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Opportunity to see a supernova September 3-10, 2011

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posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 11:36 PM
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DAMN CHEMTRAILS!




posted on Sep, 3 2011 @ 11:54 PM
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reply to post by Arrrr
 


The neutrinos only give you about an hour's warning. Not a long time. And only for certain supernova types.

en.wikipedia.org...

As for other supernovas, the light received is the first indication.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 01:20 AM
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reply to post by mblahnikluver
 


Satellites ALWAYS are moving though. They are never stationary. They are in a fixed moving path orbiting Earth. You live in ignorance if you think a stationary object was a satellite.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 09:06 AM
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Well I don't know why it didn't mention that this could have been viewable at the end of August.
The linked piece just states the 3rd through the 10th would have loved to had a chance to observe it from the begining
to see the difference.
It just amazes me that this happed 21,000,000 years ago and we are now just seeing the effects.

Last night I went out to view, but sadly it was clouding over more like a haze normally theres a gazillion stars couldn't find the dipper I did manage to see something crazy
though while looking to the sky around 9:00 pm eastern I saw what seemed to be a bright star close to another star I focused on it ..it was moving quite fast it seemed about as large as a normal star as high in the sky as a star, as I
watched it just vanished as if it tuned off It was very interesting. I love watching the sky it fasinates me.
I gaze up at night and have spotted many satellites moving across the black sky so they do move.
I would be interested if anyone did get to see the supernova ....would love to know as I will keep trying for the next week.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 09:20 AM
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I took my 8" dobsonian out last night to view it. Very hard to find but I finally found what I thought was it.

It looked like a star, except it was more of a red/orange color rather than white/blue.

I couldn't see the fuzzy pinwheel galaxy though which makes me think maybe I wasn't looking at the right spot. But, if I was looking at it, it looked like a bright red-orange star.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by Chance321
 


I also live in CNY and was very worried I wouldn't be able to see it, but I went out almost immediately after sunset, found the big dipper and started searching. The clouds covered the moon and most of the horizon, but the dipper was pretty much overhead at that time of night.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 03:58 PM
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The ancient Hopi Indian prophecy comes to mind,"When the blue star Kachina makes its appearence in the heavens the fifth world will emerge." Maybe they really meant an actual star and not something blue in the sky that looks like one. Does anyone know how bright it will actually get?



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 04:34 PM
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Is there any danger in looking at a supernova? I imagine some of them would have to give off high frequency EM radiation which could penetrate Earth's atmosphere?



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by starlitestarbrite
 


I spent probably 30 minutes trying to follow that star guide, but with my mirror-image telescope it got pretty tricky. I eventually got the hang of it, but when I would come to the last star where you have to go up, I could get to the almost halfway point with the two stars that make a line similar to the two stars at the starting point which are a part of the handle, but from there I would go up and just see some stars.......

I had a good look at those, and called it a night since the article said it would just look like a regular old star as a point of light. Hopefully Betelgeuse will go supernova in my lifetime, I want to see a supernova in full detail.



posted on Sep, 4 2011 @ 10:57 PM
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reply to post by ADMX101
 



Does anyone know how bright it will actually get?
Not very bright, but just visible. From the article:

The supernova will look just like a star, like a pinpoint of light.



posted on Sep, 13 2011 @ 04:53 PM
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*Bump*

Still visible... just above the last 2 stars in the Big Dipper's handle.

You'll need binoculars to see it well enough...



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