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Alien artifacts in our solar system

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posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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There is a lot of opinion on how we will finally contact ET, if ever. I recently thought about it and and came up with the following conclusion. The BEST chance we have for finding proof of extraterrestrials at least in a human lifetime, would be the discovery of an alien artifact, a probe, or an installation, in our solar system. My idea for the best candidate would be a probe that came here possibly millions or even billions of years ago and is still in orbit around the sun or possibly sits on the surface of a planet or moon. There are millions of photos from Voyager, the Mars missions, the Gallileo probe and some of the newer missions, that might contain an image of such an artifact. I think our chances of finding something like this are at least as good as the SETI programs chances. So I did some searching and came up with one that is very intriguing



The Mars "golf ball"

This is very unusual, it may be a dune but I dont think I have ever seen one with such symmetry.It is several hundred feet across, and I would love to see a hirise picture of this.





I am sure when we send probes with ultra high resolution to the Jovian and Saturnian moons, we might happen upon something that does not belong there. Also I am wondering if any asteroidal or cometary bodies might have an orbit that could betray an interstellar origin, I would look for one that has an orbit so weird it couldn't have been captured naturally. There could be an abandoned base somewhere as well. OK I just wanted to put this out there.




posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:07 PM
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I like the Phobos anomaly



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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There are millions of photos from Voyager, the Mars missions, the Gallileo probe and some of the newer missions, that might contain an image of such an artifact.


In that case, we'll never know.

Anything TPTB find would not be disclosed to us.

I agree with your post though. There must be something on one of those planets out there.

But it's up to we the people to find it though.


edit on 14-1-2012 by SilentE because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by openminded2011
This is very unusual, it may be a dune but I dont think I have ever seen one with such symmetry.It is several hundred feet across, and I would love to see a hirise picture of this.

OK, here is photo PSP_007230_2170.





posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


What a clear,beautiful picture!

Looks like wind spread dunes,in a crater.

Edit to add:

Could that be Ice also,as flat as it is, next to the dunes?




edit on 14-1-2012 by sonnny1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by sonnny1
 


No ice on that region, that's just an extremely fine blueish powder that exists in several places on Mars and that has also been photographed by the rovers on the surface.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by openminded2011
 


If by definition...."aliens" and you believe we landed on the moon......yes in short, we are surrounded by alien space junk...
Hence once we set foot on the moon, we became aliens....by definition...



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


So is that a true or false colour image? If it's true colour, it is fascinating.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


It's an approximate true colour, because HiRISE doesn't have a red, a green and a blue filter to make a real RGB image, it only has an infrared, a red and green+blue fliter, so they make what they call a "synthetic blue" with the green+blue channel and the red channel.

From what I have seen, when compared with ground photos from the rovers, the colours are not much different from the real colours, but we can never really know.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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Yeah, i'd have to say, the picture looks awesome. Although it looks nature made. We have natural beauties here that dont fall far from this picture. Looks like the work of some major wind after somewhat new impact spot. When i say new i'm thinking space wise. Couple thousand yrs, maybe a hundred. Who really knows. lol
Which brings me to, if space is endless, billions and billions of years old and time is limitless. Having no real clue to its beginning or no other dimension other than it being there and now found. I mean do we even know if time, our universe, and everything inbetween has a start date? Looking at whats come and gone here on earth, a insignificant spec in our universe, through Archaeological discoveries. Which as far as humanity goes, they seem to keep getting earlier and earlier in the earths timeline with every new find. Making me think, They probably are out there but we'll probably never know due to our vast universe. I look at it like this. Put one guy in Cali. one in Florida. Niether have any knowledge of the other. With our tech. now, what are the odds of the two coming face to face in there lifetime. Multiply that by infinite.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


I thought the colours seemed a bit "enhanced", especially the blue. There is that many false colour images of the solar system floating around it's hard to know when you are looking at a true colour image, unless it states. Most of the true colour images I have seen from Mars have been the rusty / copper colour types (orange through my telescope), so I was dazzled by the blues.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by WeMoveUnseen
I like the Phobos anomaly


