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Light creates gravity. Here's how.

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posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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Is it possible that light creates gravity? Photons travel at 300,000 km/s and bombard the earth. Wouldn't something travelling at that speed and hitting any object, regardless of light's masslessness have some kind of effect?

If light had mass, travelling at 300,000 km/s, it would hurt when it hit. But since it doesn't have mass, it's bombardment doesn't hurt, but it doesn't let you jump very high either.

When light comes into contact with matter, it hits it at 300,000 km/s and reflects at 300,000 km/s. Imagine what this looks like at the atomic level. In order for light to reflect and maintain its speed, It must first be absorbed by a body and then re-emitted. So, I can see how electrons might actually grab on to the light, whip it around the nucleus of the atom and then launch it back into space. At the point of the electron's acceleration, (in order to maintain light speed constant) and at the point of the electron's down to earth (no pun intended) direction, gravity is created. The electron would only speed up to light speed on its downward motion. As the light being held by the electron returns to the surface, the light lets go of the electron and the electron returns to its base speed.

Every atom has electrons that has a magnetic repulsive effect on the electrons in close proximity. When one electron moves in one atom, so do the electrons in the adjacent atom. This is how light creates gravity even on the dark side of the earth. Gravity is actually the electron's accelerating influence on the atom as it travels downward to the earth or to the center of the body.

There's a lot more to it, and a lot of calculations to be made, to completely describe the process, but we can let the rest of that unfold in the following discussion.




posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


so what's a black hole?


+11 more 
posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Your logic is flawed..

Or have you seen anyone floating around at night, ever ?



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:42 AM
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Originally posted by Gwampo
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


so what's a black hole?


A lot of matter. Being in the center of the galaxy (the main black hole) is in contact with a proportional amount of light. This causes the electrons in the body to be evenly influenced by the light so that the electrons never spin back up, but instead absorb all light.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:43 AM
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Originally posted by H1ght3chHippie
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Your logic is flawed..

Or have you seen anyone floating around at night, ever ?


No I covered that in the OP. The force is indirectly caused by light. What's actually doing the pulling is the electrons.

On the dark side of the Earth, the electrons still move toward the center of the Earth at the same accelerating rate as they move on the light side of the Earth.
edit on 20-2-2012 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:46 AM
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editted out
edit on 20-2-2012 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:47 AM
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Wow that is fascinating and I thank you because i never thought of it like that. I have been studying how photons in particle accelerators create gamma radiation when they strike electrons.

It has already been noted that this photon effect (I believe it is called the Compton effect?) also results in a small but perceptible dip in gravity. I can't recall the source but I did read of it in a reputable research paper.

Bravo for helping to explain it.

What follows from that is that gravity needs light, therefore gravity is an effect or a result of plasma radiated from from stars striking matter.

That then raises the next interesting point which is if gravity is an effect depending upon light then how come black holes have massive gravity holes. That would contradict the theory. I am interested to hear some theretical answers....

Bravo in any case for an interesting post



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:50 AM
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i think your theory can be resolved when you realize that all matter is densely cohered light.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:52 AM
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Originally posted by metalshredmetal
i think your theory can be resolved when you realize that all matter is densely cohered light.


What do you mean?



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:54 AM
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At first I thought: "Light has no impulse, as its mass is zero."
But then I thought about Radiation Pressure, resulting from E = h*ν, with m = h*ν / c^2 as an equivalent to "real" mass. It is absolutely tiny, but detectable.

But nethertheless, light does not create gravity.

Molecules "catching" photons, having them orbiting the nucleus? Nope. Even if that would be true, there is no mechanism to emitt them only in one or two directions, so you would get an indifferent emission with a sum of zero in its vectors, so there would be no preferred direction of movement of this molecule.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:00 AM
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Originally posted by sy.gunson


That then raises the next interesting point which is if gravity is an effect depending upon light then how come black holes have massive gravity holes. That would contradict the theory. I am interested to hear some theretical answers....



The supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy has a relatively symmetrical amount of light coming into contact with it. Since light causes electrons to accelerate on their downward trajectory and the lose speed on their upward trajectory as the light releases its grip on them, a body with a symmetrical influence of light on all sides would cause the electrons in that body to be perfect absorbers.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 

I think your reaching past what is scientifically acceptable, and I like it! You will have to explain why two high tides are a result thought. And, is there any scientific experiments that can be done to support your theory. Like, can you take a magnetic reading around the globe, day and night, and see if there is a difference? Also, could there be a hidden sun having a effect on your theory?



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by Gwampo
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


so what's a black hole?



A massive concentration of light particals?



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Photons are energy, and energy has no mass because its vibrations are unrestrained and unbound.

This is related to a theory I have that if we were to focus the energy in our bodies enough, we could actually burn with a touch or knock things backward, similar to a shot from an air gun. That's why martial arts is essential: without the proper conditioning, such channeling and focusing of energy could cause deterioration within the untrained flesh.

But no, gravity is not light. Gravity, I think, is largely related to magnetics. But don't quote me on that.

edit on CMondayam040405f05America/Chicago20 by Starchild23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:05 AM
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So how do you explain the moons effect on gravity, it receives aprox the same amount of light but has just 1/6 the gravity of earth?



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


i mean: matter is light.

quantum physics hints at this very much.

different particles are all just different expressions of a photon.

here's a piece of the puzzle:

Is the Electron a Photon with Toroidal Topology?
by J.G. Williamson and M.B. van der Mark
Glasgow University, Department of Electronics & Electrical Engineering,
Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland
Philips Research Laboratories,
Prof. Holstlaan 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven, The Netherlands



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by ManFromEurope
At first I thought: "Light has no impulse, as its mass is zero."
But then I thought about Radiation Pressure, resulting from E = h*ν, with m = h*ν / c^2 as an equivalent to "real" mass. It is absolutely tiny, but detectable.

But nethertheless, light does not create gravity.

Molecules "catching" photons, having them orbiting the nucleus? Nope.


No. Photons catching electrons.


Even if that would be true, there is no mechanism to emitt them only in one or two directions, so you would get an indifferent emission with a sum of zero in its vectors,


I am not quite sure what you mean by "sum of zero in its vectors", but as light hits the "top" of the electron, it grabs onto the electron, causing the electron to accelerate towards light speed and then as the light changes direction, it releases its influence on the electron as it reflects at the same angle it left at. So the electron accelerates on the downard motion and decelerates on the upward motion. It is slowest at the "top".

so there would be no preferred direction of movement of this molecule.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by mileysubet
So how do you explain the moons effect on gravity, it receives aprox the same amount of light but has just 1/6 the gravity of earth?


It has less electrons.



posted on Feb, 20 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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If light is just a energy wave in a medium like a sheet of cloth, then a black hole would be like a hoover sucking up that cloth and thus moving the obects including the waves closer to it. Its the only way i can imagine how waves and gravity might work.

waves travel through a medium, gravity essentially eats up and stretches that medium




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