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Mushrooms on Mars (not a joke)

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posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 06:30 PM
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reply to post by sevensheeps
 


in my opinion this looks like brimstone or fractured mineral basalt (if later then mars is still volcanically active of which there is little evidence) but still venting methane.

i'd lay my bets on brimstone or fossilized brimstone, though i personally think mars is more alive than they let on, but this is not a mushroom, if it was then it would grow and florish in groups or phyla as mushrooms tend to share a resource for survival and reproduction.




posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 06:47 PM
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Certainly looks like a mushroom to me, or some kind of ball, but judging from the distance of the shadow it appears to have some height to it, and fungi can grow almost anywhere.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 07:31 PM
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Originally posted by tomten
reply to post by sevensheeps
 


It is a Spherule.
Look here for more info about Spherules.


Fascinating page you linked tomten, the best explanation on this thread, no less not half the way down on page 2. One photo resembles the mushroom shape perfectly. I also think these tubes could explain that rebar thread someone put up today, perhaps the spherules fell/eroded off of the tubes. I'll make sure I star your post, I never seen the tubes before.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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Wow nice find op...Definitely looks like a type of shroom I've seen before..



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Illustronic
 


didnt think of a spherule! but, yes very much a likeness! yet still hinting of life on mars (in the public domain) and multicellular too! but looking at the orginal pics, its differcult to determine the resolution and magnification, so it could still be brimstone!



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 09:16 PM
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The widest field of view I found for the Microscopic Imager was 70 mm square, down to 3 mm square and didn't dig to find the resolution for the 'mushroom' image, but at most we are looking at an area smaller than a pack of Camel non filter ciggs. But think about reality, mushrooms grow overnight, spoil in a week, and totally biodegrade in less than a month. What are the chances a biological mushroom could ever be fossilized?



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by sevensheeps
 




The "stem" is almost as wide as the crown. It can't be a mushroom as we know them. The earthly ones need lots of moisture and shade. Still it looks unlike a mineral growth which is possible. It may be an inadvertent shot of a fung-oid of a new type. Perhaps long roots and a capacity to resist radiation and dry climate are being seen. I do believe the odds are in favor of plant life on Mars still. Perhaps even subsurface insects and much deeper, in underground lakes perhaps even small fish. It's fun to speculate. I doubt I'll live long enough to find out but I'm going to request my next lifetime be on the Martian colony just for something different.



posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by sevensheeps
 

Hematites.. watch "The Universe" it's pretty informative.. not mushrooms.



edit on 23-8-2011 by 31Bravo because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 06:22 AM
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I have thought about it, and I am left in the middle the problem is that what I said in the beginning nothing is what it seems does also imply the other way around.





posted on Aug, 24 2011 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by sevensheeps
 

Yea I get it.. but I guess it's whatever the eye of the observer sees. I, personally, see a spherical rock made from formations of the terrain over a period of time not a mushroom. We also have them here on Earth as well.. So I guess it could be.. who knows NASA lies all the time.


edit on 24-8-2011 by 31Bravo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 06:05 AM
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Well, one in the eye for all the little negs on here (those touting negative opinions to the op). As you will see op, if you think yours is a muchroom with a stalk, then I have found another stalk Possible new classification opportunity for concretion spherules (blueberries) on Mars

I think all those that think these 'blueberries' are ALL concretions are just plain wrong. Some maybe concretions, yes, but I dont think they all are. Some are fungi and to see why I think this, go to the linked thread and see the evidence there.

To those who agree with NASA that these are concretions, please answer the following.

Where are the weathered and eroded rocks which these concretions come out of. Please show us photos of these rocks.
There are far too many blueberries spread about the rover images to be concretions come out of weathered and eroded rocks and besides, what would have spread them all over a flat area in an almost uniform pattern?

Can't answer this? Well, then you have to at least entertain the possibility that these blueberries are spread by fungi spores which have blown in the wind and been deposited on rocks and the in the cracks between rocks. However, it looks to me as if they grow out of the 'rocks' themselves. (see the other thread for fungi 'buds')



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