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How to feed yourself in the Appalachian mtns.

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posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 

They have shown up here in Kentucky as well. It is " open season" on them, meaning year around. But hunting alone I think will not keep them under control.




posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 06:29 PM
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Star and a flag for this OP. Great read and awesome information. I don't live far from the Appalachian Trail and have hiked part of it before. One day I hope to hike the whole thing. This is great information for anyone wanting to hike most portions of it. I will keep this one bookmarked for later



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 07:12 PM
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soaking in salt water after the kill helps, but that's a bad idea (I think, anyway) for the meat you are not going to eat within a few hours. Pork spoils rapidly, can't really jerk it worth a hoot, it has to be frozen, or canned, or salted really heavily.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 07:26 PM
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Originally posted by requirement
soaking in salt water after the kill helps, but that's a bad idea (I think, anyway) for the meat you are not going to eat within a few hours. Pork spoils rapidly, can't really jerk it worth a hoot, it has to be frozen, or canned, or salted really heavily.


I've done the pig in a pit method...Samoan style, hole in the ground...all day cook. Tenderizes very well too.

A roast of wild game, my favorite way, is how my Grannie taught me. Take haunch of game meat, poke deep and many holes, stuff garlic cloves in holes. Then roll the whole thing in a thick covering of plain old mustard. Kind you put on your hot dogs. Sprinkle liberally with cracked pepper.

Then, roll the whole messy thing in rock salt...thick coat mind you. Take a brown paper grocery bag, grease outside of paper bag with lard, or crisco...whole bag folks. Place roast in paper bag, tie shut with larded/greased string...stick in oven of about 350 degrees....cook all day long or about 4-5 hrs depending on size. Take bag out of oven let sit for about 40 mins...tear open bag, take hammer and break open the geode the rock salt has made around the meat.

Voila...fork tender, wonderfully seasoned non-gamey roast. BON APPETIT
edit on 12-10-2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-10-2011 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 07:28 PM
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There are many plants you can eat in the Appalachia. There are truffles, usually buried under fallen leaves, fiddlehead ferns, and cattails. Also, wild ginger is everywhere. Most communities have at least one book that concerns local edible plants.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:11 PM
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reply to post by shadwgirl
 


Where I grew up, truffles were so hard to find. Something always ate them. I'm not sure what, but we had zero truffles anywhere.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:19 PM
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truffles are hard to find. I have a few spots where I live where I go truffling at. Most times I leave empty handed but they are definitely worth the work when I do find them. In a shtf situation, I don't think it would be worth it. I just mentioned them in case you got lucky and stumbled upon them. Puff mushrooms are an easy food to find in the woods and almost as good.. Rabbits and squirrels are everywhere and both are delicious. There is no reason to go hungry in the woods if you have a lick of sense.



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:27 PM
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the Ramps, or wild Leeks, can also be eaten later in the year. the root turns into a bulb, and contains a little more carbs. they're a little harder to find, as the leaves of gone, and all that's left is a single stalk with a cluster of seeds on top.

Another Fruit tree is the Paw-Paw...We find these in West Virginia...But they can be found in many Easter states.
Grows on smaller trees, and forms in groups of three fruits. Tastes like a cross between a banana and a mango.
en.wikipedia.org...

We also find Teaberries in the Winter. Also known as Wintergreen...Very tasty...
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:35 PM
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reply to post by spacedoubt
 


I've had pawpaws before, but the seeds are so big that they're not really worth the effort imo.
edit on 12-10-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 12 2011 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 


Yes, they are pretty seedy...But a mango...It has a pretty huge seed too.
If you're hungry, it's worth it There is good caloric value, with other nutrients., and ...Even if you aren't hungry, they are pretty tasty.
I like them a lot.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 07:07 AM
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reply to post by Evolutionsend
 

While the information you provided is great what you didn't tell people is that those items (morels, blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, etc) have a very SHORT harvest period. Each of those are only ripe/ready to pick for approximately three to four weeks, some a lot less, and then the season is over until the next year.



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 07:15 AM
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reply to post by SeenMyShare
 


Harvest time is in most of the sources that I cited.

reply to post by spacedoubt
 


I remember why we did not eat them now. Only the bigger ones are good for eating, when they're small, the seeds take up most of the fruit, and there's not much to eat. We never found any of the appropriate size.

edit on 13-10-2011 by Evolutionsend because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 07:54 AM
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no mention of preparing a 'bog', using most anything along with the rice... say doves, chickens, pork, bunny or most any other protein source



and when your fed & have time on your hands.... why not pan for gold up thar in the mountains?
see:
www.geology.enr.state.nc.us...


thanks



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by St Udio
 

the food sounds good! But in this part of Appalachian foot hills, (Kentucky) no gold. But we have coal!


It won't spend, but it will burn..
edit on 13-10-2011 by oldshooter1979 because: Left the "p" out



posted on Oct, 13 2011 @ 08:16 AM
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reply to post by oldshooter1979
 


I've never heard of gold in them thar hills either.



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


Damn that sounds AWESOME! Thanks for a great recipe idea!



posted on Oct, 18 2011 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 


The wild hog or as DEC puts it "feral swine" has reached up to the Yankee states as well. I live in NY but don't call myself a yankee as all my family roots go way back in Georgia, Tennessee and Alabama. I was born in Florida before it turned into souther Michigan and New Jersey, lol.

We have open season year round on them in NY and can't wait for one to cross my bow's path. Growing up in the glades and south Georgia, hog hunting was a major past time.

they are 300+ pound rats and we can be sure we will never see the end of them, especially with hunters becoming a dying past time in most areas.

Great string.



posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 08:41 AM
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reply to post by mantarey
 


Aren't they considered varmints?



posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 09:03 AM
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Unless you’re proficient in identifying edible plants, it’s not recommended that you forage for food.

“There’s too much stuff out there that could hurt you,” says Reggie Bennett, a former Air Force survival instructor and owner of the Mountain Shepherd Wilderness Survival School in Catawba, Virginia. “More importantly, you’re going to expend more calories looking for edible plants than you’ll get from those plants.”

Instead of plants, eat bugs.

“There’s more nutritional value in one ounce of termite than in one ounce of steak,” Bennett says.

Three Rules for Eating Bugs
[1] Only eat bugs with six legs or fewer (no spiders or centipedes).
[2] Eat the bugs that hide from you. Beetles, ants, termites, crickets, worms, and grubs in trees—they’re all safe to eat and they’ll give you plenty of caloric value.
[3] Deadfall is your friend. Turn over a downed log and you’re likely to find a host of bugs that are safe to eat. You might even find a snake, which Bennett says tastes like chicken.

Source - Survival Guide: 10 Essential Skills For The Blue Ridge Backcountry
edit on 11/16/2011 by RedParrotHead because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by RedParrotHead
 


"Beats dieing!"- My Dad

There are very few things out there that are lethal if following the rules regarding testing edibility. I'm sure he did say that, imagine the economic fallout if everyone in America knew that there was enough food in the woods behind their house to feed them indefinitely.



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