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Survival /Self Defense: stopping the FIGHT or FLIGHT response

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posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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I found this. It doesn't really go into a whole lot of detail, but everyone needs reminding from time to time



This is the third part to my situational awareness series for now. I've already covered how to practice and make yourself hyperaware in your day to day routine. I've covered some basic steps in recognizing and understanding body language. Now we're to the point that an altercation is imminent. There are a few things you need to know about your body. Don't worry. This isn't going to be a discussion about the birds and the bees. That would just be..... Awkward.

When we get into stressful situations where we feel our well being is in danger, a response triggers that's commonly known as "Fight or Flight." Our adrenal glands flood our bodies with adrenaline and cortisol, our pupils dilate, and secondary functions are put on hold diverting energy to our core functions to precipitate the maximum performance our bodies will allow. As such, we lose our peripheral vision and ability to critically think. Both can spell disaster if you don't learn and practice keeping it in check. If you freeze, you're done for.

So how do you learn how to cope with this short of going out and picking fights?


Rest at link: mountainwoodsman.com...




posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:48 AM
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basically take self defence and give your self a boost in confidence so your body doesn't react as intense as it would without that confidence


thanks op



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:52 AM
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I find comfort in the feel of a 1911A in my hand.
Anyone wants conflict with me better come loaded for bear.
I read the whole post last night and thought it was pretty good.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 11:55 AM
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When I was pregnant, I did calmbirth classes which were designed to help eliminate fear and to trust in my natural ability to birth my baby. Once I eliminated fear, I also eliminated the fight or flight response.
It helped me tremendously.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:10 PM
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Confidence and state of mind is important. Being aware of the affect that fear does have on the body is also critical as it allows you to focus on what to expect and practice at how to counter it. Aiming for a state of serenity and calmness is a show of confidence. When the SHTF having that adrenalin can help but is not going to stick around for long, so do what ever you are going to do and make it quick. Having previous training helps as you will not be very cognitive and just reacting to the situation.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by seedofchucky
basically take self defence and give your self a boost in confidence so your body doesn't react as intense as it would without that confidence


thanks op


Self Defense just helps a bit with the confidence. Confidence is the main key. I've seen better fighters put down by guys that raged them up and just didn't care if they got their butts kicked or not. It's 90% mental and 10% physical.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by PayMeh
 


Once your body releases that huge surge of adrenaline, you can't just put it back. It's there.
If you intellectually determine it isn't needed, that you've made a mistake, or the circumstances suddenly change, it's all mind control from there. You will have to "talk yourself down".

Plus, after you've calmed down, you'll find you are very exhausted. Try to find a constructive use for it, until it diminishes.

*I'm on a survival thread*



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by Asktheanimals
I find comfort in the feel of a 1911A in my hand.
Anyone wants conflict with me better come loaded for bear.
I read the whole post last night and thought it was pretty good.


I agree and have my CWP as well. It's a very nice confidence builder for sure! There's an interesting discussion there about knife vs gun though. I'll paraphrase here. The average time it takes to unholster is around 3 seconds and someone who has a knife out can cover 21 feet before you get the draw. For that reason, plus your focus is on your weapon instead of the one that your attacker has, and fear of sustaining a cut bad enough to lose grip on the weapon during the struggle, he recommends not drawing and treating it like you would if you were unarmed. There is a high emphasis on running away though. Which I understand. The thought of a knife fight makes me queasy.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by ellbell
When I was pregnant, I did calmbirth classes which were designed to help eliminate fear and to trust in my natural ability to birth my baby. Once I eliminated fear, I also eliminated the fight or flight response.
It helped me tremendously.


Nice! I think that's the whole gist of the article and why it's so short. There's not much in step by step instruction you can give for this beyond build your confidence and eliminate fear.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by kwakakev
Confidence and state of mind is important. Being aware of the affect that fear does have on the body is also critical as it allows you to focus on what to expect and practice at how to counter it. Aiming for a state of serenity and calmness is a show of confidence. When the SHTF having that adrenalin can help but is not going to stick around for long, so do what ever you are going to do and make it quick. Having previous training helps as you will not be very cognitive and just reacting to the situation.


Bingo. That sums it up quite nicely. The drain on your body can be devastating in a long term situation.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by ladyinwaiting
reply to post by PayMeh
 


Once your body releases that huge surge of adrenaline, you can't just put it back. It's there.
If you intellectually determine it isn't needed, that you've made a mistake, or the circumstances suddenly change, it's all mind control from there. You will have to "talk yourself down".

Plus, after you've calmed down, you'll find you are very exhausted. Try to find a constructive use for it, until it diminishes.

