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Comet may have impacted Earth 13,000 years ago

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posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 07:47 PM
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This is from Space.com, scientists believe that a comet or large asteriod could have either impacted earth or have been a air explosion much like the one that took place in Tunguska in 1908 execpt this happened thousands of years ago.


This impact would have been powerful enough to melt the ground, and could have killed off many large mammals and humans. It may even have set off a period of unusual cold called the Younger Dryas that began at that time, researchers say



In addition to the Mexican site, the scientists have found signs of an impact in Canada, the United States, Russia, Syria and various sites in Europe. And all of these bits of evidence were found buried in a thin layer of rock that dates to precisely 12,900 years ago.


Scientists also believe this could be what caused the Earth to go through a mini ice-age at around the same time, which ultimately is what killed off the Mammoth, Saber Tooth Tiger, and various other mammals of the time. They also believe it could have been behind a population decline of humans in North America at the time.


At the same time that the impact may have taken place — 12,900 years ago — Earth was beginning a mini ice age. It is known that many large animals, such as the mammoth and the saber-toothed cat, did not survive this age. There's even evidence of a population decline in humans living in North America at the time, called the Clovis culture.



If a comet, which would have been traveling at about 30 miles per second, impacted Earth's atmosphere, it would have created a flash of extreme heat reaching about 3,000 to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit (1,600 to 2,200 degrees Celsius).


Pretty amazing stuff if you ask me, sciene is finding out new things about our planet, solar system and universe every day.

www.space.com...
ed it on 12-3-2012 by caf1550 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 07:56 PM
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Wow. I wish we would escavate along faultlines, I wonder how many intelligent civilisations have risrn and fallen, the animals of the time were far more verocious causing a stronger and more intelligent hunter.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 08:01 PM
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im sorry did i read that right? a mini ice age killed off the mammoths??? sorry im not having that one! the mammoth was made for the ice age, hence the long shaggy fur coat it always wore. now if you would of said the end of the ice age killed off the mammoth i might have took that one!



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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Micro spherules, as found all over Mars, and micro diamonds are evidence of large scale plasma strikes. So is the lack of a crater. So is evidence found thousands of miles apart, dating to the same time. Unlikely there were twenty comets impacting the Earth at once. However there could easily be multiple plasma strikes.

The Younger Dryas



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by SageBeno
 


The use of fire was the key separating aspect of the several humanoids that existed at the same time much more ancient than your suggestion. But consider that protein intake was difficult for hunter gatherers, and much time was needed to eat and digest raw meat, let alone the droughts in hunting. The early humanoids that mastered fire can eat 5 times as fast cooked meat, and they also gained a weapon from fire and protection from beasts while they sleep around fire so they could live on the ground instead of in trees. They began to become more 'upright' vehicles and the less time spent in-taking protein, growth was more efficient than other species of early man trying to get protein from fish or termites mounds or rodents and bugs. The human brain has the highest concentration of protein in the body, as such other mammals but the humanoids were able to have the time to develop their brains instead of running on instincts, free choice, cognitive thinking, communication, empathy.

To get more on the subject of community building cooperative sustainment, I believe harnessing fire was the genesis of civilizations, the community man, applying delegation of duties, for the good of the whole, in short, cooperation.

The point you make that some large and even worldwide ancient civilizations could be lost and unknown today is still valid, until proven otherwise.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 08:30 PM
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reply to post by adarmis
 


It just a theory since the Mammoth and Saber Tooth along with other animals pretty much didn't survive that long after this event took place


Whether the general mammoth population died out for climatic reasons or due to overhunting by humans is controversial.[14] Another theory suggests mammoths may have fallen victim to an infectious disease. A combination of climate change and hunting by humans may be a possible explanation for their extinction. Homo erectus is known to have consumed mammoth meat as early as 1.8 million years ago.[15] A site in Ukraine suggests Neanderthals built dwellings using mammoth bones



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 08:55 PM
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thats so old that theory gulf of mexico i think i read . glass in libyan desert glass plenty theories on that but but tungushka aka ucutia aka siberia was it a asteroid ? not what the locals record found that on nexus magazine ears ago just saying



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 09:08 PM
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i read a autopsy report as you do on a mammoth . it froze instantly to minus 155 with tropical plants in its gob .they could tell by the marbrlling on he meat just like the film the day after tomorrow i think velikovsky knew a bit to much maybe thats why they burned the first copy of worlds in collision conspiracy of science on youtube IS THE WORLD GROWING it used to be a massiive industry mammoth bones



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 09:11 PM
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i wonder if there was more then one impact
This comet is also known as the Clovis killer comet and was believed to have hit the ice cap over Canada.

A group of secondary impact craters called the Carolina bays all line up with the canadian impact.

There has been a theory that the canadian ice impact was not the only one and that there may have been other impacts from the same comet some over ice some on land and some at sea.

