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Gravity and time perception.

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posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 01:59 AM
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Actually to be honest, Time is a big lie.


We make it up in our head to explain cycles that exist in our biology...


So it wouldn't matter if you lived on Neptune or a different star... Humans would live on average for 70 "earth years"


Time is Ticking fellas.




posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:01 AM
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Originally posted by ManFromEurope
Gravity does affect time:





The effect is REALLY small: In 300km height it is about 1 millisecond per year. You will not live percievably longer if you fly a lot. Thats only the effect of those boring flights and the check-ins and -outs..


I totally agree about the boring flights. Now what if we were traveling say like the voyager crafts wouldn't that throw some crazy calculations out there due to the various effects of gravity caused by its proximity to some of the other planets and then shooting off into interstellar space where gravity is (should) be very minimal?



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:06 AM
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this may or may not be cool for you, theres other related videos on the side as well, if you got the time to check it out/skim through...

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...



i dont know if this relates at all but one thing ive personally wondered about, is the experience of an astronaut chilling in space, say between the earth and the moon.. because they would be in space, and the planetery bodies surrounding them would be moving and rotating through space very quickly..earth moves around sun 67,000 miles per hour,.,. solar system together moving around the galaxy 490,000 miles per hour...

so a person chilling in space, how would these speeds of extreme movement effect them.,,. are the objects so large and lack of reference points not allow them to perceive the crazy speeds,, or are the forces of gravity, and the system so stable that the space between the bodies is mechanically locked in a way...



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by litterbaux
reply to post by swampcricket
 


I have a feeling gravity is its own dimension. Then again, if you study theoretical physics for as long as I have it will drive you crazy, so crazy you will just grasp onto any straw that might be the answer.

Have fun on your journey, keep me updated if you figure anything out.



That is exactly what I believe and I call it the 5th dimension. The Gravity dimension is outside of our dimension, yet gravity is also contained in every single atom in our Universe. Inner and Outer Gravity!

The 5th dimension of gravity also accompanies another 4 dimensions of SpaceTime, parallel to the one we know, and on and on.
Gravity is the ultimate cohesive factor of all of the Cosmos, spatially and temporally.
The Cosmos is an endless series of repetitive 4-D Universes, pulled together by Cosmic Gravity, in a timeless Mobius loop.

I'm not quite crazy yet, (afaik), but I'm writing a book on this before I flip my coin!



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:10 AM
link   

Originally posted by ImaFungi
this may or may not be cool for you, theres other related videos on the side as well, if you got the time to check it out/skim through...

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...



i dont know if this relates at all but one thing ive personally wondered about, is the experience of an astronaut chilling in space, say between the earth and the moon.. because they would be in space, and the planetery bodies surrounding them would be moving and rotating through space very quickly..earth moves around sun 67,000 miles per hour,.,. solar system together moving around the galaxy 490,000 miles per hour...

so a person chilling in space, how would these speeds of extreme movement effect them.,,. are the objects so large and lack of reference points not allow them to perceive the crazy speeds,, or are the forces of gravity, and the system so stable that the space between the bodies is mechanically locked in a way...



Very good question would you relate that to say riding in a car going 200mph the car in this case being the gravitational tug between the earth and the moon locking you in place? I hope y'all can understand the analogy.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:12 AM
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Originally posted by Starling

Originally posted by litterbaux
reply to post by swampcricket
 


I have a feeling gravity is its own dimension. Then again, if you study theoretical physics for as long as I have it will drive you crazy, so crazy you will just grasp onto any straw that might be the answer.

Have fun on your journey, keep me updated if you figure anything out.



That is exactly what I believe and I call it the 5th dimension. The Gravity dimension is outside of our dimension, yet gravity is also contained in every single atom in our Universe. Inner and Outer Gravity!



The 5th dimension of gravity also accompanies another 4 dimensions of SpaceTime, parallel to the one we know, and on and on.
Gravity is the ultimate cohesive factor of all of the Cosmos, spatially and temporally.
The Cosmos is an endless series of repetitive 4-D Universes, pulled together by Cosmic Gravity, in a timeless Mobius loop.

I'm not quite crazy yet, (afaik), but I'm writing a book on this before I flip my coin!


Would gravity be the so called "dark matter"?



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:20 AM
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reply to post by swampcricket
 


I think I read somewhere that the gravity of planets etc bends light, so if light is bending, its taking longer to get where its going than if it was going in a straight line.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by ZeussusZ
 


I thought only black holes could bend light?



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:24 AM
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reply to post by swampcricket
 


No because matter is in our 3 dimensional plane of existance.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:27 AM
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reply to post by swampcricket
 


Water can bend light.





posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:28 AM
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reply to post by swampcricket
 


Firstly, to understand Gravity, you have to understand a thing called spacetime. Spacetime is just like our normal space except, instead of having three cardinal directions (3 dimensions), you have four, with one of those directions being called time.

Due to the constancy of the speed of light, we can say that 1 second = 386,000 km in the direction, or along the axis of, time. This allows us to measure ALL dimensions with the same scale i.e: in meters (or feet for those in the US) and we can do some real world maths now that everything is in the same units.

Gravity bends the underlying structure of spacetime, compressing it in as you get closer to the source of the gravitation. Alternately, gravitation could also be understood as a compression of spacetime that will change the angle of velocity of anything traveling through it.

This is interpreted by us as if there were a force is acting to deflect the path of an object (i.e: changing its angular velocity). Hence gravity itself isn't so much a "force" as it is a bending of the path of travel of objects caused by the compression of spacetime.

If spacetime is compressed, there is a dilation effect that makes time appear to pass more rapidly close to the gravitational source.

The amount of time compressed by the gravity of the Earth is very small and so you would need a highly accurate clock just to determine that there was a time dilation effect.

