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Amen might be of pagan origin?

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posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:26 AM
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This whole time i have been praying i could have been sinning all along? I knew paganism ran deep but this deep i did not know. Anyway i found this to be interesting.




From old Egyptian texts we can see that people regarded the sun as the emblem of the Creator. They called the sun Ra, and all other gods and goddesses were forms of the Creator. One of these gods was Amen; a secret, hidden and mysterious god named variously Amen, Amon, Amun, Ammon and Amounra. For the first eleven dynasties (c. 3000-1987 B.C.) Amen was just a minor god, but by the 17th dynasty (c. 1500 B.C.) he had been elevated to be the national god of southern Egypt. This position gave Amen the attributes and characteristics of the most ancient gods, and his name became Amen-Ra, that is, a supreme form of God the Creator. By the 18th Dynasty (1539-1295 B.C.) a college had been established to study Amen-Ra and as a focal point for worship.

Jews settled in Egypt for around 400 years4 from 1847 B.C. and during this sojourn they would certainly have been fully exposed to the worship of Amen-Ra. By the time of their exodus from Egypt in 1447 B.C., the term 'Amen' would be in their language even if it was not their god. It would be a word that had associations with reverence and majesty. This is not difficult to understand. People still talk about Moses, Jesus, Mohammed and Buddha, and often use those names completely out of context as expletives. Amen was seen as a powerful god and the name continued, out of context, as an exclamation or salutation; a classic example of language evolution. From the Jews, the word was adopted by Christians, Muslims and others.

So Amen was originally the name of a Pagan god, who was considered a form of God the Creator. But he was certainly not considered God, or Christ. Interestingly, most Pagans today tend not to use the word, preferring instead to say "So mote it be", an old Anglo-Saxon term. Perhaps they see the word Amen in the Bible and the Tanakh and don't want to be associated with Christianity or the like. Indeed, in the Bible3 we see Jesus Christ referred to as "The Amen". Christ is God's Amen to all that he has spoken. Thereby the name used for an old Egyptian god is replaced by the same name used for Christ.

Like many other words used in religion, (or art, mathematics, medicine, etc) it's easy to believe that our ancestors saw no point in creating new vocabulary when existing and familiar words could be recycled. (The term 'God', for example, has been recycled by most religions.) Yet some people are vehemently protective of things and believe Amen is a biblical word which is also found in the Tanakh and in Islam, and happens to sound like the name of a Pagan god. Others believe it is an Islamic word that can also be found in the Bible and Tanakh. And so on. The whole issue is hotly debated and any Pagan link denied by many. Who knows how many accidental or deliberate mistranslations have crept in over the centuries.

Those who believe that God is the Great Mathematician will no doubt point to the numeric value of Amen:

"Finally, we may note that the word Amen occurs not infrequently in early Christian inscriptions, and that it was often introduced into anathemas and gnostic spells. Moreover, as the Greek letters which form Amen according to their numerical values total 99 (alpha=1, mu=40, epsilon=8, nu=50), this number often appears in inscriptions, especially of Egyptian origin, and a sort of magical efficacy seems to have been attributed to its symbol."

(Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 1; 1907)

Nowhere in the Bible, the Tanakh or the Qur'an can we find words to suggest one can be redeemed by merely uttering a magic word.

Whether Amen is magic, rooted in a Pagan deity, originally a Christian word, a Muslim word, a Jewish word, or anything else, the question is the same: So what? When Christians, Jews and Muslims say Amen, they do not invoke any god or any power just by saying that word or indeed any other word. Amen does not even make other words more sincere. But Amen, like all the other language we use, helps us to focus on what we mean in our hearts.

And that is the answer to "So what?" What really matters is what is said by the heart


Now this site shows Amen having different meanings but its origins may have come from Egypt when the Israelites were slaves. I dont take all of this as fact but i do wanna ask my fellow believers what they might think on this subject,considering both religions of judaism and christianity have been afflicted with paganism since the time of solomon all the way to constantine and beyond.

And as the lord has said



Make no mention of the name of other gods, neither let it be heard out of thy mouth.' (Exodus 23:13)


Talk about the ultimate blasphemy seeing as so many people end there prayers to the Lord with this word. If this holds true that is.
www.seiyaku.com...




posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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pretty sure all if not most religions are based on some sort of paganism.

paganism is not evil, there for you are not sinning. you shouldn't really be all to concerned about it in the first place since you know...youre god is all forgiving and loves you and such...though he'll send you to hell for eternity for being human.
edit on 18-3-2012 by XelNaga because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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Now this site shows Amen having different meanings but its origins may have come from Egypt when the Israelites were slaves. I dont take all of this as fact but i do wanna ask my fellow believers what they might think on this subject,considering both religions of judaism and christianity have been afflicted with paganism since the time of solomon all the way to constantine and beyond.

