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Long lines, empty shelves plague east coast stores ahead of Irene *pics*

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posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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I heard a lot on the news about how east coast stores are practically empty and hopelessly crowded. So, I decided to check out my local grocery store to see for myself. Keep in mind this is central Maryland, where we're expected to just get mostly rain...

When I walked in, this was one of the first things I noticed, the incredibly long lines:


First I checked the paper towel/toilet paper aisle. It's usually full:

practically empty. Can't live without that toilet paper lol


Next, I checked the fruit aisle:

no strawberries or blueberries. Well, there was 1 remaining package of strawberries


Here's a pic of the produce aisle:

Didn't get a pic of the rest of the produce, but for the most part, they were picked over and scarce...

Milk:


Pretty low, but not so much. If we lose power, the milk will sour. Hey, that rhymes!

Ice:

Totally out

Bread aisle:


Almost bare. Considering that it's usually packed pretty tightly, that's a lot of bread people bought.

Soda aisle:


Water aisle. Practically empty!




Conclusion: Whether hype or not, people are taking this storm seriously. Shelves are practically bare as people flock to the store and buy essential goods.
edit on 27-8-2011 by mossme89 because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:49 AM
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You pay $1 for 2ltr of Pepsi??? DAMN....its £1.99 here or $3.28!!!



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


lol, we don't really buy soda very often.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:52 AM
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Looks like a lot of people will be stockpiled after the storm is gone.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 10:56 AM
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It's reactios like this to a little rain that prevents people from trusting the public with foreknowledge of potential emergencies. In new jersey and not worried; but I don't live on the beach, I don't know Atlantic city power/ whatever they're called but PSE&G, my provider has rarely if ever had blackouts that more than a couple hours whether it be hurricane, blizzard, ice storm or even the dreaded nor'easter.

I also don't save shopping to the last minute.

edit on 8/27/2011 by eNumbra because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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Interesting to see what people are stocking up on.

water
whole milk
fruits and vegetables
bread
ice
toilet paper

Looks like people were big on fruits. Out of the vegetables, carrots, lettuce and celery were left behind.

Are the pics the things that were sold out the most or was it pretty much the same all over? For instance, were canned and dry goods ( beans, rice, sugar, flour, etc) being sold out?

I'm also curious if people were buying up propane, charcoal and meats.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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Originally posted by mossme89
reply to post by loves a conspiricy
 


lol, we don't really buy soda very often.


For a dollar I'm surprised you don't.

Most places are double or triple that.




posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:28 AM
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reply to post by eNumbra
 


Panic buying at its' finest. Those folks are gonna pretty mad they blew all that money on a scare tactic. But to quote the old addage, "prepare for the worst and hope for the best" may apply here. I wonder if Georgia Pacific tripled their prices on plywood again...



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by eNumbra
 


Yeah, because I'm sure your company has had a lot of experience dealing with hurricanes in NJ and all.





As for the OP, pretty interesting pics. I've seen it worse in my area for the blizzards for fear that people will get "snowed in" (which never happens), but it looks like it is pretty bad. It is better to be safe than sorry I suppose. I am at least glad to see that people were buying water over soda.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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It is for this reason alone that I will be stockpiling myself with 24 hour military ration packs, and I advise others to do the same. The weather is becoming more unpredictable around the globe, and as the markets crash food will be in short supply.

UK Issue packs come in a cardboard box, and can sit for at least 5 years without going out of date. They provide a high calorie count, come in "boil in the bag" pouches so they do not come into contact with potentially contaminated water when cooked, but if no water is around they can also be consumed cold. Most are issued with water purification tablets, and sometimes hexamine blocks for cooking fuel. As well as this, they come with various sundries such as tea and coffee, non dairy creamers, chocolate, boiled sweets, tinned spreads, tissue and windproof matches. They can be bought online or through your local army surplus stores (you may have to ask in advance at the store).



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by gwydionblack
reply to post by eNumbra
 


Yeah, because I'm sure your company has had a lot of experience dealing with hurricanes in NJ and all.

