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Dead for 32,000 Years, an Arctic Plant Is Revived

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posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 12:40 PM
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reply to post by ThreeSistersofLoveandLigh
 


now that you mention it Im sure I have seen this before too , in the Voynich manuscript , I will have a lool and make sure , because if thats true then WOW the implications !




posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


It reminds me of the movie Ice Age with the prehistoric squirrel and acorn.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 12:54 PM
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When people post about potential dangers of some long extinct plant species, let's not forget that there are plenty of species around us that changed little over millions of years (cf cockroaches).

If it does contain some kind of virus that we didn't think even existed, that would be another story.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by IkNOwSTuff
How do we know this is a good thing?

What if this plant turns out be be evil?

For instance it pollinates in ways we dont know and wreaks havoc in the local environment, displacing existing flora and leads to a massive die off of animal species that have adapted to the current ecosystem.


Am I the only one who read the entire article and caught the following?


Tragedy has now struck the Russian team. Dr. Gilichinksy, its leader, was hospitalized with an asthma attack and unable to respond to questions, his daughter Yana said on Friday. On Saturday, Dr. Price reported that Dr. Gilichinsky had died of a heart attack.


Could his asthma attack and subsequent death happen from exposure to this prehistoric plant? That is too freaky.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by Absum!
 


You are right, I checked Russian sources and he's dead.

R.I.P.

Anything's possible.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by Absum!
 


I don't know if it's the plant itself that's the problem. As someone with allergies for me it's always fungal spores that are the problem. I would bet in addition to finding 32,000 year old squirrel remains and this plant, they blundered into 32,000 year old fungal spores. Those would be more likely than viruses or bacteria to still be able to cause trouble after all this time. They don't have to be reproductively viable to trigger a nasty allergic reaction.
edit on 21-2-2012 by SheeplFlavoredAgain because: Typos



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 

It's my understanding that we're to get a baby Mastadon by years end. Seriously.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 01:48 PM
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I understand the need for precaution and this isn't an educated opinion on this, but I don't think this particular 32k year old flower is going to kill us all, or anyone, or give anyone allergies. Parasites need a host and I think most of them (bacterial, virii, etc) die after being exposed to air for a short time.

As for it being an invasive species, well... look around. Plants are everywhere, they are all invasive species. This ancient flower would have to compete with everything else that survived human colonization of the planet. Matter of fact, we are probably the most invasive species.

So pardon me if I'm not worried about it like a lot of people here.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


I didn't get through all of the posts, so this might have already been brought up. The original article states that the seed was not actually in a squirrel, but was rather in the squirrels den, stored for later consumption. The seed itself isn't actually grown, it was the scientists taking material from the fruit that surrounded the seed, and generating a plant from that. They also determined from seeing how the plant turned out, that the plant is nearly identical to a plant that exists there in the wild already with some slight differences that are easy to overlook of not carefully inspecting it.

I think this is a great find and I think it's something that we will be seeing more and more of as permafrost starts melting. The first time we're able to find material buried for hundreds of thousands of years and get it to grow again to have plants we've never seen before, then we'll really have something. There's always the risk of it being an invasive species, but there's also potential for new medicines to be made from them as well. It's a double sided coin.

The more the permafrost melts, the more things we're going to find. It'll be interesting to see just what those things are, and it's great that we live in a world that is connected with the internet so we can all find out about these amazing discoveries together.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 02:09 PM
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I can not help thinking this is the squirrel that they found...




Great find.Im stunned that such thing could survive that long myself.
Who knows maybe we will find even more in years to come



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


Can they prove its 32,000 years old... or did they just pull that number out of a hat.

I do not believe this evolution indoctrination and it frustrates to see gullible people accepting these figures.




posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by IkNOwSTuff
 


What if this plant turns out be be evil?


your kidding right? lol



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 03:15 PM
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Oh my goodness, amazing! And so beautiful, too. Thank you for sharing this.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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Ok thats just weird, I've been getting signals from the plant to take over Italy and rename it chicken..



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by Corruption Exposed
 


Sorry I didn't add anything after I posting the flower pic, was in a hurry for work,


An entire flower from the Ice Age has been resurrected by Russian scientists in a pioneering experiment that could pave the way for the revival of other species including the mammoth. They say the Silene stenophylla is the oldest plant ever to be regenerated and is fertile, producing white flowers and viable seeds. The raw material for the project was fruit tissues from an Ice Age squirrel's chamber, a burrow containing fruit and seeds that had been stuck in the Siberian permafrost for over 30,000 years. The Russians said the experiment proves that permafrost serves as a natural depository for ancient life forms. They published their findings in Tuesday's "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences" of the United States. "We consider it essential to continue permafrost studies in search of an ancient genetic pool, that of pre-existing life, which hypothetically has long since vanished from the earth's surface," the scientists said in the article. Canadian researchers had earlier regenerated some significantly younger plants from seeds found in burrows. Svetlana Yashina of the Institute of Cell Biophysics of the Russian Academy Of Sciences, who led the regeneration effort, said the revived plant looked very similar to its modern version, which still grows in the same area in northeastern Siberia. "It's a very viable plant, and it adapts really well," she told The Associated Press in a telephone interview from the Russian town of Pushchino where her lab is located. She voiced hope the team could continue its work and regenerate more plant species. The Russian research team recovered the fruit after investigating dozens of fossil burrows hidden in ice deposits on the right bank of the lower Kolyma River in northeastern Siberia, the sediments dating back 30,000-32,000 years. The burrows were located 125 feet below the present surface in layers containing bones of large mammals, such as mammoth, woolly rhinoceros, bison, horse and deer. The group says the study has demonstrated that tissue can survive ice conservation for tens of thousands of years, opening the way to the possible resurrection of Ice Age mammals. "If we are lucky, we can find some frozen squirrel tissue," Dr Gubin told The Associated Press. "And this path could lead us all the way to mammoth." Japanese scientists are already searching in the same area for mammoth remains, but Dr Gubin voiced hope that the Russians will be the first to find some frozen animal tissue that could be used for regeneration. "It's our land, we will try to get them first," he said. So maybe, just maybe, we'll someday end up having that "best woolly mammoth caliber" discussion after all...


www.fieldandstream.com... es/2012/02/russian-scientists-resurrect-ice-age-flower

I think one day we are going to play around with extinct species of whatever we find an resurrect them, and say Oooops we went to far. lol



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by bpg131313
 


I was going to mention that too. According to Wikipedia, it's an extant species (extant, not extinct!)

There were differences, but probably observable ones in the course of 32000 years of evolution that separate it from its contemporary kin. I mean, if we observed fully intact, live humans of 32000 years ago, there would probably be slight physical differences between them and our modern selves. I'm talking slight, nothing major.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 05:40 PM
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Makes me wonder.. how do they know it's 32,000 years old... O_O

Interesting indeed.



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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Wow that's B.A. With this kind of understanding of genetics, there's no doubt in my mind that scientists have cloned humans by now. Honestly its gonna be an interesting future (if there is one).



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by missiongal
 


that was a joke... really mean nothing ...





Hello observer1, I know from previous threads written by you that your contactees have told you that the world has every plant available to cure every disease in the world,


I think you're mistaken me for someone else...
edit on 21/12/2010 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 21 2012 @ 07:59 PM
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it didnt say "Carcas" it said burrow




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