What is this in google sky? different object.

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posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


I do not understand the historical view. looks interesting though.
edit on 7-6-2011 by thorazineshuffle because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by Karilla
 


Yeah, sadly I live in a big city so sadly I'm not afforded that spectacular view.

Now as that refers to this object, it sits outside of this "galaxy cloud" so I don't think it would be the center.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:06 AM
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This is just a guess, but could it possibly be a supernova remnant? This would explain it showing up only in the infrared, and it being remarkably close to the star on the historical view. Maybe?



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:10 AM
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Well before Phage or anybody else comes along and debunks this with already known astronomical bodies. Let's take a quick minute and run down the standard list and eliminate the possibilities.





posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:14 AM
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The infrared data on Google Sky comes from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) whole-sky survey conducted in 1983. If you go to the catalog overlay search page, and put in the coordinates of the object (roughly 9h 47m 48s, 13° 18' 53"), with a 2.5 degree size, you can clearly see the object in the search results:



By clicking on the point source table link, we can see the list of point sources. The one with the largest flux is object 09452+1330.

By searching for that object name on Google, we find that this is also known as IRC +10216 or CW Leonis. As Wikipedia says:


IRC +10216 or CW Leonis is a well-studied carbon star that is embedded in a thick dust envelope. It was first discovered in 1969 by a group of astronomers led by Eric Becklin, based upon infrared observations made with the 62 inches (1.6 m) Caltech Infrared Telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory. Its energy is emitted mostly at infrared wavelengths. At a wavelength of 5 μm, it was found to have the highest flux of any object outside the Solar System.


So what we have here is a dying star about 400 light years away. It just happens to be a very bright IR source.
edit on 7-6-2011 by nataylor because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by amaster
 


You can see the Milky Way from our Solar System because we are the outskirts of the galaxy. They teach this is middle school.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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Is HR3882
Some thread from 2008
www.abovetopsecret.com...








edit on 7-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by aceto
 


Yeah, I didn't pay too much attention in middle school.


I zoomed out a little more and included someother location that I thought might be of interst and this is what I got.




Sorry, I don't know how to embed it without cutting off the right side of the picture.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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That is weird.
edit on 7-6-2011 by thorazineshuffle because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:22 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 

I think Google maps are not correct end you are wrong for this ..
Is HD 84748
HR3882 on MWorldWide Telescope
Object are on: 9h 47m 33s, +11 25' 44"

irsa.ipac.caltech.edu... bmit

edit on 7-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by Dalke07
 


No, the object everyone is talking about is definitely CW Leonis. The object you're linking to, R Leonis is lower in the sky.

Here is the view from Google sky with the red arrow indicating the position 09h 47m 57.406s, 13° 16′ 43.56″ for CW Leonis and the green arrow indicating the position 09h 47m 33.4904s, 11° 25′ 43.646″ for R Leonis:



Also, R Leonis is much dimmer in IR and would not produce such blooming in the IR image. CW Leonis is one of the brightest IR objects outside the solar system.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 02:57 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 


Hmm..
Google end MWorldW Telescope is not same maps ..
You have maybe MWorldWide Telescope ??
I zoom out only, watch coordinate right down ..
All picture on this post I make in MWW Telescope end coordinate are 9h 47m 33s, +11 25' 44"

edit on 7-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by Dalke07
 


That image is in the visible spectrum. We're looking at the IR spectrum in Google Sky. CW Leonis is much brighter than R Leonis in IR, while the opposite is true in the visible spectrum.



posted on Jun, 7 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by nataylor
 


o0 I know my frend ..
I use 2Mass synthetic, Near infrared end infrared but not on G.E ..
First 2 picture are infrared, 3th normal, 4th are in 2Mass synthetic, Near infrared ..
On MWW telescope you have 18 different way of imagery, all intresting picture are one that coordinate I put ..
Download WorldWide Telescope you like them end is free, you have all on that software ..
edit on 7-6-2011 by Dalke07 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2011 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by amaster

Originally posted by tomten

Originally posted by thorazineshuffle
www.google.com...

search for moon, then pull back a little, then push infrared.
I would love to hear an explanation.

edit on 7-6-2011 by thorazineshuffle because: (no reason given)


That, my friend.
Is our own belowed Galaxy; Milkyway.
Seen from it's edge, as we always do.


Forgive my ignorance in asking this, but how can we see our galaxy? I'm assuming that this statement refers to the center of our galaxy and not our galaxy as a whole since we are viewing it from the inside.


We can see our own galaxy, because it is close...
And because our location is out on the edge of the galaxy.

See panorama picture here:
Milkyway panorama photo



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 10:31 AM
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There is a strong YouTube video that points to this object being a dark star. I will post the link when I get on my laptop.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:04 AM
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www.youtube.com... hers the link.. watch this!!!!



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by thorazineshuffle
 


Did you completely ignore nataylor's post? Scroll up the page a little bit.



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by James1982
 


I didn't ignore it. Did you watch the YouTube clip?



posted on Jun, 14 2011 @ 11:38 AM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


That is the funniest graph I have ever seen Slayer, lmao





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