A rather boring and trivial question that i have wanted to asked my american friends for a while now

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posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:23 PM
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Ok, i was just flicking channels and Pulp Fiction was on yet again, i must have seen this film 30 times yet it is addictive, Why is it so addictive?,, yet thats another question. My inquiry is this, Mr Wolff (keitel) has just asked Jimmy (Tarantino) for coffee with plenty of sugar and cream. This is my question, in the Uk we drink coffee with sugar and milk, do you american LITERALLY mean cream wth your coffee,how do you cope with such a rich drink. So are we talking single cream then? sorry for such a boring question but its bothered me for ages. So you americans, are you creaming?And am i really boring?
and i will strike down with great anger and furious vengeance those who do not answer my coffee question, only joking mates
edit on 31-7-2011 by thedoctorswife because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by thedoctorswife
 


A normal coffee shop around here usually offers skim milk, whole milk, and cream (plus all those fake artificial flavoring syrups)... Aside from that, I like to sprinkle cinnamon on top of the coffee grounds before brewing, shakes it up a good bit!



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:28 PM
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A lot of people use half and half which is a creamer, some use milk, Some use specific coffee creamer, mainly flavoured sch as amaretto, and such.

I hope this helps.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:29 PM
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It's a light cream.

second.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by thedoctorswife
 


Not whip cream or cream cheese, if that's what you're thinking. I don't personally drink a lot of coffee, but the cream we use is very similar to milk. I am not a coffee expert, but if you want to know what type of propulsion system the Alpha Centaurians use to travel the cosmos, I'm your man. Doctor's wife, huh? You're not bad looking.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:33 PM
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It is actually pretty common to put cream into your coffee in the UK too. Try it - some single cream floated on your freash ground... Yum.

Don't bother with Instant. Fresh coffee with fresh cream is a whole new drink.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:36 PM
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I don't know many that use heavy cream - and if you ask coffee connoisseurs, any milk is blasphemous!
But usually it's a half&half. At the store there is actual coffee creamer - again, like those stated above - it's a light cream and usually flavored. And while on the subject of flavoring coffee - I highly highly recommend mixing a cold vanilla cappuccino with a Mudslide, Vanilla Kahlua Liquor and Baileys Irish Cream. It's the perfect mixed drink when smoking a nice coffee infused cigar. mmmmmmmm



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by thedoctorswife
 




In many parts of the east coffee is served with the question: "regular or black"? And, regarding creme, it can't be beat (no pun). On those occasions when I tried ordinary, even whole, milk I was disappointed with both the look and the taste. More akin to liquid cardboard it was, than good coffee. But no matter within a few years we'll be reduced to serfdom and gruel. The only hot drink we'll see then is whatever flows from the castle scuppers. Oh, that's gruel with creme if you please.

Thanks ever so much...
edit on 31-7-2011 by trailertrash because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by timi0000
 


"You're not bad looking"
HA- thats the best laugh Ive gotten on here in a while!!
you do speak the truth though



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:41 PM
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Originally posted by Seiko
A lot of people use half and half which is a creamer, some use milk, Some use specific coffee creamer, mainly flavoured sch as amaretto, and such.

I hope this helps.

Thanks im sorry for asking such a boring question, but in the Uk its quiet unusual to ask for cream with coffee., mind you, now weve got starbucks and costalotta, they throw all sorts of things in the coffee, flavouring and things, heres an interisting fact, pre starbucks and costa, in the uk we could pick up a cuppa coffee for about 80p, back when i was a little girl there were a lot of italian cafes that did REAL CAPPUCINOS, expresso then frothed milk and back then in the 70s youd pay 20p for a cup, i know find myself living in a world where a starbucks coffee costs 3 quid, i can buy a meal in a caff for that, please no offence meant to you americans personally, been a few times and i love americans but god how bizarre a 3 quid cuppa coffee. i think i should ask for cream just to get value for money.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:42 PM
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reply to post by thedoctorswife
 


Dear thedoctorswife,

Firstly, like your husband I too am a doctor, so you are reading the writings of a doctor and that is by definition authoritative. Unfortunately my doctorate is not in medicine; but, it was worth saying. To get to your question, after consulting with the Book of Humpty Dee, I have found the answer. It is almost never really cream. Back in the day people actually used cream as most lived in farm areas. What we use now in our coffee is either milk or a very light cream not the heavy cream that you are discussing. A great question, the next one is why do we still call it cream, force of habit. It was also common for people to call all colas Coke. Take care and I am awaiting my first patient of the day, she doesn't know my degree isn't in medicine and I would prefer it if nobody said anything.

