advice regarding me upgrading my CPU.

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posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:45 PM
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My problem is this, i have a Foxconn G31 mx k motherboard, im wanting to swap the intel dual core CPU with an intel core 2 quad CPU. Both are supported by the motherboard, but when i install the new CPU and try to boot up the pc it goes into repair mode and says it cannot repair at this time.

I was (stupidly, maybe) expecting to just be able to swap them and hey presto!, but to no avail, where/what am i going/doing wrong ATS ?

Any help will be greatly appreciated.




posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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It should just boot right up with no problems. Is a core 2 quad EXTREME? If its a extreme then your motherboard does not support it. If it wont then you probably bought a bad CPU. Did you buy it used? ALL WAYS!!!! Check out the product before buying it.

Have you tried putting the old CPU back in the motherboard? Will it boot with the old one?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 

What version of windows?

ETA Vista is a wrong answer. Vista Home? If so, that does not support your processor as the new one is actually 2 physical CPU's in one die and Home only supports one physical processor. Don't you just love Microsoft?

edit on 26/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA


ETA2 Forgot source even though the article applies to Windows 7, Vista licensing is the same.
edit on 26/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA2



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


Thanks for the quick reply. The old one went straight back in and rebooted no problem, im using it now
. The core 2 quad CPU is not new its from a pc that has a broken motherboard. Ive salvaged the hard drive, RAM and DVD-RW from it all working fine and i removed the CPU very carefully. I hope it isnt faulty.


To the poster above, im using vista, thanks.

edit on 26/3/2012 by Catch_a_Fire because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 


I'm not sure. I would think it would run also.
Maybe you need a bios upgrade to support that cpu?

If you have a spare hard drive.
Try to do an install of windows on that and see if it will work.
If it does there could be some hardware id conflict or something of that nature.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:04 PM
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Clear CMOS



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 

Theoretically it should boot up fine when just swapping cpu. If you also had swapped mobo, then you might have run into such issues. It sounds like your boot partition somehow got corrupted.
I would suggest you try a clean reinstall and if that does not work then the cpu is probably what caused the corruption/boot problems.

Also have you made sure that you got a PSU is powerful enough for a quad core? It could also be stability issues due to that.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by Catch_a_Fire
 

What version of windows?

ETA Vista is a wrong answer. Vista Home? If so, that does not support your processor as the new one is actually 2 physical CPU's in one die and Home only supports one physical processor. Don't you just love Microsoft?

edit on 26/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA


Why are you giving advice when yo know nothing about computers.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:10 PM
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Here is a piece of advice concerning CPU's. I will never own anything Intel. When a company gouges its customers as badly as they do, they don't deserve any customers. Over a $1000 for an Intel i7-3960X Extreme Edition cpu vs. an AMD FX-8150 cpu at under $250. The performance is not equal in these two flagship processors, the Intel chip IS better, in most cases, but is it really over $750 dollars better than AMD's cpu? I'll leave it up to you to decide.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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Small chance that it can be your motherboard not providing enough power. I know it supports core 2 quads but if you look at the motherboard, it only has a 4pin CPU power connector. Most core 2 quad motherboards have 8pin power connectors. The connector I am talking about is
images10.newegg.com...
The square thing with 4 pins next to the pink thing at the bottom of the pic.

You can get better advice on how to trouble shoot it on a professional forum like overclock.net



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


The single- and dual-core models are single-die, whereas the quad-core models comprise two dies, each containing two cores, packaged in a multi-chip module.

Source
I'm actually a sys-admin although I haven't done Desktop support in a while it never really leaves you.


ETA OP, as others have mentioned it would be wise to check you have sufficient power to drive that new CPU. There should be a sticker/label on the PSU (power supply unit) with a maximum rating of what it can safely supply. Best to cover all bases.
edit on 26/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by Nucleardoom
Here is a piece of advice concerning CPU's. I will never own anything Intel. When a company gouges its customers as badly as they do, they don't deserve any customers. Over a $1000 for an Intel i7-3960X Extreme Edition cpu vs. an AMD FX-8150 cpu at under $250. The performance is not equal in these two flagship processors, the Intel chip IS better, in most cases, but is it really over $750 dollars better than AMD's cpu? I'll leave it up to you to decide.


