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Capitol DisPatch: New DNA Law Goes into Effect Oct. 1

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posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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Capitol DisPatch: New DNA Law Goes into Effect Oct. 1


farmington.patch.com

Effective Oct. 1, those arrested for any of 39 serious felonies must provide a DNA sample before they are released from custody if they have a prior felony conviction and have never before provided a DNA sample. While opponents contend the law tramples on civil liberties, supporters say it could solve cold cases, prevent future crimes and even exonerate the innocent.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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I think this is great for cold cases and for any and all sex offenders, but I am curious to find the 39 serious felonies that are attributed to this. I don't see them mentioned in the article. If anyone finds them, please post.

I guess another positive to this is that it can help free any wrongly convicted people in the future as well.

farmington.patch.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 10:02 AM
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As this just affects Connecticut, it will be interesting to see if other states follow suit.

I'm sure this is something that will be of great help to the Innocence Project, stopping the wrong person from being blamed in all too many cases.
www.innocenceproject.org...



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 10:16 AM
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It does not just affect Connecticut. New Mexico has basically the same law:


Connecticut’s new law resembles “Katie’s Law,” so named for Katie Sepich. The 22-year-old was raped, strangled to death, burned and left in a dumpsite near her New Mexico home in 2003. She fought her killer and had blood under her nails.


I am all for this law, and not just because I used to work with Katie Sepich's uncle.

A couple weeks ago the law enabled a rapist to be caught because he had to submit a DNA sample for a prior felony. He raped someone and popped up in the database when they tested the DNA he left.

These are criminals, people. It's not like they are making everyone submit DNA.


Edit to add: I support the innocence project also. Too many times the cops can't 'get their man' so they end up framing some black dude to make themselves look better. When someone is proven innocent, I think they should go after the cops who set him up.


edit on 26-9-2011 by AwakeinNM because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 10:26 AM
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reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 


Thanks for letting us know this is not a federal law.

Wow, keep on infringing on the people.

Damned eye in the sky!

I would like to know what these 39 felonies are as well.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by ThinkingCap
reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 


Thanks for letting us know this is not a federal law.

Wow, keep on infringing on the people.

Damned eye in the sky!

I would like to know what these 39 felonies are as well.


Agreed, the Feds need to stay out of people's lives. State residents have much more sway over their legislatures than they do Congress, so if they don't like what is going on, they can recall their reps.

I would guess that the felonies are violent crimes where DNA could be collected. There are a lot of sex crimes in many categories. 39 sounds like a high number, but they split crimes into so many categories that they probably just add up. As a state law, it's likely not as intrusive as a federal law would be.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by AwakeinNM
 

Not just blacks, anyone handy that can be used as the fall guy.

A guy we knew spent years in prison for a rape he did not do. He was framed by the cops....just a convenient way to close the case.
It changed the man in a way only prison could.
They not only took away years of his life, they basically took his being....he sued, but money cannot replace what happened to him.

States need this tool, and hopefully it will not lead to abuse.



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by cluckerspud
 


As proposed, "those with a (prior) felony conviction"...I am all for it.

If it were just for felony (potential) arrests, then I'm afraid I'd have to side with the ALCU, etc. on this one....



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 12:46 PM
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This is how they break it down in California.

List of Serious felonies (Three Strikes)

Hope this helps...



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by BurningSpearess
 


here's a link to DNA law in various states, as well as federal statutes
DNA Collection upon Arrest

Not all felonies are created equally: some states it's all felonies, some violent felonies, some specific types:
DNA collections are norm in 24 states
edit on Mon Sep 26 2011 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 07:55 PM
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reply to post by DontTreadOnMe
 


Great info. and sources you have provided.

I had *no idea* so many states can just demand DNA without probable cause upon request at arrest without conviction..

Not that I would know, but it just seems like fingerprints would be enough unless you have prior convictions.

I can see some benefits to the judicial system in some cases, but it seems to trump privacy and a presumption of innocence in others--



posted on Sep, 26 2011 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
reply to post by AwakeinNM
 

Not just blacks, anyone handy that can be used as the fall guy.

A guy we knew spent years in prison for a rape he did not do. He was framed by the cops....just a convenient way to close the case.
It changed the man in a way only prison could.
They not only took away years of his life, they basically took his being....he sued, but money cannot replace what happened to him.

States need this tool, and hopefully it will not lead to abuse.


True, but it seems like whenever I see a story on one of the news magazines about someone who was exonerated by DNA testing, it's a black guy.







 
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