*I'm on a survival thread*


Good point! You really have to manage your breathing and do everything you can to overcome it. And really make sure you're away from the danger when you start to come down.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by PayMeh
 


www.t-nation.com...
Condition Black

effects of heart rate on performance.
Heart Rate (BPM) Condition Effects
60-80 White/Yellow Normal resting heart rate
>115 Fine motor skill deteriorates
115-145 Red Optimal performance level for complex motor skills and visual and cognitive reaction time
>145 Complex motor skills deteriorate
145-175 Gray Black-level performance degradation may begin
>175 Black Cognitive processing deteriorates
Blood vessels constrict
Loss of peripheral vision
Loss of depth perception
Loss of near vision
Auditory exclusion

Grossman calls the earliest stages of this spectrum Condition White. The boundary between here and the next stage, Condition Yellow, is more psychological than physiological.

We first see major physiological changes around 115 beats per minute. Between here and roughly 145 bpm is Condition Red, which is the range in which the body's complex motor skills and reaction times are at their peak.

Next is Condition Gray, which is where major performance degradations begin to show.

Above 175 bpm is Condition Black, which is marked by extreme loss of cognitive and complex motor performance, freezing, fight or flight behavior, and even loss of bowel and bladder control. Here, gross motor skills such as running and charging are at their highest.

Remember, these effects are the product of psychologically induced stress, not physical stress. An increased heart rate doesn't necessarily mean that you're under psychological stress — you can run a few sets of wind sprints and get your heart rate around 200 beats per minute without forgetting how to use your cell phone.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by ladyinwaiting
reply to post by PayMeh
 


Once your body releases that huge surge of adrenaline, you can't just put it back. It's there.
If you intellectually determine it isn't needed, that you've made a mistake, or the circumstances suddenly change, it's all mind control from there. You will have to "talk yourself down".

Plus, after you've calmed down, you'll find you are very exhausted. Try to find a constructive use for it, until it diminishes.

*I'm on a survival thread*


So true. And this exhaustion isn't caused so much by the adrenaline release as it is caused by the cortisol release. It's has such a marked effect, endocrinologists have dubbed it the "cortisol hangover". Unfortunately, this can last up to 4 hours for a man, and even more unfortunately, it can last up to 4 days for a woman. So gentlemen, if you've ever wondered why the woman in your life seems off her game days after you've ticked her off...

And as if there weren't enough reasons to go Fonzie in these situations, once that adrenaline is released, along with losing your peripheral vision, you also lose your depth perception. Visually, the world becomes a one-dimensional tunnel. So if for no other reason than being able to use your darn eyesight, stay calm.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by RRokkyy
reply to post by PayMeh
 


www.t-nation.com...
Condition Black

effects of heart rate on performance.
Heart Rate (BPM) Condition Effects
60-80 White/Yellow Normal resting heart rate
>115 Fine motor skill deteriorates
115-145 Red Optimal performance level for complex motor skills and visual and cognitive reaction time
>145 Complex motor skills deteriorate
145-175 Gray Black-level performance degradation may begin
>175 Black Cognitive processing deteriorates
Blood vessels constrict
Loss of peripheral vision
Loss of depth perception
Loss of near vision
Auditory exclusion

Grossman calls the earliest stages of this spectrum Condition White. The boundary between here and the next stage, Condition Yellow, is more psychological than physiological.

We first see major physiological changes around 115 beats per minute. Between here and roughly 145 bpm is Condition Red, which is the range in which the body's complex motor skills and reaction times are at their peak.

Next is Condition Gray, which is where major performance degradations begin to show.

Above 175 bpm is Condition Black, which is marked by extreme loss of cognitive and complex motor performance, freezing, fight or flight behavior, and even loss of bowel and bladder control. Here, gross motor skills such as running and charging are at their highest.

Remember, these effects are the product of psychologically induced stress, not physical stress. An increased heart rate doesn't necessarily mean that you're under psychological stress — you can run a few sets of wind sprints and get your heart rate around 200 beats per minute without forgetting how to use your cell phone.


Does that scale factor in the effects coupled with adrenaline though? Seems the impairment level is pretty high. =/



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by PayMeh
 


Rokky? Rokky? No? Uhmmm...

Actually adrenaline only improves your gross motor skills, defined as physical maneuvers requiring strength, like running, lifting and punching. This is at the expense of your fine motor skills like writing, lighting a match and aiming a gun. This is one of the many reasons survivalists preach practice, practice, practice. You really don't want to be loading your gun for the second time ever while adrenaline is coarsing through your veins. You want these movements to be as natural as brushing your teeth.