Correct.
It's an ancient Egyptian religious term, and the name of a god also.
It's fact.

I'm not a fellow "believer", but just wanted to congratulate you, and to let you know, also, you are not expected to be perfect yet. When you are perfected, after many, many lifetimes of experience, then you will rest eternally with the Divine/One Source, of which we are all parts. All of us.

Tell ya what, I'm even gonna Flag and Star you for having the courage to look into something beyond your "religious" boundaries. Go you!
edit on 18-3-2012 by wildtimes because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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Well...most of Christianities biggest holidays are based off of pagan events too so this comes as no surprise. Easter and Christmas both were set the same as pagan events, to sort of "help" people along with their worship on those days.
They didn't have to remember when the new Christian events were. They were the same as the older times.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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This has been posted already, but let me elaborate.

The idea that Amen is a pagan term is not new, however, that is simply not true.

Amen, was first used in the Hebrew Bible, the Old Testament, and it means "so be it".

The word is believed to be of Hebrew origin, however, the root word is derived from a number of other Semitic languages, such as Arabic and Aramaic. Very ancient tongues. The word came to be used in the Greek of the early church from Judaism, and from Greek amen entered into the western languages. It is believed it made the jump from Greek, to Latin, and then to English.

The Hebrew word amen, derives from the same ancient triliteral common root word as does the verb aman. This triliteral root means to be firm, confirmed, reliable, faithful, have faith.

Now, the theory with some theosophists, proponents of Afrocentric theories of history, and some adherents of esoteric Christianity, and also among atheists and disbelievers, is that amen derives from the Egyption god Amun (sometimes spelled amen), and some believers in Eastern religions believe amen shares its root with the Hindu Sanskrit word Aum. The Hebrew word, starts with aleph, while the Egyptian name begins with a yodh.

I hope this gives you a little better understanding of where the word TRULY derives from. Seek and ye shall find! Amen - So Be It!



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:54 AM
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Amen=Om



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by el1jah
Amen=Om


Come on now, really? This is ATS, can you please give us some substance... at least more than two words and a symbol.......
edit on 3/18/2012 by Iason321 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by Iason321
 


Source

Nice way to quote directly from the Wiki, not verbatim, but definitely not yours. Plagiarism fail...



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by SumerianSoldier
 


Hast thou not heard of paraphrasing?

Wisdom & knowledge fail.


Had you asked, I would have quoted my source.

I can find other sources too if you'd like.

But I imagine that won't be necessary, since your minds already made up and you already know the truth of the universe.

edit on 3/18/2012 by Iason321 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by wildtimes
 


I see your posts how there filled with good demeanor and no insulting words. Even though you might not believe in Jesus i can feel that you do good unto people which is his message. How ironic it would be for you to pass and face no judgement in the eyes of the lord while the so called church goers who dont practice what they preach will face his judgement's. Even though your ideals may differ that in its self to me seems like a fellow believer atleast to me.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by Iason321
 


But how do you know for sure good sir? satan is older then time its self. He is no fool but a genius compared to the minds of man. That word could be one of his many ways of turning one away from the ways of God.




Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it.But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it.Matthew 7:14-15



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by Iason321
 


Wisdom denotes having experience in the matter of something, Knowledge implies that you already have the information stored in your head. (I'm paraphrasing, of course.
) Neither of which you demonstrated with your post. You also belittled el1jah for not citing any sources when you didn't provide yours.

Also, you can provide sources for anything from the internet...

My mind is no more closed than yours, my friend, it's just that my mind closed a door on a different avenue than yourself. Please accept my apology for the unwarranted attack, I'm feeling a bit peevish today.
edit on 18-3-2012 by SumerianSoldier because: Add a line



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by SumerianSoldier
 


Apology accepted, I hold no grudges against anybody.


Completely off topic, are you a tattoo artist?



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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reply to post by vaelamin
 


Vaelamin, I can tell from your posts that you are most likely relatively new to Christianity, am I correct?
Don't worry about little things like saying Amen somehow being satanic, or using the exact name of Yeshua, Jesus, God, Yahweh, YHWH, etc etc...