As I understand it, one experiment used a pair of synchronized atomic clocks, one of which was taken from ground level, up to the top of a large skyscraper and was then returned some significant time later to ground level. The clocks when compared showed that the clock at ground level had gained a tiny compared with the one that was raised to the top of the building.


edit on 31/1/2012 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:30 AM
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Originally posted by litterbaux
reply to post by swampcricket
 


No because matter is in our 3 dimensional plane of existance.


So then what binds the 3 dimensional plane and the fourth dimensional plane. Nice straw pic that's called refraction.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:30 AM
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Originally posted by swampcricket

Originally posted by Starling

Originally posted by litterbaux
reply to post by swampcricket
 


I have a feeling gravity is its own dimension. Then again, if you study theoretical physics for as long as I have it will drive you crazy, so crazy you will just grasp onto any straw that might be the answer.

Have fun on your journey, keep me updated if you figure anything out.



That is exactly what I believe and I call it the 5th dimension. The Gravity dimension is outside of our dimension, yet gravity is also contained in every single atom in our Universe. Inner and Outer Gravity!



The 5th dimension of gravity also accompanies another 4 dimensions of SpaceTime, parallel to the one we know, and on and on.
Gravity is the ultimate cohesive factor of all of the Cosmos, spatially and temporally.
The Cosmos is an endless series of repetitive 4-D Universes, pulled together by Cosmic Gravity, in a timeless Mobius loop.

I'm not quite crazy yet, (afaik), but I'm writing a book on this before I flip my coin!


Would gravity be the so called "dark matter"?



Yes, I think so.
And the other mysterious Dark Energy would be the alternate 4-D Universe, still perceptible from this one., but back to front! That's why it's 'dark'...to us!
Waddya think?



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:35 AM
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Originally posted by chr0naut
reply to post by swampcricket
 


Gravity bends the underlying structure of spacetime, compressing it as you get closer to the source of the gravitation. Alternately, gravitation could be understood as a compression of spacetime that will change the angle of velocity of anything traveling through it and this will be interpreted by us as if a force is acting to change the path of an object.

If spacetime is compressed, there is a dilation effect that makes time pass more rapidly close to the gravitational source.

The amount of time compressed by the gravity of the Earth is very small and so you would need a highly accurate clock just to determine that there was a time dilation effect.

As I understand it, the experiment used a pair of synchronized atomic clocks, one of which was taken from ground level, up to the top of a large skyscraper and was then returned some significant time later to ground level. The clocks when compared showed that the clock at ground level had gained a tiny compared with the one that was raised to the top of the building.



No the clock experiment was only a 12 inch difference I know this because I saw it on I think Through the Wormhole. That's what I am claiming as my source. But then so in essence if you could bend space/time with a strong gravitational force you could effectively travel to "far" away places without the need of an exotic type of propulsion system and therefore no worrying about the speed of light travel theory. Correct me of I'm wrong which I probably am.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:36 AM
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Originally posted by swampcricket

Originally posted by DAZ21
If you fly around the earth fast enough, you can slow ageing.


The space shuttle orbited earth at around 17,500 mph did that slow the aging of the astronauts on board?

science.ksc.nasa.gov...


The altitude that they traveled at slowed their clocks in relation to ones that stayed on the ground but the velocity that they traveled at relative to the clocks on the ground would have sped the clocks up by a small amount.

Thing is, the gravitational dilation would probably have exceeded the compression of timespace due to velocity.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:40 AM
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reply to post by swampcricket
 


I think they can see a star behind a star with gravitational microlensing.

indianapublicmedia.org...



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:41 AM
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Originally posted by swampcricket

Originally posted by Starling

Originally posted by litterbaux
reply to post by swampcricket
 


I have a feeling gravity is its own dimension. Then again, if you study theoretical physics for as long as I have it will drive you crazy, so crazy you will just grasp onto any straw that might be the answer.

Have fun on your journey, keep me updated if you figure anything out.



That is exactly what I believe and I call it the 5th dimension. The Gravity dimension is outside of our dimension, yet gravity is also contained in every single atom in our Universe. Inner and Outer Gravity!



The 5th dimension of gravity also accompanies another 4 dimensions of SpaceTime, parallel to the one we know, and on and on.
Gravity is the ultimate cohesive factor of all of the Cosmos, spatially and temporally.
The Cosmos is an endless series of repetitive 4-D Universes, pulled together by Cosmic Gravity, in a timeless Mobius loop.

I'm not quite crazy yet, (afaik), but I'm writing a book on this before I flip my coin!


Would gravity be the so called "dark matter"?


No, but that's why we speculate there is "dark matter" that we can't see. The gravity that causes galaxies to form requires 99% more matter than we have observed. Hence this matter must be "dark".



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:43 AM
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Originally posted by chr0naut

Originally posted by swampcricket

Originally posted by DAZ21
If you fly around the earth fast enough, you can slow ageing.


The space shuttle orbited earth at around 17,500 mph did that slow the aging of the astronauts on board?

science.ksc.nasa.gov...


The altitude that they traveled at slowed their clocks in relation to ones that stayed on the ground but the velocity that they traveled at relative to the clocks on the ground would have sped the clocks up by a small amount.

Thing is, the gravitational dilation would probably have exceeded the compression of timespace due to velocity.



Is there a formula to calculate the gravitational dilation versus the time space compression due to velocity? That would be fun to tinker with.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:47 AM
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reply to post by chr0naut
 


its not "dark" its just bending space time to such a degree that we can't see it.



posted on Jan, 31 2012 @ 02:59 AM
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each form of life is a different perspective of the planet. Time perspectives. You have a time, what are you doing with it? You never know when big mother is going to spy on you



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