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Amazing Extreme 3D Sidewalk Chalk Drawings

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posted on Jun, 13 2011 @ 12:36 AM
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Chalk is a great drawing medium for anyone because it can be used on sidewalks, walls, paper and other media.I thought these were interisting to look at and are so amazing..





posted on Jun, 13 2011 @ 12:37 AM
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Guinness World Record holding street painter Tracy Lee Stum; fantastic original 3D anamorphic and interactive chalk art; street paintings from around the world.



posted on Jun, 13 2011 @ 01:05 AM
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Thanks for the bumps to whoever gave them to me that was nice



posted on Jun, 13 2011 @ 01:53 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 

I can't remember exactly when, but I think it was last year, when I first saw similar types of street art. 1 in particular was an animal, and it looked like the person was on it's back, and a couple others. I was impressed by those. Partly, because I had just stumbled upon the pics, and wasn't really sure what I was looking at.

Those pics, that I was impressed with, do not even come close to these. These are quite amazing. With the details and colors, I would not have guessed these were chalk, if I had not already known.

I have a couple questions though.
How long do they last? I would assume that many will be walked on, and if not, it will rain sometime.




Is that drawn also, or is that a real rope?



posted on Jun, 13 2011 @ 02:22 AM
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Originally posted by BrokenCircles
reply to post by sugarcookie1
 

I can't remember exactly when, but I think it was last year, when I first saw similar types of street art. 1 in particular was an animal, and it looked like the person was on it's back, and a couple others. I was impressed by those. Partly, because I had just stumbled upon the pics, and wasn't really sure what I was looking at.

Those pics, that I was impressed with, do not even come close to these. These are quite amazing. With the details and colors, I would not have guessed these were chalk, if I had not already known.

I have a couple questions though.
How long do they last? I would assume that many will be walked on, and if not, it will rain sometime.




Is that drawn also, or is that a real rope?


From what i understand chalk art can last a day, weeks or months depending on how they treat the surface and finished artwork..And with rain It depends how heavy the rain is - if it's a light rain they cover the artwork. They must last a long time even if people walk on it because professional cleaners have be brought in after the event to clean the site..I'm thinking the rope is drawn also ..I think it takes some real talent to draw this stuff its just amazing.. Thanks for your reply



posted on Jun, 13 2011 @ 04:09 AM
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reply to post by sugarcookie1
 
I went on Tracy Lee Stum's website. She has caused me to change my opinion. At first, I saw it as somewhat sad, that these works of art are only temporary. I like her view on that.


Street paintings are not meant to last - I believe this is what makes them so remarkable. Like Tibetan sand paintings or a musical performance, they live by their creation and then fade away into memory.


How long does a street painting last?

Depending on location, weather and traffic, a street painting can be visible for many months after it has been completed - not clearly but faintly. Rain, moisture, wind and traffic will diminish its beauty very quickly, but typically it can be seen in a fairly good condition for a few weeks after its completion, if passer-byers respect it by not walking on it.

[color=AFC7C7]I do find, however, a certain beauty in the way a street painting ages. It becomes a ghost of itself, fading like an old world fresco, mysteriously hinting at what once was.
Tracy Lee Stum - Q & A


She has a good slideshow too.
Tracy Lee Stum - Portfolio/Slideshow


This is the only one that I saw, that showed it from 2 different angles. It is interesting, to look at it from a different perspective.





If it rains you can try to save your image with plastic, etc. but this can create more harm than good so we usually just start all over when the weather clears up. Wind can also be damaging as strong gusts can literally blow half of your street painting away. Because this art form is about process I use these challenges as opportunities to rework the image in a new way.

[color=AFC7C7]I absolutely enjoy the freedom of not being attached to my drawing in a possessive way, which allows me to be in the moment throughout the process.



posted on Jun, 13 2011 @ 10:26 PM
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Originally posted by BrokenCircles
reply to post by sugarcookie1
 
I went on Tracy Lee Stum's website. She has caused me to change my opinion. At first, I saw it as somewhat sad, that these works of art are only temporary. I like her view on that.