Going from space to ground in two seconds would have been a massive fireball even from a ice comet.
anyone there would not even had time to kiss there a** goodbye.

And the impact would likely have been nearly identical to a number of 50+ megaton nuclear bombs.

Think of a event like the Comet Shoemaker–Levy 9 on a smaller scale hitting earth instead of Jupiter with a number of impacts.
en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by geobro
 


Could have been an asteroid, more likely a comet. Things map out better if it was a small comet, (not that comets are large mind you). They travel faster, have looser geology, may be largely ice, atmospheric burn up is much more likely with comets than asteroids, and this is data supported by the simple fact where they coalesced, where they are coming from, and orbital dynamics.
edit on 12-3-2012 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 09:21 PM
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as a kid in 1972 yip im that old a 1.5 km bolide skimmed across the sky at 10.000 ft never forgot that sight .we could have gone the same way .hoagland mentions it in one of his books aha1101a i think but dont quote me on that 1 its been a long time since i read it



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by adarmis
 


They may have had a shaggy coat, but those found frozen in the north had in their stomachs, plants that grow way south of that area. This indicates they in fact lived in a warmer area than that in which they were found, not in an area of tundra or extreme cold.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 01:43 AM
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Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by SageBeno
 

The point you make that some large and even worldwide ancient civilizations could be lost and unknown today is still valid, until proven otherwise.


The idea of hungry flying space spaghetti monsters having lived and eaten all the dinosaurs, only dying after they exhausted their food source is still valid until proven otherwise.

Since we will never find evidence of either, I suppose we should keep both equally valid? Or should we say the fact there is zero evidence to support this invalidates it, and it is invalid until proven otherwise?



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 01:45 AM
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reply to post by adarmis
 


It's quite possible the change in climate killed off the food source the wolly mammoth relied upon, thus killing the wooly mammoths as well. The chain reactions of climate change are not always apparent at first glance.

It's also possible their fur made them perfectly adapted to their cold climate, and when it got colder they were unable to cope, and died. There are varying degrees of "cold".



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 06:51 AM
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reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


in 1912 a bank collapsed in siberia it was filled with mammoths and trees . reports say they fed the slay dogs on the meat . in the late 1800s an autopsy revealed that they froze INSTANTLY & were in perfect health . darwin & his followers brushed that one under the carpet



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 08:00 AM
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Earth is hit every day by stuff, but with NASA being as big as it is with billions of $ every year they still rely on amateur astronimers for 90% of thier findings, i think that the US government should share the wealth.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 10:06 PM
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reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


Not really, there is also the common sense test.

What would be more probable?



posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 11:26 PM
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Originally posted by geobro
reply to post by OccamsRazor04
 


in 1912 a bank collapsed in siberia it was filled with mammoths and trees . reports say they fed the slay dogs on the meat . in the late 1800s an autopsy revealed that they froze INSTANTLY & were in perfect health . darwin & his followers brushed that one under the carpet


Try doing a little research at NON pop-culture sites:


While frozen mammoth carcasses had been excavated by Europeans as early as 1728 (by German scientist Daniel Messerschmidt), the first mammoth fossil fully documented by modern science was discovered near the delta of the Lena River in 1799 by Ossip Schumachov, a Siberian hunter. Schumachov allowed it to thaw (a process taking several years) until he could retrieve the tusks for sale to the ivory trade in Yakutsk. He then abandoned the specimen, allowing it to largely decay before its recovery, possibly even having been partially devoured by modern wolves.[3][26]


As for being in "perfect health" when frozen:


Stories abound about frozen mammoth carcasses that were still edible once defrosted, but the original sources indicate the carcasses were, in fact, terribly decayed, and the stench so unbearable that only the dogs accompanying the finders, and wild scavengers, showed any interest in the flesh.[34]


And as for being "instantly" or "quick frozen":


Preserved frozen remains of woolly mammoths, with much soft tissue remaining, have been found in the northern parts of Siberia. This is a rare occurrence, essentially requiring the animal to have been buried rapidly in liquid or semi-solids such as silt, mud and icy water, which then froze. This may have occurred in a number of ways. Mammoths may have been trapped in bogs or quicksands and either died of starvation or exposure, or drowning if they sank under the surface. The evidence of undigested food in the stomach and seed pods still in the mouth of many of the specimens suggests neither starvation nor exposure are likely. The maturity of this ingested vegetation places the time period in autumn rather than in spring when flowers would be expected.[27] The animals may have fallen through ice into small ponds or potholes, entombing them. Many are certainly known to have been killed in rivers, perhaps through being swept away by river floods. In one location, by the Berelekh River in Yakutia in Siberia, more than 8,000 bones from at least 140 individual mammoths have been found in a single spot, apparently having been swept there by the current.[28][29]


Source: Woolly Mommoth Frozen Remains

The "instantly frozen" idea, was debunked a long time ago.



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