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Interesting - but problematic statistics: Autism and Atheism

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posted on Sep, 19 2011 @ 10:28 PM
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Originally posted by Annee

Originally posted by Mountainmeg
Atheism is also a faith-based decision that there is nothing - and you can't prove a negative.


No its not.

That is a very ignorant conception of Atheism.
Please spell out why you are right. I want to know why you don't think there is a single leap of faith in that conclusion.

While the predominant argument is generally held by most Atheist that they are not in a religion, many will openly admit that since there's no way to be 100% certain, they will admit with no shame that they take it on faith that there is no God. They think, though, that the evidence that they've accumulated indicates that their faith has some factual weight--to the point where they think that a Godless universe is the most reasonable decision.




posted on Sep, 19 2011 @ 11:22 PM
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Originally posted by CynicalDrivel

I want to know why you don't think there is a single leap of faith in that conclusion.

While the predominant argument is generally held by most Atheist that they are not in a religion, many will openly admit that since there's no way to be 100% certain, they will admit with no shame that they take it on faith that there is no God. They think, though, that the evidence that they've accumulated indicates that their faith has some factual weight--to the point where they think that a Godless universe is the most reasonable decision.
i

Faith: Definition of FAITH
1a : allegiance to duty or a person : loyalty b (1) : fidelity to one's promises (2) : sincerity of intentions
2a (1) : belief and trust in and loyalty to God (2) : belief in the traditional doctrines of a religion b (1) : firm belief in something for which there is no proof (2) : complete trust
3: something that is believed especially with strong conviction; especially : a system of religious beliefs

Everyone is Agnostic. Which means "I don't know". Even believers are Agnostic - - but few will admit to it.

Atheism is not a rejection of belief - - - because to reject - - you must first believe.

Atheism is a non belief. A lack of belief. There is nothing of real fact that supports a deity in the position of man made religion.

Atheism has one meaning: Lack of belief in a deity. That's it. That is the only definition of Atheism.

There are spiritual Atheists. The only criteria is lack of belief in a deity.

There are also hard core Atheists - - - that expect proof.

It is individual.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 12:18 AM
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Wow, this is a really important topic. I personally have struggled with this issue with my son, who has Aspergers, and is a high functioning, although quite problematic, teen. I find that God is hard for him to grasp, even though he knows he should and would like to. He lives a life of his own making, and does not seem to ascribe to the world of our neurotypical society's expectations much. Although peer pressures are another story, mostly for the sake of being accepted, him feeling so outside of the norm at times.

I also noticed this same spiritual (or lack thereof) trend on a Facebook group I belong to regarding Aspergers, which includes many Aspies who contribute comments to the various daily topics. There appeared to be the same atheistic type of trend with many of them. It did get me thinking about what a struggle it must be to try to raise a child in a Christian family that just cannot really grasp or relate to someone he can neither see, touch, or hear, when that is all he really "gets" in life. My son is much more attached and sentimental toward things rather than people. When I talk about God or my faith in God, or try to pray with him, it really freaks him out sometimes, it's just too strange to him. I think it's not just that, but anything that might exist outside his limited/personal scope of reality is a bit scary to him and quite baffling. He'd rather not think about those things, and just stick with his most basic wants and desires, almost on a childlike, animalistic level, I wonder how that fits in with Maslow's heirarchy of needs? Considering his basic desires never seem satisfied, and he is always craving but never complete in that area in his yearnings, maybe he does not have the ability right now to ascend to that higher level of need on the scale, the spiritual fulfillment level, as such. He is either content, or limited, to stay on the current plane, that seems to be all his mind allows right now.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 12:22 AM
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Originally posted by saintinwaiting
I find that God is hard for him to grasp, even though he knows he should and would like to.


He knows he should. Really?

And who decided that?
edit on 20-9-2011 by Annee because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 12:24 AM
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Originally posted by saintinwaiting
Wow, this is a really important topic. I personally have struggled with this issue with my son, who has Aspergers, and is a high functioning, although quite problematic, teen. I find that God is hard for him to grasp, even though he knows he should and would like to. He lives a life of his own making, and does not seem to ascribe to the world of our neurotypical society's expectations much. Although peer pressures are another story, mostly for the sake of being accepted, him feeling so outside of the norm at times.

I also noticed this same spiritual (or lack thereof) trend on a Facebook group I belong to regarding Aspergers, which includes many Aspies who contribute comments to the various daily topics. There appeared to be the same atheistic type of trend with many of them. It did get me thinking about what a struggle it must be to try to raise a child in a Christian family that just cannot really grasp or relate to someone he can neither see, touch, or hear, when that is all he really "gets" in life. My son is much more attached and sentimental toward things rather than people. When I talk about God or my faith in God, or try to pray with him, it really freaks him out sometimes, it's just too strange to him. I think it's not just that, but anything that might exist outside his limited/personal scope of reality is a bit scary to him and quite baffling. He'd rather not think about those things, and just stick with his most basic wants and desires, almost on a childlike, animalistic level, I wonder how that fits in with Maslow's heirarchy of needs? Considering his basic desires never seem satisfied, and he is always craving but never complete in that area in his yearnings, maybe he does not have the ability right now to ascend to that higher level of need on the scale, the spiritual fulfillment level, as such. He is either content, or limited, to stay on the current plane, that seems to be all his mind allows right now.


Oh, and please don't get me wrong, I know it is each person's right and freedom to choose what they believe in, really. Of course, some do it to please their family, but in my faith, that is not the right reason. It should be done from your own heart and understanding, not under pressure or out of obligation. I hope it did not sound that way. I am just glad to see it discussed because it was something I have observed and came to understand more over the past year, but never really gotten around to sharing with anyone to work out the concept.