You have found Christ, now pray for the Holy Spirit and Wisdom, and continue in your research and studies. Let the seed bring forth its bounty



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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Ah yes, another thread created by someone trying to say one word from one language is the same word in a different language


Amen means "so be it" or "may it be" and the actual hebrew to english translation is Aman. When christians pray they say "In Jesus'/Yeshua's/Yahshua's name, amen" so it comes out "In Jesus name, so be it", it is not referring to some backwater dead god from ages passed. Modern christianity has a tendency to meld certain words into english. In my church we actually say "aman" at the end because we are judeo-christian.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 01:06 PM
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Amenhotep I,II,III,IV

Amun Ra (aka Amen Ra)

"Amen" definitely seems as originally Egyptian...It makes sense to me that the old/new testaments of Christianity would recycle old information/terms/etc or simply mistranslate them. Another good example of the bible using outside works is the epic of Gilgamesh.

The bible old or new is like a collective plagiarized older works/stories of various civilizations. For this reason I would speculate that the term Amen is most likely originally Egyptian…



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 03:25 PM
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Originally posted by Sly1one
Amenhotep I,II,III,IV

Amun Ra (aka Amen Ra)

"Amen" definitely seems as originally Egyptian...It makes sense to me that the old/new testaments of Christianity would recycle old information/terms/etc or simply mistranslate them. Another good example of the bible using outside works is the epic of Gilgamesh.

The bible old or new is like a collective plagiarized older works/stories of various civilizations. For this reason I would speculate that the term Amen is most likely originally Egyptian…


So where's the forensic, linguistic, or ethnological evidence that the Genesis flood story is a copy of the Epic of Gilgamesh?

Following your logic, we would have to assume that since the Sumerians were the first ordered civilization every similar story thereafter would have to be a copy of it. That is, that the other 150+ cultures, who have global flood stories are liars.

These stories originated through word of mouth, and there were nomadic peoples before the Sumerians who told this story. Mesopotamia having the resources, needs, and knowledge to write, wrote the story down FIRST to preserve it. That certainly does not mean the other tales are untrue, that's just preposterous.

Word of mouth stories have the ability to drastically be changed through the years. Gilgamesh wasn't even the only survivor of the flood. It's highly plausible that the story is so different from Genesis because it was changed to become more of a national, prideful hym to Sumeria, per se.

The Semitic language family includes the Near East region, and the Middle East region. So this includes Mesopotamia and Israel. The word Semitic is derived from the biblical character Shem. Shem, being one of Noah's sons after the flood. Also, the first settlers of the fertile crescent were nomadic peoples that came in from the south. SO, almost without a shadow of a doubt we can say that infact the, the Epic of Gilgamesh was a more pride-centric version of the Genesis flood story.


en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 18-3-2012 by CaptainNemo because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by vaelamin
 


It's technically pronounced "AH-mEEn" in Hebrew. Long E sound.

Not the same word or sound. Besides that, this is soooooo stupid. I could make you laugh at what some words we have in English mean in other languages but they sound exactly the same.


edit on 18-3-2012 by NOTurTypical because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by Sly1one
Amenhotep I,II,III,IV

Amun Ra (aka Amen Ra)

"Amen" definitely seems as originally Egyptian...It makes sense to me that the old/new testaments of Christianity would recycle old information/terms/etc or simply mistranslate them. Another good example of the bible using outside works is the epic of Gilgamesh.

The bible old or new is like a collective plagiarized older works/stories of various civilizations. For this reason I would speculate that the term Amen is most likely originally Egyptian…


Wow, lol, no. Watch "Mountain of Fire" on YouTube.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by NOTurTypical
 


Stupid? Of all the people notyourtypical would say such things. I hope for both are sakes and the religious world you are correct on this matter. Doesn't the bible teach us not to follow the ways of the crowd? isnt that the reason jesus died? Pilate decided to listen to the crowd and not to just reason or the law? Maybe if he would have listened to his own rules Jesus might still be with us today? What if noah would have followed the ways of the crowd? None of us would exist today. This word is very old and everyone says it after a prayer to the Lord but why? Jews,Muslims and Christians. Sure it might have different meanings but what is it's true meaning? As that Lonewolf fellow always rants about,paganism goes deep in all three of these religions.

As Klassified has posted on another topic.




The individual is handicapped by coming face to face with a conspiracy so monstrous he cannot believe it exists." J. Edgar Hoover


Oh how the Serpent might be laughing at us at how simple he might have doomed us all. Sure saying this word after the prayers to the Lord might not be hell worthy but it could be worthy of some form of judgement for never bothering to take the time to see why we say it. Lazyness could be the death of us all. I dont plan on speaking the name of this god anymore after my prayers. You may continue to do so but know i will be praying for you and thank the Lord i dont need to know your real name for my prayers to go through. God bless sir.



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