It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What is this in google sky? different object.

page: 3
7
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:40 AM
link   
reply to post by thorazineshuffle
 


As I posted above, an on another thread about that video:

The object that shows up in the infrared layer in Google Earth isCW Leonis, a dying star about 400 light years distant that is one of the brightest infrared sources outside out solar system. Also, the infrared layer in Google Earth comes from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite survey conducted in 1985. It's not anywhere close to a "live" view.




posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:53 AM
link   
reply to post by thorazineshuffle
 


Yes, I did. He states that CW Leonis is "Nibiru" how he came to this conclusion I do not know. I thought Elenin was Nibiru? Why does he talk about a bunch of other random stars and planets?

I don't really see anything in that video that challenges the evidence that nataylor put forward.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:54 AM
link   
reply to post by nataylor
 


Ok I get it now. Thanks! I did not realize that google earth used data that was so old. Very interesting, nonetheless.



posted on Jun, 18 2011 @ 09:00 AM
link   
reply to post by anonymous1
 

source
This photos coordinates don't match yours but; the time that google published their pics is hard for me to determine. I believe the two are the same.

edit on (6/18/1111 by loveguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 21 2011 @ 11:25 AM
link   
reply to post by loveguy
 


You do know that those black boxes are only gaps in Google Sky's data?

And that there's plenty of other sources to fully see the location in question?

Right?



posted on Jun, 23 2011 @ 06:23 AM
link   
reply to post by MisterMan
 

Yeah.
I cross-referenced from Stellarium.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 08:44 AM
link   

Originally posted by loveguy
reply to post by MisterMan
 

Yeah.
I cross-referenced from Stellarium.

Set stellarium's date to 1983. You're looking at google's stitched mosaic of the IRAS all-sky survey which was recorded in less than a year in 1983. If you set stellarium back to that date and look at those coordinates you'll have your answer. The data is not blocked out of the original distribution of IRAS data, but google uses a reprocessed dataset where it was removed. All-sky surveys are not supposed to include planets, but given the limited time due to limited coolant and the fact that they had to scan the entire sky line by line using a single column CCD, they ended up catching this planet twice on two different dates after it had moved a little, creating a double image.



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 09:02 AM
link   
I wish people would stop using public free software to try and indicate some kind of stupid 'discovery'. Like what? Are you the only person in the world to see that?!! Get real, Jeez-O-Pete!



posted on Jun, 24 2011 @ 09:20 AM
link   

Originally posted by amaster

Originally posted by tomten

Originally posted by thorazineshuffle
www.google.com...

search for moon, then pull back a little, then push infrared.
I would love to hear an explanation.


edit on 7-6-2011 by thorazineshuffle because: (no reason given)


That, my friend.
Is our own belowed Galaxy; Milkyway.
Seen from it's edge, as we always do.


Forgive my ignorance in asking this, but how can we see our galaxy? I'm assuming that this statement refers to the center of our galaxy and not our galaxy as a whole since we are viewing it from the inside.


TA DAAAAAAAA *jazz hands*
formyhour.com...



new topics

top topics



 
7
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join