I think the whole point of the original post is the difficulties that may be present in persons with high functioning autism in the area of comprehending the concept of God, if I'm not mistaken.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 12:32 AM
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Originally posted by saintinwaiting
. . . maybe he does not have the ability right now to ascend to that higher level of need on the scale, the spiritual fulfillment level, as such. He is either content, or limited, to stay on the current plane, that seems to be all his mind allows right now.


I find this incredibly disturbing.

Let him be who he is. And can the god stuff.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 12:47 AM
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I don't know why anyone would try to force Christianity on those of the Autism spectrum.

Followers of Christianity are so hypocritical.

Anyone in the Autism spectrum needs complete honesty. That for sure - - is not Christianity.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 12:52 AM
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Originally posted by Annee
something that is believed especially with strong conviction; especially : a system of religious beliefs
Can you believe with a strong conviction that there is no God? If so, the definition fits. This is what most people mean when they use the word faith and they own it.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 12:55 AM
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If you are born somewhere islam is the most active religious meme then there’s a good chance you will be a Muslim, the same for anyone born in a Christian area or Hindu or Buddhist and so on – therefore the “god” you personally think is the real one depends on which “god” your mum and dad think is the real one or the god concept you get depends on your address - nothing more

I was born into a situation where nobody does religion; I don’t have a god concept

For me anybody talking about Jesus & Satan (for example) might as well be talking about He-Man & Skeletor – it’s that simple


edit on 20-9-2011 by racasan because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 01:02 AM
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Originally posted by AnneeThat for sure - - is not Christianity.
Far more accurate to say "that for sure is not Christians." and modify it with "most".



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 02:08 AM
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i dont know much about the physical effects of autism in the brain but i remember watching that documentary about the "god helmet" which induces a feeling of a higher power being present or some sort of spirituality. perhaps the part of the brain which the god helmet is stimulating is not functioning properly in an autistic person so they just dont 'feel' the whole god thing.

at any rate, good for them! trying to make them understand a ridiculous thing like god or religion is just cruel.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 02:26 AM
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I have been racking my brain

What’s the clinical name for someone who thinks everybody else believes exactly as he/she (the patient) does, but that everybody else is hiding it - or is somehow fooling themselves that they don’t?

Any help appreciated



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 02:41 AM
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Who is most likely to have mental issues. The anti-crutch Atheist or a believer in religion/christianity.

In my opinion the answer to this is obvious if consideration is made within the realms of reality!!!

In my experience those inflicted with Autism rarely accept or contemplate blindly!

The fact that there are far more atheists in those countires were people are better and more educated and also tend to have the naturally smarter folk suggests that blind faith believers are just that "Blind of Mind"!



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 06:45 AM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


There could be a correlation between high-functioning autism and atheism because those with high-functioning autism are more intelligent than average, and there is a known link between intelligence and atheism.

A very interesting find though, at the very least it rules out that those with autism are more likely to be religious. And thanks for giving me a cool topic to reply to so I could test my new avatar.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 06:46 AM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


... and the avatar fails again.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 03:51 PM
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Originally posted by Annee

Originally posted by Mountainmeg
Atheism is also a faith-based decision that there is nothing - and you can't prove a negative.


No its not.

That is a very ignorant conception of Atheism.


Even lacking social skills I think "ignorant" is not nice.
I'd say more simplistic and uninformed if it's wrong. My understanding is based on the few atheists (probably 10 or less) that I have personally known during my life so may be limited. For example, question my dad on why he believes there is no God and his answer is "there is no proof there is one" and that's the sum and summation of it. I know far more folks, including myself, who are self-described agnostics because, well, we just don't know.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by Annee
I don't know why anyone would try to force Christianity on those of the Autism spectrum.

Followers of Christianity are so hypocritical.

Anyone in the Autism spectrum needs complete honesty. That for sure - - is not Christianity.


Probably for the same reason those who are die-hard atheists and those of other religion try to force all mention of Christianity out of schools, courtrooms, concerts and the like. I mean, there are atheists protesting the display of the surviving I-beams from the World Trade Center because they are in the shape of a cross and therefore "Christian" in nature.


I feel that Christianity is part of the history integral to the United States. I don't want to be forced to be christian, but trying to purge every mention of it from the land is just as short sighted because it hinders an understanding of our history.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by Mountainmeg
Probably for the same reason those who are die-hard atheists and those of other religion try to force all mention of Christianity out of schools, courtrooms, concerts and the like.


Atheists do not try to force Christianity out of all schools - etc.

They - rightly - stand that religion does not belong in government. Such as public/government schools - - government courtrooms - etc.

Concerts? Which concerts are you referring too? Perhaps the Christian Sponsored Army one in Virginia?

Yeah - - that would be government. So wrong.
edit on 20-9-2011 by Annee because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 05:59 PM
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Originally posted by Mountainmeg

Originally posted by Annee

Originally posted by Mountainmeg
Atheism is also a faith-based decision that there is nothing - and you can't prove a negative.


No its not.

That is a very ignorant conception of Atheism.


Even lacking social skills I think "ignorant" is not nice.


Ignorant means simply - - lack of knowledge.

It is not nice or un-nice - - - it just is.



posted on Sep, 20 2011 @ 07:06 PM
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Originally posted by racasan
I have been racking my brain

What’s the clinical name for someone who thinks everybody else believes exactly as he/she (the patient) does, but that everybody else is hiding it - or is somehow fooling themselves that they don’t?

Any help appreciated




Narcissism?



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