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Movie of water flowing on Mars!

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posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


There might also be pooling involved as the water reaches higher terrain forming a broader end:









posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 09:19 PM
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Arkens link showed pics of wet/dry imo, as do OP pics, so the 'liquid' flows, dries, and whatever was in it leaves the trail, it could be anything that has liquid form first then a dry form.

All very technical terms I assure you


Is it accumulating because of moisture, or is it expelled end product/refuse from below?
Our Earth is a living body, why not Mars?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by AussieAmandaC
Arkens link showed pics of wet/dry imo, as do OP pics, so the 'liquid' flows, dries, and whatever was in it leaves the trail, it could be anything that has liquid form first then a dry form.

All very technical terms I assure you


Is it accumulating because of moisture, or is it expelled end product/refuse from below?
Our Earth is a living body, why not Mars?


There is liquid of some sort flowing,don't you agree?
What kind of liquid is the question,but there is a flow there.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 10:08 PM
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I cant really say its water could be wind blowing the sand down the slope and creating water like movement.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by Nicolas Flamel
 


"Mud" is a wonderful name. I think I'll call wet dirt "mud" from now on too.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 03:25 AM
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Originally posted by swampcricket
Ever heard of osmosis?
Yes, but I don't see how that could be related to what I wrote.

PS: there's no need to add a second line to a one line post, what matters most is the content, not the volume of the post.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 03:34 AM
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you dont need water on the surface for the planet to be viable, just as you dont need a tail fin on a stealth bomber, has anyone seen the life that exists in underground cave systems on planet earth??????
edit on 27-3-2012 by subtopia because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 06:30 AM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
reply to post by Nicolas Flamel
 


"Mud" is a wonderful name. I think I'll call wet dirt "mud" from now on too.


I know. I should've of thought of something catchier. But since most people think the surface is a totally dry and arid desert, wet mud is like an oasis.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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Originally posted by Nicolas Flamel
Yet more evidence of water near or at the surface of Mars.

This animation was made by combining images over a period of two years at the Horowitz Crater on Mars where the temperature can reach 80F during the martian summer:



Full resolution: www.nasa.gov...

You can see the water flowing downhill as the temperatures rise. Scientists say the salty liquid water is flowing through the soil. I think we call this mud.


Repeat imaging by HiRISE shows the features appear and incrementally grow during warm seasons and fade in cold seasons. They extend downslope from bedrock outcrops, often associated with small channels, and hundreds of them form in rare locations.


With water this close or at the surface, and with sunlight for energy, maybe it's time we sent a microscope to look for tiny beasties (microbes). The water is salty, but there are microbes that can live in salty water on earth called Halophiles.

The fact that these changes are occurring with the seasons rule out many non-water theories:


Streaky slopes closer to the equator, for instance, do not seem to display the seasonality that would be expected of melting and could simply be tracks from boulders rolling downhill


Other researchers, comparing these to similar flows on earth conclude:


whatever is moving down the Martian slopes behaves as liquid would in that environment. "If it moves like water, it may very well be water."


www.scientificamerican.com...

Does it look like water flowing to you? Is this why Mars programs are being cut back? Will a rich billionaire send his own probe?


edit on 26-3-2012 by Nicolas Flamel because: (no reason given)


no...that is NOT water...

that's shadows from the rocks!!



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 07:54 AM
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reply to post by Nicolas Flamel
 


Thanks for that, but I think that shows what happens inside the ground, not what happens at the surface, as it talks about different layers and permeability.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by Nicolas Flamel
 


That's also interesting, because if that's the case then we have two different events with what looks like the same result.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 07:59 AM
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reply to post by Nicolas Flamel
 


True, but I think that in that case we would be seeing that widening of the flow only happening near the end, but it starts from the beginning.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 08:25 AM
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Originally posted by txMEGAlithic
My question is... whats the hold up. I'm not sure what rovers, if any, are close to this crater. One would think this would be kind of a priority. To my knowledge, Curiosity is planned to land in the Gale Crater....is this close to the Horowitz Crater? If not, maybe the Gale Crater has some similar features that could be observed and sampled...


First of all, the rover "Spirit" is no longer operational. It became stuck in deep loose soil in 2009 and has not been heard from in 2 years (since march 2010). It got stuck in such a position that its solar panels could not receive enough sunlight to power it and keep it warm. It was a few thousand miles from Horowitz carter, away. So it could not go there, even if it was operational.