By the way I gave you a star but no flag because in the time it took me to write this you already had your answer from others. Be well
edit on 31-7-2011 by AQuestion because: To fight the NWO and the use of the edit function



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:43 PM
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BLACK

No sugar

No creamer for me

Most that ruin their coffee use milk or half and half and sugar



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by thedoctorswife
 


I like my coffee the same way I like my gal.

With attitude and bitter.
No cream and suga for me.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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Originally posted by thedoctorswife

Originally posted by Seiko
A lot of people use half and half which is a creamer, some use milk, Some use specific coffee creamer, mainly flavoured sch as amaretto, and such.

I hope this helps.

Thanks im sorry for asking such a boring question, but in the Uk its quiet unusual to ask for cream with coffee., mind you, now weve got starbucks and costalotta, they throw all sorts of things in the coffee, flavouring and things, heres an interisting fact, pre starbucks and costa, in the uk we could pick up a cuppa coffee for about 80p, back when i was a little girl there were a lot of italian cafes that did REAL CAPPUCINOS, expresso then frothed milk and back then in the 70s youd pay 20p for a cup, i know find myself living in a world where a starbucks coffee costs 3 quid, i can buy a meal in a caff for that, please no offence meant to you americans personally, been a few times and i love americans but god how bizarre a 3 quid cuppa coffee. i think i should ask for cream just to get value for money.


Believe me... we think it's just as crazy. And I'm assuming you think it's a lot, because being American.. and a bit ignorant when it comes to other countries money - I have absolutely no effing clue what a s, p or quid means.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 08:46 PM
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Originally posted by AQuestion
reply to post by thedoctorswife
 


Dear thedoctorswife,

Firstly, like your husband I too am a doctor, so you are reading the writings of a doctor and that is by definition authoritative. Unfortunately my doctorate is not in medicine; but, it was worth saying. To get to your question, after consulting with the Book of Humpty Dee, I have found the answer. It is almost never really cream. Back in the day people actually used cream as most lived in farm areas. What we use now in our coffee is either milk or a very light cream not the heavy cream that you are discussing. A great question, the next one is why do we still call it cream, force of habit. It was also common for people to call all colas Coke. Take care and I am awaiting my first patient of the day, she doesn't know my degree isn't in medicine and I would prefer it if nobody said anything.
Your answer was defintly my favourite cream related answer. Im not actually married to a doctor i am just a very sad 40 year old woman with a dr who obsession. Thankyou for the explanation, but why did the farming people use cream when they could have just used milk (Forgive me i lost my agricultural degree certificate down the back of the sofa).
i think we need to get our creams defintion sorted out, half and half=single cream? heavy cream= double cream. and clotted cream, well you dont even wanna go there its what god puts in his coffee.
Apologies for mucking up your post with my editing, rather tired its 3 am ., if By the way I gave you a starb ut no flag because in the time it took me to write this you already had your answer from others. Be well
edit on 31-7-2011 by AQuestion because: To fight the NWO and the use of the edit function
edit on 31-7-2011 by thedoctorswife because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 09:04 PM
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Cream (From Wikipedia)


United States

In the United States, cream is usually sold as:

Half and half (10.5–18% fat)
Light, coffee, or table cream (18–30% fat)
Medium cream (25% fat)
Whipping or light Whipping cream (30–36% fat)
Heavy Whipping cream (36% or more)
Extra-heavy, double, or manufacturer's cream (38–40% or more).

Not all grades are defined by all jurisdictions, and the exact fat content ranges vary. The above figures are based on the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Part 131[2][3] and a small sample of state regulations.


