i think that if there is a space ship all derelict and abandoned out in space for a REALLY long time, and the space ship is REALLY cold on the outside, maybe even colder than the "space" around it....

that it could technically "ice up" like the windows on a car.

i might not all be water ice though.



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 10:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by SoymilkAlaska

Originally posted by chr0naut
reply to post by amraks
 


Liquid water, in space, tends to 'boil away' as there is insufficient atmospheric pressure for it to remain liquid.

This boiling has nothing to do with heat, the water stays at roughly the same temperature it was before boiling.

Water in space is usually in the form of ice because it doesn't last long once liquid.

When water ice in comets is melted by the Sun, it so quickly disperses into space that there is no sign of it going through a liquid phase. In NASA speak, it sublimates into a gas, which appears as the tail of the comet.

Note that this is not water vapor (which is tiny droplets of liquid water) like a cloud, but is literally a molecular gas.



i think that if there is a space ship all derelict and abandoned out in space for a REALLY long time, and the space ship is REALLY cold on the outside, maybe even colder than the "space" around it....

that it could technically "ice up" like the windows on a car.

i might not all be water ice though.


Even if it were incredibly cold, it would take ages for the ship to encounter enough matter of any type, to ice up.

Space is a very hard vacuum!



posted on May, 15 2012 @ 11:25 PM
link   
reply to post by SoymilkAlaska
 


Really curious what would make you think this? And how would it get colder than space, most of space is as close as you can get to absolute zero, with the 3 degree difference due to background radiation.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join