A good point, probably more than you intended. The voids in Phobos were accidently discovered and seen as a natural but very puzzling condition of the little moon. Couple that with the also accepted as natural but very puzzling grooves on Phobos and you have the best argument for intelligent actions to date. But we only can make that judgment because those two key clues slipped by NASA and were released because they didn't pick up on them at the onset. That taught them a lesson. Malin was engaged thereafter to scrutinize images and withhold any that was deemed not ready for prime time.

As to the idea of alien probes being out there? Sure, I'll bet on it. By the dozens around the solar system. But given that info goes through several filters human and computer before any of it is released, it is not likely that some kid sitting in his room is going to find a definite alien probe via his Apple.
edit on 14-1-2012 by Aliensun because: My comma quota was over quota



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 01:57 PM
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Originally posted by Aliensun
But we only can make that judgment because those two key clues slipped by NASA and were released because they didn't pick up on them at the onset. That taught them a lesson. Malin was engaged thereafter to scrutinize images and withhold any that was deemed not ready for prime time.

Could you explain that a little better? Thanks in advance.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by Aliensun
But we only can make that judgment because those two key clues slipped by NASA and were released because they didn't pick up on them at the onset. That taught them a lesson. Malin was engaged thereafter to scrutinize images and withhold any that was deemed not ready for prime time.

Could you explain that a little better? Thanks in advance.


Yes. Phobos has a large percentage of what has been called voids. This was know from early on from the Viking Orbiter probes. There was much discussion about it in NASA at the time,. (I'll bet that most of that has pulled.) First, they thought it might be ice, having a weight per mass less that rock by about half. But that meant a lot of ice! Finally, they concluded that it was composed of debris that clumped together there in that orbit with these voids inbetween. The problem is that the Viking orbiters showed definite ridges that meant that the whole body seemed to be once a larger chunk itself of something like--heaven forbid--a larger body (maybe a planet?). So the mystery of the voids was never adequately solved and they don't want to talk about it. Or release the thousands of images taken of the little moon since the Vikings.

The key to the whole business of Phobos is with the grooves. And again, they have discussed and discussed what has caused the grooves some of which are perfect straight lines and some of them cross intersect others at large angles.

The answer to that is the grooves were caused not by mining, but by the placing of Phobos in its orbit around Mars which, you might know, is virtually a perfect orbit and unusually close to the planet. The grooves were caused by loose boulders, etc.sliding around on the surface of the on the former asteroidal body and sometimes off of the body as it was maneuvered, turned and decelerated to its fine, little orbit around Mars.

That is the quick and dirty explanation. There was a far more detailed article on the Sightings website, but it didn't last long for some strange reason.

.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by Aliensun
So the mystery of the voids was never adequately solved and they don't want to talk about it.
It has been talked about because of new discoveries that show Phobos as a porous (or at least less dense) body, I didn't know that this was known since the Viking missions.


Or release the thousands of images taken of the little moon since the Vikings.
Thousands of photos taken by which missions?

PS: thanks for the explanation.
PPS: is this the page you were talking about?



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 05:25 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Sorry this is a little off topic.....(it's not in a sense)

I'm currently using a 8" reflector, which is great for all things lunar/solar system/nebula, but it's not the most portable of contraptions, especially when climbing the fells in the lake district (the mount itself weighs as much as a very small elephant).

So, I'm thinking of switching to one form of Cassegrain, when I do I plan on doing some photography with it. Can you save me some googling of reviews and what not and perhaps recommend a reasonably priced camera that can be easily mounted?



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


Unfortunately, I can't, I don't know a thing about that.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Hey, not a bad shot for a 3-Wood.



posted on Jan, 14 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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Great thread , the Black Knight fits kinda with what you are talking about i have always found this strange .




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