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Scottish Islands Shaking!

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posted on Mar, 2 2012 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by artistpoet
 


i think the thames barriers was build for the same reason .
and if the landmass is moving then that would explain the frequent small tremmor's that we get .
scotland would be on its way to be come another switzerland and london would disappear




posted on Mar, 2 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by purplemer
 

I would not worry too much as these quakes though felt are very small 2.8 2.1 for exaple and quakes are more fequent than most realise
Which Island do you live on - I love Mull - also I once lived in the Orkneys for for a few years



posted on Mar, 2 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by tom.farnhill
reply to post by artistpoet
 


i think the thames barriers was build for the same reason .
and if the landmass is moving then that would explain the frequent small tremmor's that we get .
scotland would be on its way to be come another switzerland and london would disappear


Oh dear no more house of parliment what a shame

I am going to buy a pair of skis and a kilt methinks



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 06:51 AM
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reply to post by angelchemuel
 


You asked the question on Quake Watch if the Highland Boundary Fault was connected to the area where these quakes had occured, which is on the Great Glen Fault.

I don't believe the two join, although I can't be certain. I know that the Great Glen Fault runs down from Sneckie (Inverness) to Fort William and then out through Donegal and Clew Bay (not 25 miles from me). The fascinating thing is that although now divided by the Mid Atlantic Ridge, this fault continued on through America. There are surprising similarities between plants on the West Coast of Ireland and Newfoundland Coast.

The Highland Boundary fault is further down and marks the divide below Perth where the Sassenachs begin (Lowlanders - later applied to the English)

Well I guess it already is a little swarm as there are probably smaller quakes popping off that are not getting recorded. I don't see any particular reason to be concerned as this is all small and in any case a bigger earthquake in that region is unlikely to affect much except a few sheep and the odd lone piper playing melancholy airs perched on a rock above the the misty valleys.
(I tell you that is a stirring sound if you have not heard it. You either love it or hate it!)



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 07:00 AM
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reply to post by tom.farnhill
 



landmass is moving


The landmass is always moving - pretty much everywhere. I believe the UK rate is about 1 cm a year north east or thereabouts and somewhere in the dark recesses of my ancient mind the tip figure is 1/2 inch per century but don't take my word for it as I may have the two muddled up (or even just wrong).



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 07:57 AM
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reply to post by bigyin
 


That would really mess up the proposed water pipeline from Scotland to the East of England...



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by bigyin
Great news .... hopefully the shaking will break Scotland away from England and we can see some clear blue water between the the two ..... just in time for the coming referendum


Have a star from an Englishman who agrees



Originally posted by tom.farnhill
reply to post by GonzoSinister
 


i seem to remember quite some time ago , reading that since the ice age that scotland was rising and that southern england was slowly sinking .
if i am wrong i am sure someone will tell me


I also remember being taught at school that the northern part of Britain is rising due to the Earth's crust regaining it's shape after the meting of the glaciers and the weight of them being removed.

ETA; It's called Post Glacial Rebound

edit on 3/3/12 by yellowbeard because: added name of PGR



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


yes i agree but it was the tilting of the landmass after the weight of the ice had gone that i was refering to.



posted on Mar, 3 2012 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by artistpoet
 


ha ha yes but i think you will need to learn to yodel . and skiing in a kilt does not sound like fun ..lol



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 09:14 AM
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and there's more!

2012/03/04 23:23:53.7 56.245 -4.768 3 2.8 3 ARROCHAR,ARGYLL/BUTE FELT ARROCHAR...
2012/03/04 22:58:08.8 57.744 -4.646 7 1.6 DINGWALL,HIGHLAND 15KM NW OF DINGWALL
2012/03/04 08:34:06.7 56.233 -4.826 2 1.8 3 ARROCHAR,ARGYLL/BUTE FELT ARROCHAR
BGS

rainbows
Jane



posted on Mar, 5 2012 @ 12:15 PM
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Well, I have just heard back from my friend in the oil industry. There is no fraking going on in that area and wont be due to the geology of the area, there is nothing to extract "this time it's mother nature!"

Heck, not sure if that's a good thing or bad thing...would have been easier to blame fraking!

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 02:09 PM
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OK...these are om the same fault line as the Argulle and Butte EQ's
This area had one on the 26th February which made the news

2012/03/14 00:01:48.0 55.096 -7.557 2 0.7 2 BUNCRANA,IRELAND FELT MILFORD
2012/03/13 21:22:03.1 55.112 -7.529 3 1.0 2 BUNCRANA,IRELAND FELT MILFORD
BGS

May be Puterman is right...when is he ever wrong
maybe the Great Glenn is indeed seperating?

Rainbows
Jane




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