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Where Is Now Comet Elenin , C/2010 X1 ?

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posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 07:16 AM
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Here is original picture only cut end zoomed ..



Only brightness end contrast balanced different ..





Peace ..
edit on 11-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 07:20 AM
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reply to post by Dalke07
 


Wow dude, I can't believe people think they know everything about it. Just look at it. It's no good at all. Definitely worth worrying about.

Seeing it this far out. This is going to be an epic year for mankind.
edit on 11-6-2011 by MasterAndrew because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 07:34 AM
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Originally posted by this_is_who_we_are

Oops. I guess I can't trust everything I find on the internet. I plugged your data into my Stellarium. Thanks.

edit on 6/11/2011 by this_is_who_we_are because: smiley


You can use this: projects.familie-steinel.de...
to easily convert the elements from the JPL/HORIZONS website to the Stellarium format.

Refer to the wiki: www.stellarium.org...
for how to find the body in the JPL database and create osculating elements with an epoch close to the planned time of observation¹ and then instead of manually deciphering and re-formatting the horizons output as described on that wiki page simply paste it all into the above website and click the parse button.

___
¹) It is important that you do this every time you plan to observe it. Stellarium is using simple 2-body mechanics to extrapolate it so it will be only accurate for a few weeks or even only days around the time for which the elements have been created. JPL on the other hand will take all gravitational influences and perturbations into account and can generate elements for any other time in the future or the past that are then most accurate around that specified time (but always only at around that time!).

edit on 11-6-2011 by prof7 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 08:24 AM
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Please "ngchunter" post here some newest picture in future or older if you have is very interesting to see real picture end I'm very surprised ..

Next time plz put time end exactly coordinate in that moment, need names of that neighboring starts or similar from that or other pictures ..



Peace end tnx ..


edit on 11-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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Here is a small HowTo about how to find it (or any other body) at the JPL website and convert it into the Stellarium format. Its a bit huge, you should download the image and open it separately.

Link: Link to this image





edit on 11-6-2011 by prof7 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-6-2011 by prof7 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-6-2011 by prof7 because: (no reason given)

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edit on 11-6-2011 by prof7 because: its quite complicated to embed images and links in this forum...

edit on 11-6-2011 by prof7 because: atsimg tag is broken. This forum is broken.



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by prof7
 


Thank you prof7 for that extra explanation ..



ssd.jpl.nasa.gov...


Peace ..

edit on 11-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 01:02 PM
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Here some coolers corrections only, brightness end contrast correction in first place ..


edit on 11-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 11 2011 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by Dalke07
 


Any more pictures?



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


I am not convinced that is a comet. Second like.



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 01:29 PM
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Originally posted by Sky watcher
I am not convinced that is a comet.



Too faint to be a brown dwarf.
Too fuzzy to be an asteriod.
Doesnt stay in the same place, so not a star.
Too well photographed worldwide to be a hoax.
Exactly the right brightness to be a wimpy comet.

Do you actually have an opinion on what it is or are you all "dunno" mode?



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 01:42 PM
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Originally posted by MasterAndrew
reply to post by Dalke07
 


That looks huge!!! Is there more pics like this???

Huge? Heh heh heh, no, that's not huge. Here's what comet lulin looked like through the same telescope and an even wider field of view:
farm4.static.flickr.com...
farm4.static.flickr.com...
That's what I'd call a good, but not great, comet. Elenin's got a long way to go to reach that level.



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by MasterAndrew
Just look at it. It's no good at all. Definitely worth worrying about.

What made you come to that conclusion?



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by Dalke07

Please "ngchunter" post here some newest picture in future or older if you have is very interesting to see real picture end I'm very surprised ..

Next time plz put time end exactly coordinate in that moment, need names of that neighboring starts or similar from that or other pictures ..

edit on 11-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)

This is the same image (just fewer images stacked and not as heavy on the contrast) but astrometrically solved. You can confirm the coordinates of the comet and stars in the image:
www.flickr.com...
edit on 12-6-2011 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by Sky watcher
reply to post by ngchunter
 


I am not convinced that is a comet. Second like.

Here's a cleaner image, you can clearly see its tail pointing to the left side of the image:
flickr.com...
edit on 12-6-2011 by ngchunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by ngchunter
This is the same image (just fewer images stacked and not as heavy on the contrast) but astrometrically solved.


Oh wow. astrometry.net
Thats a bloody handy resource that I never knew existed before. Do you at least need to give it a rough set of coords and image size?
Havnt taken any photos in years - not since the days of hypered film. Should get a CCD camera. Any recommendations for an introductory camera for my old Meade 2080 (8 inch cat.)?



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by alfa1
Do you at least need to give it a rough set of coords and image size?

Nope, completely automated and unbiased. Plus it's handy for sharing. That's why I love it.


Havnt taken any photos in years - not since the days of hypered film. Should get a CCD camera. Any recommendations for an introductory camera for my old Meade 2080 (8 inch cat.)?

Oh wow, yeah man, I've still got an old roll of technical pan sitting around that I'm sure's no good at this point but makes for a nice memento of days gone by. I didn't quite get as far as hypering film before the CCD revolution overtook me. I started out with film for solar system photography though. If the 2080 has a guide port I would recommend any CCD that has self-guiding capabilities, a used ST-7E would do nicely. Those seem to run for around 1500 on the used market. If you have to do all the guiding manually I guess you'll have to stick with an off-axis guider, but you can spend less on the CCD or get more resolution/sensitivity for your buck. Then it becomes a question of how much processing you want to do with the images, how much resolution you want, and if you'd rather have increased sensitivity/resolution and use a monochrome camera (with filter wheel as desired), or less sensitivity/resolution and single shot color imaging. ATIK makes some nice cameras for either that are good for all-around use (planetary and deep space).
www.optcorp.com...
www.optcorp.com...
www.optcorp.com...
www.optcorp.com...



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 06:51 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 




In the image above, you can clearly see the tail of the object as it whizzes along on its wimpy little orbit.

Just saying. Have you seen it from every angle yet?

Who's to know, huh? Whatever will be, and all that. Hope it really is a wimpy little comet...



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 08:09 PM
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You're clearly having me on - thats an illustration rather then an actual photo



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 10:09 PM
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I have a huge interest in this as it looks from the first pics posted here that it clearly looks like the illustration just posted. I don't think it is a comet either. this huge object is going to past so close to Earth it's going to be phenomenal.



posted on Jun, 12 2011 @ 10:33 PM
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Originally posted by FlyInTheOintment
In the image above, you can clearly see the tail of the object ...


Running that image through tineye (an image search engine), there are links to pages from 2009 and 2008, long before comet Elenin was discovered.
Here as an example is a greek page from 2009, talking about Nibiru.
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