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Survival /Self Defense: stopping the FIGHT or FLIGHT response

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posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 04:33 PM
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Originally posted by ladyinwaiting
reply to post by chasingbrahman
 



lol.
Women + adrenaline and cortisol = DANGER.

Beware, guys


lol.
Women= DANGER.

Beware, guys


FTFY!!




posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 05:05 PM
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If you find your self in a immediate fight or flight situation, you have already failed your ability to read the environment you are in, and will probably be cought of guard no matter what. You wont have time to asses your situation and the immediate dangers surrounding you.

The only way to be prepared for a fight or flight situation is if you are able to evaluate the location and the people at the location before you enter. And act according to pre planed measures.
One should always pre-plan a flight rout as priority number 1. And option two is to not enter the arena/location if priority number 1 seams difficult.

If you want to enter a building for instance, prepare a plan on how you want to move inside. Keep in mind that you must have control over a 360 degree radius at all times. Your main priority inside is to try and reduce the 360 degree radius to at least 180 degrees. You can do that by sticking to the walls for instance, with practice you can learn how to use the awareness of other people as safety.
Learn how to turn quickly with just moving one foot at a time. SWAT teams and SF know how this is done properly, try and see how they move their feet. "I can make some illustration to demonstrate how its done".

How to be aware and move properly is easy to practice in public and at home. At home you can teach your self how to enter through a door properly and how to move inside a room. You can also use the public to learn how to read peoples intentions and behaviour. The sooner you start the more aware you will become.
Implement this into your daily routine and being aware becomes natural.

Being aware means that you will increase your reaction time, which means you will have time to either do a flight or you can get into proper stance to defend. If you teach your self to walk with your hands as close to your belly button as possible at all time, that to will increase your reaction time, and your are already defending a critical body part.



edit on 27.06.08 by spy66 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by PayMeh
 


Well, ya have to think of your tight space as being the immediate body area. It takes practice...but you must realize, as a realist, it doesn't always work.

That is something I always taught as well. I always taught my troops that they may die, they may not get the upper hand.

It's a fact of life. But fear is a great motivator.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by ladyinwaiting
reply to post by chasingbrahman
 



lol.
Women + adrenaline and cortisol = DANGER.

Beware, guys


I've got five older sisters, no need to warn me.


I've always stated that nothing will make a man faster than a tribe of women....


Yikes!



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by spy66
If you find your self in a immediate fight or flight situation, you have already failed your ability to read the environment you are in, and will probably be cought of guard no matter what. You wont have time to asses your situation and the immediate dangers surrounding you.

The only way to be prepared for a fight or flight situation is if you are able to evaluate the location and the people at the location before you enter. And act according to pre planed measures.
One should always pre-plan a flight rout as priority number 1. And option two is to not enter the arena/location if priority number 1 seams difficult.

If you want to enter a building for instance, prepare a plan on how you want to move inside. Keep in mind that you must have control over a 360 degree radius at all times. Your main priority inside is to try and reduce the 360 degree radius to at least 180 degrees. You can do that by sticking to the walls for instance, with practice you can learn how to use the awareness of other people as safety.
Learn how to turn quickly with just moving one foot at a time. SWAT teams and SF know how this is done properly, try and see how they move their feet. "I can make some illustration to demonstrate how its done".

How to be aware and move properly is easy to practice in public and at home. At home you can teach your self how to enter through a door properly and how to move inside a room. You can also use the public to learn how to read peoples intentions and behaviour. The sooner you start the more aware you will become.
Implement this into your daily routine and being aware becomes natural.





Very salient points! Sometimes the most innocent things can start fights though. And despite your best intentions an altercation is inevitable. There are a few situations like this that can arise no matter how much you plan. Fight or Flight kicks in every event that stresses you out. For most of us, it kicked in for the first time in high school trying to talk to the opposite sex and ask them out on a date.

The other things are talked about in depth, just not in the link in the OP. It's kinda a series from the looks of it. You're completely right about everything of course.

About a month after I began practicing and learned how to clear my house properly, I had someone try and break in the basement. From the bedroom with the door shut, I couldn't tell where it was coming from so I cleared the house and then cleared the perimeter doing exactly what is taught. Hugging walls and keeping the sweep angle of engagement as closed off as possible. I'd like to add that you should stay as low as possible too while maintaining the ability to move swiftly. If the intruder hears you they're going to instantly look to where they would expect you to be. If you're somewhere else that buys you a nanosecond or two.

I like the idea laid out in the situational awareness thread about making a game out of it with your family. Everyone can play along, it's fun, and it gets everyone up to speed.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex
reply to post by PayMeh
 


Well, ya have to think of your tight space as being the immediate body area. It takes practice...but you must realize, as a realist, it doesn't always work.

That is something I always taught as well. I always taught my troops that they may die, they may not get the upper hand.

It's a fact of life. But fear is a great motivator.


Very true. Having a stubborn streak helps too. I've always been the kind of person that's hellbent to give as good as I get. Sometimes sheer willpower makes a huge difference.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by PayMeh
 


It brings to mind of that line in the "The Big Red One"

"Did I kill the guy that killed me?"

If someone kills me, I hope I have killed him as well.



posted on Aug, 25 2011 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex
reply to post by PayMeh
 


It brings to mind of that line in the "The Big Red One"

"Did I kill the guy that killed me?"

If someone kills me, I hope I have killed him as well.


Yeah, I'm the same way. I always loved that poster of the crane trying to eat the frog with his hands around it's neck and captioned "Never give up."



posted on Jul, 22 2012 @ 11:16 AM
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I was watching the Dual Survival marathon yesterday and one of the points they brought up how being in high stress situations can make a person lose their motor skills. I looked it up and found an interesting article about it. Then I searched and found this thread which is about a similar topic that I'll just add this too.

The Anatomy of Fear and How It Relates To Survival Training

It has some interesting statistics and information.


  • At 115 beats per minute (bpm) most people will lose fine complex motor skills such as finger dexterity, eye/hand co-ordination, multi-tasking becomes difficult

  • At 145 bpm, most people will lose complex motor skills (3 or more motor skills designed to work in unison)

  • At 185-220 bpm, most people will go into a state of "hypervigilance," also commonly known as the "deer in the headlights" or "brain fart mode." It is not uncommon for a person to continue doing things that are not effective (known as a feedback loop) or to show irrational behavior such as leaving cover. This is also the state in which people find themselves in when they describe that they can not move, yell, or scream.


  • And they also discuss ways of keeping it somewhat in check.


  • One wants to breath in through their nose for a three count, hold for a two count, and then breath out through the mouth for a three count. Studies have found that if a person was to do this for a 3-cycle count, it decreases one’s heart rate up to 30% for up to 40 seconds. Again remember that heart rate is directly related to SSR. If a person’s heart rate was sitting at around 175-220 bpm, autogenic breathing would help bring them back down into that target range of 115-145 bpm.

  • Experience increases and builds confidence - reduces "newness" of stimulus


  • Now that particular article was based more on a gun fight type survival, but it can be used for survival in generally across the board, as high stress situations are going to happen whether you're out in a gun fight or stuck in the wild. So I thought it was a fitting article to post.






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