It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Short tempers linked to lung cancer!!

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 25 2011 @ 06:56 PM
link   
Young adults with a short temper or mean disposition also tend to have compromised lung function, says a recent study published in the journal Health Psychology, by the American Psychological Association (APA). This occurred even when asthma and smoking were ruled out as possible causes of lung dysfunction.

In a study of 4,629 Black and White 18-30 year olds from four metropolitan areas (sampled from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in (Young) Adults Study cohort (CARDIA), psychologists examined whether the tendency to be hostile went along with having decreased lung function in otherwise healthy young adults. The results indicated that the more hostile one's personality—characterized by aggression or anger, for example—the lower levels one's of lung function even after controlling for age, height, socioeconomic status, smoking status and presence of asthma.

People with higher levels of general frustration predicted statistically significant reductions in pulmonary function for Black women, White women, and Black men. The only marginally strong finding occurred among the White men sampled. The authors speculate that people in lower status roles, Black women, White women, and Black men, who display hostility (and may be pushing against social expectations), elicit stronger social consequences than White men, resulting in higher levels of internalized stress that can make them sick. Further research is required to rule out if environmental toxins such as air pollution may contribute to both higher hostility and lower lung function.

Hostility was measured using the Cook-Medley Questionnaire which is derived from the items on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Pulmonary function was measured while participants were standing and wearing a nose clip, blowing into a machine to measure their lung capacity, which can indicate upper airway obstruction.

"Recent research demonstrates that greater hostility predicts lung function decline in older men. This is the first study of young adults to offer a detailed examination of the inverse link between hostility and pulmonary function," states lead author and psychologist Benita Jackson, PhD, MPH, of Smith College. "It's remarkable to see reductions in lung function during a time of life we think of as healthy for most people. Right now, we can't say if having a hostile personality causes lung function decline, though we now know that these things happen together. More research is needed to establish whether hostility is associated with change in pulmonary function during young adulthood." This research has implications for future research exploring the possible influence of social status on personality functioning and pulmonary health.




posted on May, 25 2011 @ 06:58 PM
link   
Threads like this make me sooooooooo pissed offffff!!!! (cough cough)



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 07:01 PM
link   
good thing my smokes keep my temper under control



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 07:14 PM
link   


The results indicated that the more hostile one's personality—characterized by aggression or anger, for example—the lower levels one's of lung function even after controlling for age, height, socioeconomic status, smoking status and presence of asthma.


This actually suprises me. I mean that taking these factor into consideration, is it even possible to have an accurate study? I understand age, height, and maybe socioeconomic status (although I don't understand what one's socioeconomic status has to do with this), but the smoking and asthma would almost make it impossible to have an accurate experiment, in my opinion. Good find though, it is interesting and suprising.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 07:29 PM
link   
Here's a link to Psych Central with the article:

psychcentral.com...

Interesting study, good find. I wonder what made them consider that those factors might be linked?



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 07:32 PM
link   
Very interesting study/post OP. More evidence that biology alone does not account for one's risk for many an ailment. There have been similar studies that illustrate the obvious link between anger/temper/negativity and all types of heart ailments, cancers and brain functions.

I remember reading about a 110 year old woman who said she smoked for nearly 80 years. Her advice for longevity? "Live life happy and grateful."
edit on 25-5-2011 by ateuprto because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 08:20 PM
link   
Great, thanks OP for ruining my day



Seriously, I quit smoking 5 1/2 years ago to lower that risk. I try to work on my temper but it usually gets the better of me.

Stupid study.


Raist



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 08:31 PM
link   
I'm thinking maybe its breathing habits. yours more relaxed if you take deeper breaths?



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 10:34 PM
link   
reply to post by OrganicAnagram33
 


I wonder what made them consider that those factors might be linked?

Short temper and reduced lung function? Maybe they noticed that some people get out of breath when they’re angry. Or do you mean the following factors?


The results indicated that the more hostile one’s personality—characterized by aggression or anger, for example—the lower levels one’s of lung function even after controlling for age, height, socioeconomic status, smoking status and presence of asthma.

Those are all factors known to affect lung function. The relationship between lung function and socioeconomic status is studied here. It seems to be quite well established. Generally speaking, low socioeconomic status correlates with poorer health statistics – as you might expect.



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join