Street paintings are not meant to last - I believe this is what makes them so remarkable. Like Tibetan sand paintings or a musical performance, they live by their creation and then fade away into memory.


How long does a street painting last?

Depending on location, weather and traffic, a street painting can be visible for many months after it has been completed - not clearly but faintly. Rain, moisture, wind and traffic will diminish its beauty very quickly, but typically it can be seen in a fairly good condition for a few weeks after its completion, if passer-byers respect it by not walking on it.

[color=AFC7C7]I do find, however, a certain beauty in the way a street painting ages. It becomes a ghost of itself, fading like an old world fresco, mysteriously hinting at what once was.
Tracy Lee Stum - Q & A


She has a good slideshow too.
Tracy Lee Stum - Portfolio/Slideshow


This is the only one that I saw, that showed it from 2 different angles. It is interesting, to look at it from a different perspective.





If it rains you can try to save your image with plastic, etc. but this can create more harm than good so we usually just start all over when the weather clears up. Wind can also be damaging as strong gusts can literally blow half of your street painting away. Because this art form is about process I use these challenges as opportunities to rework the image in a new way.

[color=AFC7C7]I absolutely enjoy the freedom of not being attached to my drawing in a possessive way, which allows me to be in the moment throughout the process.



Thank you for posting the slide show such beautiful work i wish i had this kind of talent my best would be stick people ..This work should be on canvas its all just exquisite
plus the 3D makes you want to walk around it in fear of falling into it or just plain messing it up ..The Tibetan sand paintings are also something to take in i saw one a few years back i cant imagine takeing grains of sand and working into something so impressive..thanks for your reply BrokenCircles



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 01:14 AM
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Originally posted by sugarcookie1
Thank you for posting the slide show such beautiful work i wish i had this kind of talent my best would be stick people .

The Tibetan sand paintings are also something to take in i saw one a few years back i cant imagine takeing grains of sand and working into something so impressive.

Same with me, as far as the stick people. The only things that I can draw, must be abstract and resemble absolutely nothing in reality.

At first, I was thinking that some sort of clear-coat could be applied over these, to extend the life. I hadn't thought about the image possibly smearing and becoming somewhat distorted, until after reading this ↓↓.


Can you make them permanent?

Chalk pastel is not a highly stable medium that does not bond, like paint, with the surface it is applied to. [color=AFC7C7]There really is no sealer or preservative you can apply to it without creating some damage. I have created many ‘street paintings' on artificial surfaces with intentions to preserve them and have been somewhat successful in this effort. These paintings however, are not meant to be walked on or handled, which helps maintain the life of the piece.

Q & A


I wasn't familiar with Tibetan Sand Painting. I did a quick search, and looked at several of them, but haven't yet watched any videos of the process. It does not look easy. You would need alot of patience, and an ability to not become agitated. Just by looking at some of the pictures, I can tell that is something that could easily make me mad lol. Would be too easy, to make one little mistake, and get mad at it, and just swipe your arm across the whole thing.


...... and thank you for posting the videos.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 08:27 AM
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That's incredible, such talent!
I could never draw something so extraordinary. I love 3D art.



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 12:55 AM
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Originally posted by lllNixielll
That's incredible, such talent!
I could never draw something so extraordinary. I love 3D art.


Im glad you enjoyed the chalk art ..I wish i had that kind of talent also thanks for the reply



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 02:08 PM
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Nice find cookie

Here is something you
may find interesting.

sorry, try this
www.youtube.com...
edit on 15-6-2011 by 43LEO729 because: bad link



posted on Jun, 15 2011 @ 02:37 PM
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Originally posted by 43LEO729
Nice find cookie

Here is something you
may find interesting.

sorry, try this
www.youtube.com...
edit on 15-6-2011 by 43LEO729 because: bad link


Thanks Leo! great video also..I never thought about it but doing this chalk painting must be back breaking! I just adore people that have wonderful talents like this..




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