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WRITERS. You have to read On Writing.

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posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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That's Stephen King's "Memoir of the Craft."

en.wikipedia.org...

It is entertaining, as he always is BUT he puts things so plainly that anyone can get what writing is about. He answers SO many questions about the art of writing that have been holding me back for years. It's a short book by his standards but what is encompasses and focuses on is GOLD for those that write. He says it's not a textbook. It should be. I've learned more about the Craft in the 3 days of reading this than all of high school and university combined. You like to write? Even if you don't like King, you have to read this book.




posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


I read that a few months back. He definitely keeps the process interesting.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


One of the influential authors of my youth, carried into adulthood. He made me want to be a character in one of his books. I like this quote, because it mentions another amazing book to have: The Elements of Style


Pulitzer Prize winning film critic Roger Ebert commented on the book in his review for the movie Secret Window, which was based on a King novella: "A lot of people were outraged that he [King] was honored at the National Book Awards, as if a popular writer could not be taken seriously. But after finding that his book On Writing had more useful and observant things to say about the craft than any book since Strunk and White's The Elements of Style, I have gotten over my own snobbery."[2]


en.wikipedia.org...

Just to mention it, if you ever want to write screenplays, here is that form's mini-bible (not to all)

STORY


ColoradoJens



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:44 PM
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He references The Elements of Style at length. Oh, and he hates "adverbs".



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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I read that once a year whether I want to or not ;-)



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


Really? Well, if you need any adverb advice, here it is:

Hmmmmm... hmmmmm... hmmmmm!!!

Ready pop?
Yep.
Ready son?
Uh-huh.
Let's go!
Let's go!
One! two!

Lolly, Lolly, Lolly, get your adverbs here.
Lolly, Lolly, Lolly, got some adverbs here.
Come on down to Lolly's, get the adverbs here!
You're going to need
If you write or read,
Or even think about it.

Lolly Lolly Lolly, get your adverbs here.
Got a lot of lolly, jolly adverbs here.
Anything you need and we can make it absolutely clear...

An adverb is a word
(That's all it is! and there's a lot of them)
That modifies a verb,
(Sometimes a verb and sometimes)
It modifies an adjective, or else another adverb
And so you see that it's positively, very, very, necessary.

Lolly, Lolly, Lolly, get your adverbs here.
Father, son, and Lolly selling adverbs here.
Got a lot of adverbs, and we make it clear,
So come to Lolly! (Lolly, Lolly, Lolly)

Hello, folks, this is Lolly, Sr., saying we have every adverb in the book, so come on down and look.

Hello folks, Lolly, Jr. here. Suppose your house needs painting -- how are you going to paint it? That's where the adverb comes in. We can also give you a special intensifier so you can paint it very neatly or rather sloppily.

Hi! Suppose you're going nut-gathering; your buddy wants to know where and when. Use an adverb and tell him!

Get your adverbs!

Use it with an adjective, it says much more,
Anything described can be described some more.
Anything you'd ever need is in the store,
And so you choose very carefully every word you use.

Use it with a verb, it tells us how you did,
Where it happened, where you're going, where you've been.
Use it with another adverb -- that's the end.
And even more...

How, where, or when,
Condition or reason,
These questions are answered
When you use an adverb.

Come and get it!

Lolly, Lolly, Lolly, get your adverbs here.
Quickly, quickly, quickly, get those adverbs here.
Slowly, surely, really learn your adverbs here.
You're going need 'em if you read 'em,
If you write or talk or think about 'em ... Lolly! (Lolly, Lolly, Lolly)

Announcer: If it's an adverb, we have it at Lolly's! Bring along your old adjectives, too - like slow, soft, and sure. We'll fit 'em out with our L-Y attachment and make perfectly good adverbs out of them!

(Get your adverbs here!) Lots of good tricks at Lolly's so come on down.

(Lolly, Lolly, Lolly!)

Adverbs deal with manner, place, time,

(Lolly, Lolly, Lolly!)

Condition, reason,

(Father, son, and Lolly)

Comparison, contrast

(Lolly, Lolly, Lolly)

Enrich your language with adverbs!