Did you stop reading shortly before I mentioned blizzards, ice storms, nor'easters and hurricanes?
We get hurricane remnants and tropicals storms in NJ every year as well as everything else I mentioned.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by eNumbra
 


Last I looked, "hurricane remnants" weren't full blown hurricanes. And no, I read your entire post. But, just for your lack of sincerity towards others in this time, it would be funny to see how happy you were for your choice in electricity companies when your home is underwater.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by mossme89
 


They all had a week to prepare and 90% of them choose to prepare minutes before the storm arrives. Nice.

I got some things I thought I might need a couple days ago. I thought I was a little late to the action actually, since the storm had been talked about for like a week before. Turns out, the stores were empty... of people, and filled with goods.

Im much more prudent than most in my area, Im guessing most of us on this site are.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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Originally posted by gwydionblack
reply to post by eNumbra
 


Last I looked, "hurricane remnants" weren't full blown hurricanes. And no, I read your entire post. But, just for your lack of sincerity towards others in this time, it would be funny to see how happy you were for your choice in electricity companies when your home is underwater.


Sincerity for panic?

Rest assured my home won't be underwater, so I guess it sucks to be everyone else. If I'm being insincere by not condoning the irrational fear that is gripping much of the northeast(and mind you I understand the concerns of the actual coast) then I guess I'm being I sincere, but western and northern new jersey will be fine.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by eNumbra
 


What is so "irrational" about fearing mother nature? Do you believe that we as humans are able to predict and control what mother nature does to us? Because I certainly don't and neither do most people.

What is so "irrational" about making sure you have sustenance in case something happens that the stores are inaccessible?

What is so "irrational" about boarding up windows so flying debris doesn't fly into your home?

What is so "irrational" about mandatory evacuation orders to low lying areas, with punishment given if you don't comply?


The only people being "irrational" in this situation are (maybe) the governments with their mass evacuations, and (most definitely) you, and anyone else who thinks that they are invincible to the catastrophes of the Earth. 'Irrational' is knowing the possibility of bad things happening, yet doing absolutely nothing to prepare or prevent it, while at the same time - trying to make a fool out of people who actually have some sense to do so.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:02 PM
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Went to a small store here locally in NC, and the shelves of bread were packed full. I bought a loaf, and commented to the clerk that I was shocked that she wasn't stripped clean of bread.

She smiled and said "the bread guy JUST left, have no fear all of that will be gone my the time we close".



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:12 PM
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OP Update: Just got back from the store. It's only a quarter mile away so we usually walk for quick errands, but with the rain, we drove to pick up a few snacks. IT'S CRAZY! People are panicking. When walking in, we saw this guy yelling at another guy for taking his parking space. When leaving, I was almost hit... TWICE! The first time, the guy didn't have his turn signal on and made a left turn, cutting me off from my left turn (I had my turn signal on). The second time, a lady almost backed into me as I was going down the aisle of cars.

I have to say, for the first time ever, I agree with the government for not disclosing certain things that can cause panic. People are stupid and fearful and if even a small storm like this brings out the worst in people, what about something bigger? Stupid sheeple...



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by N3k9Ni
 


Surprisingly, there were still a ton of canned goods. Obviously less than usual, but the shelves were very much still stocked. There were less meats than usual, but still some. If the power goes out, meat spoils so.... I didn't check the other goods to see if they were in stock. I'll stop up there on a run later and check.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by gwydionblack
 


Your rampant need to jump on me is certainly irrational, the fact that you are outlining specifics that I have made no mention of is quite irrational. Nothing wrong with making sure you have an extra day or twos worth of food, but people are panic buying a weeks worth of groceries, and acting like 1 they had no idea this was coming when bad storms are not irregular and 2 it's going to be Katrina 2.0.

Boarding up shore properties and evacuating jerseys barrier islands makes sense, though punishing people for not doing so is insane and just another example of the nanny-state. To insinuate that I am irrational for not being afraid? Really?

I guess we'll see who was right by Monday.



posted on Aug, 27 2011 @ 04:52 PM
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im somewhat surprised quick-perishing foods were selling out.

im not suprised people have grown so dependent on bottled water. i've never bought bottled water in my life. i recycle glass snapple containers and keep snapple water refrigerated.

i add a few drops of food grade H202 instead of the suggested bleach, because peroxide is more natural a water preservative.

i guess those people want comfort foods as they ride out the storm. give me milk powder, protein powder, and some water to drink (as well as wash my bum) and im good to go.




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