Opportunity is still working well, but is also few thousand miles away. The Rovers do not travel all over mars. Spirit went a total of 4.8 miles (7.7 km) in its lifetime. Opportunity has traveled a little over 21 miles (34.3 km) so far during its time on Mars.

I suppose if Opportunity was within a few miles of Horowitz crater, it would be worth sending it, but Opportunity is finding exciting stuff where it is. It spent two years studying Victoria crater, which has outcroppings of sedimentary layers, and is now studying Endeavor crater -- and may study Endeavor crater for the next few years, or as long as its power can last. Endeavor Crater also promises to give scientist some exciting data about past (and maybe present) water on Mars.

It was near Endeavor Crater that Opportunity found the outcropping of gypsum rock they called "Homestake". This is very meaningful because gypsum is usually formed in a more neutral geology which is less acidic (and more hospitable to life) than other sulfate deposits found on Mars.

Gale Crater (where Curiosity will be landing when it gets to mars in August) is also a great place to study. It contains clays that suggest a watery formation. Because of these clays and other factors, Gale Crater is a good candidate for being the site where an ancient lake once stood.

By the way, Gale Crater is a little under 1000 miles (1500 km) from Horowitz crater.


edit on 3/27/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 08:41 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by Nicolas Flamel
 


Thanks for that, but I think that shows what happens inside the ground, not what happens at the surface, as it talks about different layers and permeability.


Exactly. The source articles linked indicate that the water is moving through the soil, not over it. So variable permeability of the soil layers is relevant.

I think you're thinking about how water moves on earth on the surface and comparing it to how water moves through the soil on mars. They won't look the same.

Also, at this location, even during the summer:


These times and places have peak surface temperatures from about 10 degrees below zero Fahrenheit to 80 degree above zero Fahrenheit


www.nasa.gov...

So you would have freezing at night, which could cause the flow to stop and pool until the thaw the next day.

I think there's more than one thing happening at once, but comparing this martian water flow to a temperate water flow on earth is misleading.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 03:17 PM
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I agree with the very likelihood of Life on Mars.

It is not only that extremophiles have been found in so many places: at the bottom of the Ocean in boiling water, some using pure sulphur systems, this is a relatively new science, with extremophiles being found in the 1980s. Even now bacteria are being found deeper underground and higher in space.

As for water on Mars, there are more smoking guns than the OK Corrall:
Snow Gullies on Mars
Gypsum found in Mars
Water ice on Mars
Large Ice over Mars
Water supersaturation in martian atmosphere

I chose the first two links from NASA, last three from ESA



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 03:24 PM
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Global Surveyor also provides some compelling evidence that could only happen if water is flowing recently:

Water on Mars



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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I don't know 100% if it is water or not (obviously). But they are not shadows cast by the rocks. (The photos were taken over a two year span, and the rock shadows are clearly visible right behind the rocks).

Water on mars would be an interesting breakthrough in the "life on mars" theory. I don't care if it's tiny microbial prokaryotes or shrimp or carbon-based rock life. ANY breakthrough would send shrivels down my spine.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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Originally posted by Nicolas Flamel
I think there's more than one thing happening at once, but comparing this martian water flow to a temperate water flow on earth is misleading.
Unfortunately, that's the only reference I have.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by mr10k
 


Any kind of life found off the Earth would mean life is probably everywhere. It would be an achievement in science as great as proving the Earth goes around the Sun.

I don't understand why they suddenly cut off funding. It's can't be religious thing since the Vatican has already said that extraterrestrial life does not preclude a belief in God. When the politicians are more conservative than the Vatican, I start to get worried.

I do know some NASA administrators are fighting to get some of the funding back, I hope they win.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 09:20 PM
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Originally posted by Nicolas Flamel
reply to post by mr10k
 


Any kind of life found off the Earth would mean life is probably everywhere...

I generally agree with this, except for one caveat: If life was found on Mars AND it was biologically similar to life on Earth, then it could be argued that life started on only ONE of the two planets, and that planet seeded the other with fife (potentially from a chunk of meteor that broke off).

For finding life on Mars to definitely mean that life may be ubiquitous in the universe, then that life would need to seem very different from earth life. If that life is different enough to have probably come from its own independent genesis on Mars, that that would[/i mean that life is probably ubiquitous throughout the universe...

...After all, life could be thought of as being so common that sprung up twice independently in the same solar system.


edit on 3/27/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



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