(Lolly, Lolly, Lolly)

Besides, they're absolutely free!

(Lolly, Lolly, Lolly)

At your service!

Indubitably!


Lolly lolly lolly Get Your Adverbs Here

ColoradoJens



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 




King's contention is that excessive use of adverbs is for writers that are either timid in their skills or pretentious bastids.

"Tim blathered on excessively." Is "excessively" needed? Or has the scene already been set that we already KNOW it's excessive?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


I hear you, rather loudly and very clearly, to be truthfully and sincerly honest with you.


Side note: Do you have a favorite Stephen King book, or is it just this one that interests you?

ColoradoJens



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by ColoradoJens
Side note: Do you have a favorite Stephen King book, or is it just this one that interests you?

ColoradoJens


If a gun was put to my head I would have to say Different Seasons(4 novellas). Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption was amazing. Apt Pupil and The Body as well. It would be easier for me to point out his stinkers, yup, he has had them too. He's only about 13 years older than me. I didn't catch Carrie in hard cover but have been reading him since then.

He says he's not a great writer and as prolific a reader as he is who am I to disagree BUT I think he's one of the best "storytellers" in memory.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


Different Seasons was great. I remember reading one story called "The Mangler" about a killer washing machine in one of the first short story books from him I had. Can't remeber what it was called, but I really liked that one and one about some beer drinking dad that turns into a slimly bug type thing...ANYTHING that get's one interested in writing and storytelling is great!

CJ



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by ColoradoJens
 


Night Shift. Just reread it. Lots of good short stories there.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by intrepid
 


Ahh yes, Night Shift, thank you. Seventh grade in the car on a road trip to Arizona for Spring Break with the family...perfect for any old Fangoria Fan...
Did that one have the "Springheel Jack" story?

ColoradoJens
edit on 14-6-2011 by ColoradoJens because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
reply to post by ColoradoJens
 




King's contention is that excessive use of adverbs is for writers that are either timid in their skills or pretentious bastids.

"Tim blathered on excessively." Is "excessively" needed? Or has the scene already been set that we already KNOW it's excessive?



I read this book about a year ago. It's completely changed the way I write, which is mostly on ATS (haha), the way I talk, and has ruined my old love of reading trashy romance novels on the side. I didn't just lose my cred did I?
Anyway, I CAN NOT read anything with adverbs now. Nor can I tolerate too much punctuation, if King says that I can quit using "quotes" and needless punctuation, I am doing it. Right now. See? Short and to the point.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:37 PM
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Too funny. I have every book ever written by King, including short stories in TV guides, books on tape, screenplays, yearly desk calenders and other fun SK stuff. On Writing is the only one I haven't read.
I skimmed it but I really don't have interest in it.
edit on 14-6-2011 by CoherentlyConfused because: Removed unnecessary, foolish and space-wasting adverbs.

edit on 14-6-2011 by CoherentlyConfused because: Removed quotes

edit on 14-6-2011 by CoherentlyConfused because: typo

edit on 14-6-2011 by CoherentlyConfused because: Maybe I need to read this book.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by CoherentlyConfused
edit on 14-6-2011 by CoherentlyConfused because: Maybe I need to read this book.



I think you got it right that time.

edit on 14-6-2011 by intrepid because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2011 @ 01:44 AM
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reply to post by intrepid
 

Yes. Now if only he could actually write, one might be inclined to take his advice seriously.

As for Strunk & White and other prescriptive style manuals, they are poison to anyone who hopes to write creatively. Perhaps they are of some use to linguistically challenged high-school students needing to turn in an essay, or junior office employees wishing to appear literate when composing a business letter.

A post of mine in another thread explains why prescriptive grammar is nonsense. This is true for prescriptive stylistics, too.


edit on 28/6/11 by Astyanax because: the problem isn’t just with Stephen.



posted on Jul, 18 2011 @ 09:52 PM
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Yep - thanks for the (only slightly painful) reminder. Time to pick up the tome once again...

Great stuff, Maynard G!



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