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Japan Chemical Plant Explosion: Radioactive Depleted Uranium on Site

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posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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www.groundreport.com...


The NHK TV channel reported that the blast killed one worker and injured 17, including nearby residents. The explosion occurred at Mitsui Chemicals' Iwakuni-Ohtake facility in the Yamaguchi prefecture.



Posted below video of the post-explosion, on fire Iwakuni Otake Petrochemical Complex in Yamaguchi Prefecture in southwestern Japan after an explosion rocked the plant at 2:20 am, April 22, 2012, killing one worker, injuring eleven. The cause of the explosion is being reported as lighting. Also at the site, stored uranium for nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. The complex is reported as being used for the manufacture process of chemical adhesives.


People of Japan my thoughts are with you. How much more can your nation take? I know that you are strong willed people and will get through all of your disasters.

I'm not liking the fact of this stored uranium on site. There is almost nothing in the MSM about this new disaster.





posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 09:50 AM
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Japans Karma sucks



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 09:58 AM
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Odd,
US allies and banking buddies aren't doing so good these days.

I hope the peeps make out OK.
edit on 22-4-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 12:13 PM
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Here's a vid from RT of the explosion:


edit on 22-4-2012 by unityemissions because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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Here's a comment from this link:




In the Mitsubishi plant in Iwakuni city in which the fire explosion accident occurred, about 3400 drums filled with depleted uranium are stored. Though the leakage of the depleted uranium has not been reported, it can not be determined because the safety has not been measured. In Iwakuni, it was raining all day whike the accident. Dense fog advisory is out now. Toxic gas has been released to the environment because of the large scale of the chemical factory fire. It shoud be wise for people living or sightseeng there to self-defense with mask and so on.


edit on 22-4-2012 by unityemissions because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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Good grief. Really?



Every advancing day proves our irresponsibility and inability to do this whole nuclear power thing right.
edit on 22-4-2012 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by loam
 


Agreed. In the states we store our radioactive waste underground and in mountains.

To think that nuclear power was ever a reasonable approach, however, is unfounded.

The EROEI is incredibly low compared to practically every alternative. When you factor in the potential consequnces, it should never have been allowed in the first place.

Greed, as always, is key to making sense of the seemingly insane.




posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 02:52 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 



Originally posted by unityemissions
In the states we store our radioactive waste underground and in mountains.


Not, really.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 02:59 PM
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reply to post by loam
 


This has NOTHING to do with nuclear power. They were using depleted uranium in some industrial process yes but there was nothing generating nuclear power involved in this accident.

The future of nuclear power is going to be the more efficient and safe Thorium breeder reactors. India is investing heavily and leading the way in that technology. The American version of nuclear power are giant deadly behemoths that are only around because we can use them to make material for nukes. It's a political roadblock, not a scientific one strictly, that is keeping us from safer, more efficient nuclear energy.
edit on 22-4-2012 by Mkoll because: (no reason given)


Is Thorium The Nuclear Fuel of the Future?
edit on 22-4-2012 by Mkoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by loam
 


My bad!

I went to a lecture at SMU about 5 years ago and the professor was very concerned about the nuclear waste. He talked about the need to store it underground and inside of mountains, and said he was working diligently to make this possible in the near future.

Apparently, he was unsuccessful.

We're storing this crud at power plant sites, and calling that safe


It's so bloody hard to stick to a supposedly "sane" perspective that this negligence and incompetence is but a result of greed and not a nefarious intent, sometimes.

The question I keep asking myself is, "are we truly all this bloody stupid" ??

It hurts to admit this may be the case...



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by Mkoll
 


...and that uranium became depleted, how ??



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:05 PM
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^
|
|

me

* looks up *

realizes this nightmare is still not over.

oh well...

back to sticking my head in the sand regarding nucleaur reactors.



edit on 22-4-2012 by kn0wh0w because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 


What blew up is an adhesives factory. We have no information on what happened to the nuclear materials stored on site. It is quite possible they are fine and it's also possible they are not. If they are fine then that makes this issue a pretty straightforward industrial accident and the fact there is uranium on site really has no bearing on it. If the opposite is true THEN we have a nuclear issue



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by Mkoll
reply to post by unityemissions
 


What blew up is an adhesives factory. We have no information on what happened to the nuclear materials stored on site. It is quite possible they are fine and it's also possible they are not.


Agree.


If they are fine then that makes this issue a pretty straightforward industrial accident and the fact there is uranium on site really has no bearing on it. If the opposite is true THEN we have a nuclear issue




The fact that depleted uranium is stored in an accident-prone area is very relevant, period.

I don't think things are okay when they are set up for disaster, if it's yet to happen.


I find your link very interesting. Thorium does seem the way to go, though I would like to do a bit more research and find more sources which back up the claims made in the article.
edit on 22-4-2012 by unityemissions because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by UFO1414
 


Does someone here understand Japanese



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by UFO1414
www.groundreport.com...


Posted below video of the post-explosion, on fire Iwakuni Otake Petrochemical Complex in Yamaguchi Prefecture in southwestern Japan after an explosion rocked the plant at 2:20 am, April 22, 2012, killing one worker, injuring eleven. The cause of the explosion is being reported as lighting. Also at the site, stored uranium for nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. The complex is reported as being used for the manufacture process of chemical adhesives.


I'm not liking the fact of this stored uranium on site. There is almost nothing in the MSM about this new disaster.


Since no nuclear fuel, spent or otherwise is required in the production of chemical adhesives, why I wonder is there nuclear fuel and spent nuclear material on the site? Seems a bit strange to store something that could be aerosolized in a chemical plant that could one day explode or catch on fire.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by unityemissions
 


That is a very good point you make. I wonder what the logic there is. Perhaps it saved someone on taxes or some kind of expense.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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Originally posted by bobs_uruncle
Since no nuclear fuel, spent or otherwise is required in the production of chemical adhesives, why I wonder is there nuclear fuel and spent nuclear material on the site? Seems a bit strange to store something that could be aerosolized in a chemical plant that could one day explode or catch on fire.

Cheers - Dave


I think it's pretty common for governments to "utilize" the storage facilities and handling expertise of private companies on industrial sites for these things.

It might be a chemical site that deals primarily in adhesives, but it would also make a great cover for dealing with other nasty little secrets in their hazardous materials category too. It's cheaper and more effective than building another installation for the sole purpose of dealing with this material.

Also has to be pointed out that this is a big site. Just because there is this material handled by the company does not mean that it was contained in an affected area.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 10:19 PM
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How much more of this are we going to take!? We are killing ourselves with this Nuclear stuff when Free Energy is right around the corner? Its about time we stood up and stopped this outrage. How many more people have to suffer? 1,000,000? 2,000,000?

How can we all band together?

How can we stop this with one voice?
edit on 22-4-2012 by princeguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 10:57 PM
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reply to post by UFO1414
 


My first post/reply so I hope it's useful...

Japan isn't out of the woods yet with possible new quakes.

Here is a great audio/visual of recent historical quake activity.
matadornetwork.com...

Here is a great tool that demonstrates we're just seeing the beginning of quake disasters around the globe.
research.dlindquist.com...

What I believe this incident represents is really just the tip of the iceberg should more quakes follow while they are trying to recover. I hope they realize that the disaster isn't finished happening but just beginning.

Best wishes to their people and a remarkable culture.





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