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Mexico is out of control

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posted on May, 5 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by Cassius666
50.000 people killed in mexico since 2006. Thats about 10.000 less than the us, which averages about 10.000 dead a year due to gun violence, which isnt all that much considering the size of the population and fact that weapons are widely avaiable.


The per capita murder rate in Mexico is much,much higher than it is in the US.

Source


Individuals run a greater risk of being violently murdered in Mexico than in the United States, where the population is more than three times larger than its southern neighbor. Mexico’s secretary of Interior, Francisco Blake Mora, said there currently are 12 violent homicides registered for every 100,000 Mexican residents, as reported in the Nov. 10 El Universal, a Spanish-language newspaper in Mexico. In other words, about 1 in every 8,300 residents is violently murdered in Mexico. In Mexico, as in the United States, a violent murder is differentiated from a “justifiable homicide,” such as may occur through self-defense or when a felon is killed by a police officer in the line of duty. Murder in Mexico, as in America, refers to the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. FBI data show that in the United States, “There were 5.0 murders per 100,000 inhabitants in 2009, an 8.1 percent decrease from the 2008 rate.” That means that in 2009 there was 1 murder per 20,000 U.S. inhabitants. When compared to Mexico’s current rate of 1 murder per 8,300 Mexican residents, an individual runs a greater risk of being violently murdered in Mexico than in the United States.




posted on May, 5 2012 @ 10:57 AM
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Karma is en route. Happy Cinco De Mayo, viva la revolution.


Btw, the whole world is out of control.
edit on 5-5-2012 by robhines because: added



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 11:03 AM
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Originally posted by Juggernog
How is this considered a domestic issue and not a full blown civil war?
If Mexico were a country in the Middle East, this would merit UN intervention.
The hypocrisy is ridiculous.

Well, the link doesnt imbed properly, after several tries, so copy/paste I guess.
[url=http://www.foxnews.com/world/2012/05/04/at-least-23-people-killed-in-mexican-border-city-as-victims-hanged-decapitated/?test=latestnews]link[/url ]


The bodies of 23 people were found hanging from a bridge or decapitated and dumped near city hall Friday in the border city of Nuevo Laredo, where drug cartels are fighting a bloody and escalating turf war. Authorities found nine of the victims, including four women, hanging from an overpass leading to a main highway, said a Tamaulipas state official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to provide information on the case. Hours later, police found 14 human heads inside coolers outside city hall along with a threatening note. The 14 bodies were found in black plastic bags inside a car abandoned near an international bridge, the official said. The official didn't release the contents of the note, or give a motive for th Read more: www.foxnews.com...[ /ex]
edit on 5-5-2012 by Juggernog because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-5-2012 by Juggernog because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-5-2012 by Juggernog because: (no reason given)





























it's very simple actually, the cartels make money with the US DEA and are part of a much larger 1% society in which they work for.
edit on 5-5-2012 by LittleBlackEagle because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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posted on May, 5 2012 @ 11:54 AM
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if the united states legalized marijuana we would take away the demand and hit the cartels where it hurts the most, their pocketbooks!! the cartels have to be stopped! they are becoming "too big to fail"!



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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Originally posted by Juggernog

Originally posted by Cassius666
50.000 people killed in mexico since 2006. Thats about 10.000 less than the us, which averages about 10.000 dead a year due to gun violence, which isnt all that much considering the size of the population and fact that weapons are widely avaiable.


The per capita murder rate in Mexico is much,much higher than it is in the US.

Source


That means that in 2009 there was 1 murder per 20,000 U.S. inhabitants. When compared to Mexico’s current rate of 1 murder per 8,300 Mexican residents, an individual runs a greater risk of being violently murdered in Mexico than in the United States.



Also from your same source were other comments I found intriguing:


Although Mexico’s violent homicide rate exceeds that of the United Sates in terms of homicides per residents, Mora pointed out that in countries such as Brazil and Colombia the murder rate per resident is much higher than in Mexico.

Mexico’s Secretary of Interior noted that in Colombia, for example, there are 30 homicides per resident, and that in some Central American countries that figure is higher, reaching 40 homicides per resident.

The population of Mexico dwarfs that of Colombia and all other Central American countries. Brazil’s population (191 million), however, exceeds that of Mexico, but not that of the United States.

“Brazil itself has a much higher [homicide] average than Mexico,” said Mora, but he added that law-and-order in Brazil “is very different” than in Mexico.


Mexico has a much lower homicide rate than much of Latin America. Too bad the article did not go on to explain in what way law-and-order "is very different" in Brazil than in Mexico. I suppose Mexico's idea of law and order is different than that of the US, at least we know Mexico has a much smaller prison population and fewer people "on parole". Not mentioned were the homicide statistics in Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatamala which are almost astronomical. Those countries have few resources the US wishes to exploit or its people wish to invade so renders any discussion of them irrelevant as it is Mexico being targeted, as usual.

