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How to feed yourself in the Appalachian mtns.

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posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 10:04 AM
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Always be aware of Poison Hemlock flowerinfo.org... Especially if you are harvesting Queen Annes Lace/Wild Carrot "Daucus carota." The look the same if you are using a field guide and are very hard to tell apart. Pass it by if you're not sure.

I live off the AT in the North.

edit on 16-11-2011 by moondancer811 because: typo




posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


You're not too far off in saying that. There was concern awhile back that governments would start to regulate wild plants and prohibit harvesting them. That was right around the time the USDA began spreading warnings about St Johns Wort, too many people were using the plant, took away money from the drug companies so they made a big deal out of the miniscule possibility of a side effect.



posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


While there may be very few lethal plants/vegetation out there, many of them are indirectly lethal in a survival situation - i.e. cause sickness which could dehydrate you (diarrhea) or make it impossible for you to much of anything besides be miserable.

The 'universal edibility test" takes a lot of time and effort not to mention contains many rules that are near impossible to remember unless you've prepped and studied...turning over a log is pretty quick and easy.

I'm no fan of eating grubs and beetles but I would do it to meet immediate needs rather than spending time & energy on foraging.



posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by RedParrotHead
reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


While there may be very few lethal plants/vegetation out there, many of them are indirectly lethal in a survival situation - i.e. cause sickness which could dehydrate you (diarrhea) or make it impossible for you to much of anything besides be miserable.

The 'universal edibility test" takes a lot of time and effort not to mention contains many rules that are near impossible to remember unless you've prepped and studied...turning over a log is pretty quick and easy.

I'm no fan of eating grubs and beetles but I would do it to meet immediate needs rather than spending time & energy on foraging.

I'm going to chime in here, hope you don't mind. You have some good points, some plants do cause other ailments if not used properly, or if the wrong part of the plant is used at the wrong time of the year and not prepared properly. Also, alot of edible plants have very strong medicinal properties.
This is why I stick with the basic 5 (there is actually 10) that are super easy to find, never toxic or overly medicinal yet nourishing and easy to harvest. We use them daily in my house, they are great plants to become friends with before you're wandering in the woods and you can never overdose on them. Ever.



posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by RedParrotHead
 


You can not live for any length of time by foraging for bugs. They can not be gathered in enough quantity to sustain you. Get out there and learn the local woods before it happens, and you are much better off than eating bugs.

edit on 16-11-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


Bug eating would be something I'd do in a temporary survival situation, not long term. Heading to the mountains isn't my bugout plan so I don't spend my time practicing there...my primary plan is to go the opposite direction (toward the coast) because I feel the hills will be crowded in a SHTF scenario. The closest mountains will be populated by every prepper, hunter and casual camper in Maryland, Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

However, I have gathered & bound hard copies of useful mountain survival techniques and equipment just in case.


The route to the shore has lots of farm land and with any luck the resort towns will be deserted either because of being off season or people evacuating to get home...lots of abandoned boats & housing, deer hunting and fishing etc.



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