Being a fan boy will only cause you to lose out on good deals. Any ways... This has nothing to do with his post. A robotic rant, regurgitated information you picked up from some forum.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by Infi8nity
 


The single- and dual-core models are single-die, whereas the quad-core models comprise two dies, each containing two cores, packaged in a multi-chip module.

Source
I'm actually a sys-admin although I haven't done Desktop support in a while it never really leaves you.


ETA OP, as others have mentioned it would be wise to check you have sufficient power to drive that new CPU. There should be a sticker/label on the PSU (power supply unit) with a maximum rating of what it can safely supply. Best to cover all bases.
edit on 26/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA



yeah but you said vista does not support quad cores



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by Nucleardoom
 


Why buy a Rolls Royce?
When a Scion xB will get get you where you need to go just fine?

I had this argument recently with a friend that got an AMD FX 8 core.
It's cheaper and all that. But AMD has always had a bad history with it's drivers.
And I don't see that changing in the future.
Intel on the other hand has drivers and driver updates.
Better than AMD any day.

I guess you get what you pay for.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Originally posted by Nucleardoom
Here is a piece of advice concerning CPU's. I will never own anything Intel. When a company gouges its customers as badly as they do, they don't deserve any customers. Over a $1000 for an Intel i7-3960X Extreme Edition cpu vs. an AMD FX-8150 cpu at under $250. The performance is not equal in these two flagship processors, the Intel chip IS better, in most cases, but is it really over $750 dollars better than AMD's cpu? I'll leave it up to you to decide.


If you went for a regular i7 the price would be closer and you'd still have better performance with the Intel. Comparing those 2 chips is not really a good example. I bought an i5 rerasonably cheap and it handles everything I chuck at it, and I make serious music productions on it!

Intel is also more reliable, and there are certain limitations with AMDs.

You get what you pay for.

OP, why dont you get a fresh hard drive and do a completely fresh install of windows? That should make it work.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by Infi8nity
 


The single- and dual-core models are single-die, whereas the quad-core models comprise two dies, each containing two cores, packaged in a multi-chip module.

Source
I'm actually a sys-admin although I haven't done Desktop support in a while it never really leaves you.


ETA OP, as others have mentioned it would be wise to check you have sufficient power to drive that new CPU. There should be a sticker/label on the PSU (power supply unit) with a maximum rating of what it can safely supply. Best to cover all bases.
edit on 26/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA


It may be that i have a little ray of hope, i should have mentioned earlier, when i took the quad CPU back out of the pc it was very hot, could this be due to the lack of power?.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by Nucleardoom
 


Then explain to me people buying Alienware Area 51 desktops at 3 TB, with INTEL, at 3K a piece, my brother bought one, and I have top of the line AMD and his Alienware PC screams past my PC. If there was a comparison, I would put one, but there isn't. His new PC pimp slaps mine like I was in the stone age.

29INFDIV



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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Originally posted by Catch_a_Fire

Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by Infi8nity
 


The single- and dual-core models are single-die, whereas the quad-core models comprise two dies, each containing two cores, packaged in a multi-chip module.

Source
I'm actually a sys-admin although I haven't done Desktop support in a while it never really leaves you.


ETA OP, as others have mentioned it would be wise to check you have sufficient power to drive that new CPU. There should be a sticker/label on the PSU (power supply unit) with a maximum rating of what it can safely supply. Best to cover all bases.
edit on 26/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: ETA


It may be that i have a little ray of hope, i should have mentioned earlier, when i took the quad CPU back out of the pc it was very hot, could this be due to the lack of power?.


Did you put some thermale paste on the CPU?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 

I said Vista Home does not support quad core, which indeed it doesn't. It's a licensing issue, meaning MS wants more of your dollars. 2 of the cores may work, I have no idea but judging from what the OP is experiencing it is either a licensing issue, a power issue and possibly a BIOS issue, meaning it needs to be flashed. Whichever of the 3, it will not do what he wants because windows will only use 2 cores in the best case scenario. At the end of the day, if he wants to use that new CPU effectively, he will have to upgrade his OS at the very least.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:35 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 


I never used any thermal paste, and only came across that advice while browsing, after id installed the CPU.



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