I can see how you might be confused. See below:



United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, the types of cream are legally defined as follows:

Clotted cream:
55%
heat treated
Served as it is. A traditional part of a Cream tea.

Extra-Thick Double cream:
48%
heat treated then quickly cooled
Thickest available fresh cream, spooned onto
pies, puddings, and desserts (cannot be poured
due to its consistency)

Double cream:
48%
Whips the easiest and thickest for puddings
and desserts, can be piped

Whipping cream
35%
Whips well but lighter, can be piped

Whipped cream
35%
has been whipped
Decorations on cakes, topping for ice cream,
strawberries and so on.

Sterilized cream:
23%
is sterilized

Cream or single cream:
18%
is not sterilized
Poured over puddings, used in sauces

Sterilized half cream:
12%
is sterilized

Half cream:
12%
is not sterilized
Uncommon, some cocktails
edit on 7/31/2011 by Ex_CT2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 09:11 PM
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Originally posted by timi0000
reply to post by thedoctorswife
 


Not whip cream or cream cheese, if that's what you're thinking. I don't personally drink a lot of coffee, but the cream we use is very similar to milk. I am not a coffee expert, but if you want to know what type of propulsion system thea.Alpha Centaurians use to travel the cosmos, I'm your man. Doctor's wife, huh? You're not bad looking.

a. not a doctor wife
b. am definirly not gonna spread philadelphia cheese on my coffee.
c.thankyou for the complement. I put it down to drinking vast amounts of mineral water and small amounts of russian vodka,
d. i think my bank manager may be from alpha centauri.



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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for me it really depends on a few things...

while brand and type are factors I find i base
what I add to it depending on the roast.

my preference is a dark roast with heavy cream and no sugar.
the heavy cream adds a distinct texture I enjoy early in the morning
and also serves as a sweetener with out losing
the rich bitter aftertones.

unfortunately not every place has what we want so
when I am purchasing a brew with a more subtle flavor
I find milk and light cream tend to work better to preserve thar flavor
thought they don't sweeten to my liking so I usually end up adding sugar



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 09:32 PM
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Originally posted by CeeRZ
I don't know many that use heavy cream - and if you ask coffee connoisseurs, any milk is blasphemous!
But usually it's a half&half. At the store there is actual coffee creamer - again, like those stated above - it's a light cream and usually flavored. And while on the subject of flavoring coffee - I highly highly recommend mixing a cold vanilla cappuccino with a Mudslide, Vanilla Kahlua Liquor and Baileys Irish Cream. It's the perfect mixed drink when smoking a nice coffee infused cigar. mmmmmmmm

Crikey, id love anight out wth you girl



posted on Jul, 31 2011 @ 09:37 PM
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Originally posted by Ex_CT2
Cream (From Wikipedia)


United States

In the United States, cream is usually sold as:

Half and half (10.5–18% fat)
Light, coffee, or table cream (18–30% fat)
Medium cream (25% fat)
Whipping or light Whipping cream (30–36% fat)
Heavy Whipping cream (36% or more)
Extra-heavy, double, or manufacturer's cream (38–40% or more).

Not all grades are defined by all jurisdictions, and the exact fat content ranges vary. The above figures are based on the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Part 131[2][3] and a small sample of state regulations.


I can see how you might be confused. See below:



United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, the types of cream are legally defined as follows:

Clotted cream:
55%
heat treated
Served as it is. A traditional part of a Cream tea.

Extra-Thick Double cream:
48%
heat treated then quickly cooled
Thickest available fresh cream, spooned onto
pies, puddings, and desserts (cannot be poured
due to its consistency)

Double cream:
48%
Whips the easiest and thickest for puddings
and desserts, can be piped

Whipping cream
35%
Whips well but lighter, can be piped

Whipped cream
35%
has been whipped
Decorations on cakes, topping for ice cream,
strawberries and so on.

Sterilized cream:
23%
is sterilized

Cream or single cream:
18%
is not sterilized
Poured over puddings, used in sauces

Sterilized half cream:
12%
is sterilized

Half cream:
12%
is not sterilized
Uncommon, some cocktails
edit on 7/31/2011 by Ex_CT2 because: (no reason given)

Thankyou at least we have more creams than them





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