Adrenaline is often credited with making everything better. The coc aine of the endocrine system, if you will.
However, one the only things that it actually does for you is flood your muscles with blood so that when it's time for you to run your buns off, you'll run as fast as your legs can possible carry you. Perspiration and respiration increase dramatically, making your hands slippery for work, but also making your skin slippery and therefore difficult for a predator to grab hold of. Your reasoning skills also suffer a great deal - this is why adrenaline often causes people to react in ways that make you wonder whether they're sincerely intelligent enough to reliably breathe without messing that up. Memory recall becomes all but unreliable, again, emphasizing why practice is essential because when you KNOW how to do something, you aren't relying on memory to tell you how it's done - you're relying on knowledge which resides in a different part of the brain.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by PayMeh

Originally posted by Asktheanimals
I find comfort in the feel of a 1911A in my hand.
Anyone wants conflict with me better come loaded for bear.
I read the whole post last night and thought it was pretty good.


I agree and have my CWP as well. It's a very nice confidence builder for sure! There's an interesting discussion there about knife vs gun though. I'll paraphrase here. The average time it takes to unholster is around 3 seconds and someone who has a knife out can cover 21 feet before you get the draw. For that reason, plus your focus is on your weapon instead of the one that your attacker has, and fear of sustaining a cut bad enough to lose grip on the weapon during the struggle, he recommends not drawing and treating it like you would if you were unarmed. There is a high emphasis on running away though. Which I understand. The thought of a knife fight makes me queasy.


I have always trained my Soldiers that it is better to back track if a knife wielder is coming at you as that will give you time to unholster and ventilate the guy.

It always took a couple of demonstrations though before they got it through their think heads.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by chasingbrahman
reply to post by PayMeh
 


Rokky? Rokky? No? Uhmmm...

Actually adrenaline only improves your gross motor skills, defined as physical maneuvers requiring strength, like running, lifting and punching. This is at the expense of your fine motor skills like writing, lighting a match and aiming a gun. This is one of the many reasons survivalists preach practice, practice, practice. You really don't want to be loading your gun for the second time ever while adrenaline is coarsing through your veins. You want these movements to be as natural as brushing your teeth.

Adrenaline is often credited with making everything better. The coc aine of the endocrine system, if you will.
However, one the only things that it actually does for you is flood your muscles with blood so that when it's time for you to run your buns off, you'll run as fast as your legs can possible carry you. Perspiration and respiration increase dramatically, making your hands slippery for work, but also making your skin slippery and therefore difficult for a predator to grab hold of. Your reasoning skills also suffer a great deal - this is why adrenaline often causes people to react in ways that make you wonder whether they're sincerely intelligent enough to reliably breathe without messing that up. Memory recall becomes all but unreliable, again, emphasizing why practice is essential because when you KNOW how to do something, you aren't relying on memory to tell you how it's done - you're relying on knowledge which resides in a different part of the brain.


Exactly! Adrenaline is pretty much epinephrine so the comparison to uppers is quite accurate. I think there's a parallel to be drawn from what was trying to be portrayed in *gasp* the Matrix (don't kill me). The whole business with don't think, know and the ultimate realization at the end when he overcame his fear of death. Fear and doubt really are the true limitations to your abilities.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex

Originally posted by PayMeh

Originally posted by Asktheanimals
I find comfort in the feel of a 1911A in my hand.
Anyone wants conflict with me better come loaded for bear.
I read the whole post last night and thought it was pretty good.


I agree and have my CWP as well. It's a very nice confidence builder for sure! There's an interesting discussion there about knife vs gun though. I'll paraphrase here. The average time it takes to unholster is around 3 seconds and someone who has a knife out can cover 21 feet before you get the draw. For that reason, plus your focus is on your weapon instead of the one that your attacker has, and fear of sustaining a cut bad enough to lose grip on the weapon during the struggle, he recommends not drawing and treating it like you would if you were unarmed. There is a high emphasis on running away though. Which I understand. The thought of a knife fight makes me queasy.


I have always trained my Soldiers that it is better to back track if a knife wielder is coming at you as that will give you time to unholster and ventilate the guy.

It always took a couple of demonstrations though before they got it through their think heads.


That's really the only good option. Knife defense is a halfhearted name. Running is always the first option even if you're just buying time to draw your weapon. If you're in a tight area though that gets hard. I've racked my brain trying to think of reasonable tactics I'd be comfortable with up against a knife, and for the life of me I can't do it. I always end up telling myself "do your best and pray lady luck's on your side."



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by PayMeh
 


oops, replied to wrong person.
edit on 8/25/2011 by ladyinwaiting because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by chasingbrahman
 



lol.
Women + adrenaline and cortisol = DANGER.

Beware, guys





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