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Compoud Bow vs Recurve bow

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posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 08:55 PM
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Which would be better for survival/ self defense. I would use it to either hunt or defend my family and i was wondering which one would be a better option.




posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:01 PM
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Recurve bow if you know how to shoot one. Compound if you're not that great or just beginning. Another reason to grab the recurve bow is that it has less parts. But, if you're not very strong, compound may be the best way to go. Depends on your specific situation I guess.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by susej
 

Ask yourself which you would rather have facing you. An arrow in your throat from ten metres does not discriminate what bow it comes from. I am a recurve man myself but, power and accuracy is the ultimate trade off.

Keep it simple I say, less to go wrong / repair in the field.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:05 PM
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For survival, I recommend the sling bow. It is very compact and surprisingly accurate. It is much cheaper then your other two choices and faster to master.
For self defense, assuming you are bugging in, I would choose the crossbow first, the recurve second and the compound third. Well, I would take any of my guns first, but I am assuming you do not have access to firearms for whatever reason.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:08 PM
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You can't shoot wood arrows with a compound bow if longevity makes a difference to you.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:09 PM
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I'm not well educated in Archery, but I think that's probably gonna be an individual decision. What you have to know is the depth the arrow will sink into the game. For deers and such, most people prefer compound bows, but for smaller game they may be too strong. You want the arrow to penetrate and the point to stay inside the animal. This way when the animal moves around, it's muscles cause the tip to move around inside and cause more damage. For survival, you're probably gonna be shooting at smaller game, because chances are you're not gonna see deer or hogs every day.
Personally, I've always preferred shooting with a re-curve, but then again, I only weigh 135 pounds. Most larger men probably prefer compounds.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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Fire Arms Arnt really a option because I'm 16. Im still not sure which one to get yet :/ but thanks everyone for the answers.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 09:50 PM
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I have owned both. A compound is very heavy whereas a re-curve is lighter.
A compound will shoot through a standard door.
It has more parts to replace.
Realistically for survival find the wood types best suited for a bow and keep a small kit of strings and feathers & arrow heads in your survival bag.
Carrying around a fancy compound bow in a post apocalyptic wasteland is going to make you the envy of those without.
Remember bow = quite and hopefully 1-2 shots. If you get the right wood you can make a staff which converts to a re-curve when required.

Tip:Watch those elbows when you first start practicing.

edit on 15-9-2011 by Shirak because: ad sum more



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:17 PM
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Yea I was wondering if I could craft arrows for a Compound bow. I was also considering a air gun but I don't think one under $300 would kill someone or larger game.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by susej
 


the recurve is a heck of a lot easier to restring than a compound bow



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:24 PM
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I'm a Recurve man as well, I have an old 1953 Bear Recurve, 45# draw, fibreglass and portable. I can put ANY string on it, even my boot strings. Its obviously not more powerful than a compound, but try to string up a compound yourself and you'll hate life. lol..

Edit to add: I bought this bow from a neighbor for $20 by the way. Recurves are much less expensive and easier to maintain in the extreme long term. There is always some new compound released in the latest ''bass pro'' catalog, that it would be obsolete the moment you walked out their door with it. Like a computer from 2001.. lol

edit on 15-9-2011 by Tanulis because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:32 PM
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I only have a compound bow but would prefer a recurve during survival just as many others have suggested. You can make your own arrows is a big plus. A compound will shoot further with more power behind it but usually you hunt up close with a bow and wouldn't want to take a real wild long distant shot with it anyways. Bye Bye arrow.

Remember, in a survival situation one can make a garden hoe a deadly weapon.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by Tanulis
 

That's a trip! I also have a 1953 Bear Recurve. It's a TigerCat, but only 23lb pull, made in Canada. I haven't shot it in years, and of course it's not very powerful, but it shoots well and is absolutely beautiful...



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 10:59 PM
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Have you ever seen anyone straighten wooden arrows through a method I believe is called "sympathy"? One of my friends is a world-class archer; he shoots a long-bow. He moved down to the Florida Keys several years ago because he works as a marine carpenter, building and remodeling boats. Once while I was visiting him, there was a show on television he was watching where they took a straight wooden arrow and rubbed it lengthwise down the shaft of a warped one. After several minutes (I think), the warped arrow straightened. I thought it was BS, but the guy told me he's seen it done before. I'm not sure how many times you have to rub them in that fashion, and I've never tried it myself; I just thought you might find it interesting. It could save arrows in a survival situation as well...



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 11:16 PM
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A compound bow uses a simple pulley system which lets you fire an arrow with more foot pounds of force than would be possible with a recurve bow.

But it also needs a good deal of maintenance. A lot can go wrong with a compound bow.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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You perhaps should of included the Crossbow as an option .



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 11:41 PM
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The compounds let off is its major bonus of course, as you can hold it for longer with less strain, however, the recurve as others have mentioned is less expensive, easier to string, makeable, can fire any arrow, you can make arrows, and a lot less noticeable than a compound, with as has also been mentioned the possibility of make a staff that can serve as one, though that will have a hell of a draw, i personally like the compound, but in a survival situation, as others have suggested i would choose the recurve every time.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 11:42 PM
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silent and deadly.
but you must practice ever day if you can.
you get a strong arm.
the bow should stand as tall as you.
in old England all men had to have and train with a bow.
they where a home guard. if the French or any one attacks England.
sticking up two fingers is an insult to the French.
because English bowmen would wipe them out in battle.
if the got you alive, the Cut off the two bow fingers.
English bow men could shoot a long way and hit you.



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 11:43 PM
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I have a 65 lbs. Black Bear II bought back in the 80's. I have only changed the string 3 or 4 times and never once snapped it. I use 18 strand string and wax it every so many months. You can't go wrong with a compound that's well built, but as someone said... Arrows can be lost due to it's power and wood arrows will not work very well.

I just looked at a Academy's recurve bow, it seemed cheap and toyish... but for 40 dollars a 25 lbs bow seems tempting.... Anyone tried that one? www.academy.com...

edit on 16-9-2011 by imitator because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2011 @ 11:51 PM
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I have used both on an off for some time now have to say compound is great I use a 70 lb draw weight ! Has great accuracy and stopping power but you need too use a release aid too draw it can't use fingers it tears the skin off ! For survival I would much prefer a simple long bow or recurve something that can be easily repaired in the field .better still a sling shot,simple wooden fork stick some leather and some rubber of some kind .I have used one for most of my life and have hunted rabbits and birds and even ducks with the with good success. Great thread by the way !



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