One law-and-order view was Latin America's intent to liberalize substance policies, though the US would not stand for them to do such a thing. You don't suppose the US-led Drug War has anything to do with Mexico's recent increase in homicide for the past few years? US war casulties probably come under the heading of "justifiable homicide"??

en.wikipedia.org...
Firearms-related deaths - per 100,000 population

United States
10.27 - total
4.14 - homicide
5.71 - suicide
0.23 - unintentional

Mexico
12.07 - total
9.88 - homicide
0.91 - suicide
1.27 - unintentional

In total numbers the separation is not as vast, Mexicans are just 7 times less likely to turn the guns on themselves as Americans are. Americans overwhelmingly prefer suicide to homicide. Of course in the US "suicide" is often a convenient euphemism if the death may have a less-than-comfortable other explanation. "Unintentional" may be Mexico's preferred euphemism.


edit on 5-5-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by jam321
 


Amazing avatar, Devildog.



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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US doesn't care?....

There's not enough oil in mexico.



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I guess maybe the difference is that here in the states, even in the most crime ridden cities, you wont have 20+ horrific killings, in one day, like the ones in Nuevo Laredo. Bodies hanging from bridges, heads left at the city hall.
Nor will you have cities that are actually occupied by what amounts to a paramilitary force, thats so powerful that it even rivals the States military.
Remember, this isnt just happening in Laredo, its even worse in Juarez and other cities throughout Mexico.



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by Juggernog
 


You seriously don't know why? They are fighting over drugs in Mexico. If it was oil, then the other nations would step in. The people pulling the strings only have invested interest in the Middle East because of the oil. There could be 20 bodies a day for 4 years and nobody in power would give a crap. As long as their pockets are not effected, it will continue.

O wait, I'm sorry I have mistaken. They care about the oil for our economy so we can afford to drive to work and the grocery store. It has nothing to do with their personal bottom line...



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 07:11 PM
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Originally posted by Juggernog
reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I guess maybe the difference is that here in the states, even in the most crime ridden cities, you wont have 20+ horrific killings, in one day, like the ones in Nuevo Laredo. Bodies hanging from bridges, heads left at the city hall.
Nor will you have cities that are actually occupied by what amounts to a paramilitary force, thats so powerful that it even rivals the States military.
Remember, this isnt just happening in Laredo, its even worse in Juarez and other cities throughout Mexico.


I feel for what you must be going through. The violence you experience is largely done without reason or purpose.


edit on 5-5-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


Thank you but I dont live in Mexico, sorry if I gave that impression. I live about 2.5 hours away from Laredo, I used to love visiting there back in the 90s, I think the last time I went was when I had a job there on this side of the border and crossed over to Mexico to get some drinks and buy some blankets.



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 07:42 PM
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my rant on these shenanigans

www.youtube.com...



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I see what you did there.


To be fair, I'm sure many of the 16k+ murders (average of the last 10 years) in the US every year are linked to drugs, so the reason and purpose is similar to the one south of the border.
edit on 6-5-2012 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by daskakik
 


I would be fairly certain the US has some drug-related violence though it may appear to be more random and without purpose. Law and order may be "very different" in Brazil than Mexico but I know law enforcement in the US is very different in their own right. Our US Drug War advisors here in Mexico have the authorities going after "kingpins" in its operations. That causes more "splintering" when a boss is taken out and the lieutenants struggle to take over turf. These methods lead to more open battles among the warriors. This also allows US-trained groups like the Zetas to swoop-in and gain ground. Also makes for some provocative press for the more impressionable minds. We already know there are some "provocateurs" involved that are not connected to the "cartels."

US drug enforcement efforts are aimed at the street and mid-levels which creates a lot of tension on users and small clandestine groups, so as a result the street-crime lash-back appears more random and senseless. Drug War directors in the US know better than looking up too high on the drug traffic food-chain. Banks and big concerns start coming into view if they do that, which is a no-no. Everyone knows the big money is not being made until it gets on the US side of the border, so Chapo and the boys are really just small potatoes in the whole process.

The Drug War was never conceived to stop or stem drug traffic, it's always been a matter of controlling the traffic. Globally.


edit on 6-5-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 02:05 AM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
reply to post by daskakik
 

as a result the street-crime lash-back appears more random and senseless.

I agree, which is why I said the reason and purpose was similar and not the same. It's fought at a different level. Since that the US is the end of the line of the products the focus is on the street pusher and drug user which, as you stated, makes it seem more "random and senseless" but it is still a product of the drug trade.


We already know there are some "provocateurs" involved that are not connected to the "cartels."

Seeing that I hang my hat in Guatemala, I know just what you mean.




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