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Tesco Tagging Clothes

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posted on May, 25 2011 @ 02:31 AM
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Have just heard whispers in the office where I work (sister I believe worked there) that Tesco are looking to place tags in their own branded clothes to tell when you go into different tesco stores and how often, even if you dont buy anything.

To me this would be major news and it wouldnt happen. personally, I feel that this would never happen no matter how big they got. Sheeple wouldnt allow this would they?

Smell BS but any thoughts?




posted on May, 25 2011 @ 04:59 AM
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reply to post by Gregandgemma
 


smells UTTER BS to me

such a " plan " would produce no statistically usefull data what so ever , if tesco wanted to track people - they would issue traceable " tesco club cards " - but even then what data would it produce ?



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 05:10 AM
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I cant see this happening to be honest, it breaks so many UK laws i.e Invastion of Privicy for a start.

If they was gonna do something like this they would have done it with their club card scheme.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 05:25 AM
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reply to post by wlasikiewicz
 


But since when were these corporations ever accountable to the law? I Agree this is far fetched but its the sort of thing Tesco would attempt.
edit on 25-5-2011 by Firefly_ because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 06:05 AM
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The customer card would make more sense. People own alot of different brands of clothes. If I were to go shop at a store, I am not going to intentionally wear that stores brand to go shop there. I think this idea is too expensive and not going to track people's purchases, however a store rewards card would, because someone would use it each time they shop there for their extra discounts or rewards or whatever. And would washing and drying not eventually ruin the device? My kid cuts tags out of all her clothes anyway, and I cut the annoying ones out too, so many would go straight onto the trash.

But, I agree, if this were done is it BS.


 
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posted on May, 25 2011 @ 06:18 AM
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That's crazy OP. Get this!! I hate wearing short sleeved shirts because I have the arms of a nine year old girl, so I only ever wear long sleeved shirts. The best ones are from George in Asda because the material doesn't go funny after a couple of washes it stays sweet. But the other week I went in to Asda to get some of these fine ass long sleeved gold shirts and while I was waiting in the queue, some customer was arguing with the cashier. She was saying that when she washed her sons hoody, bought from George, the washing machine stopped and smoke came out.

When she opened the washing machine she pulled it out and the hood part, you know where the strings are to tighten the hood? Yea well where they are, all along the front of that then toward the back of the neck was burned/singed. She was claiming at the time that something was inside the hood, I've thought about it a few times and though Yeah that kid was a stoner and probably lit his hood on fire. But reading this I wonder....



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 06:30 AM
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Im pretty sure that the points card would already gather this information for them.

Would seem like a better choice too as youre more likely to have the card on you than be wearing that crap # they call clothing on your back.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 06:35 AM
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Originally posted by opal13
The customer card would make more sense. People own alot of different brands of clothes. If I were to go shop at a store, I am not going to intentionally wear that stores brand to go shop there. I think this idea is too expensive and not going to track people's purchases, however a store rewards card would, because someone would use it each time they shop there for their extra discounts or rewards or whatever. And would washing and drying not eventually ruin the device? My kid cuts tags out of all her clothes anyway, and I cut the annoying ones out too, so many would go straight onto the trash.

But, I agree, if this were done is it BS.


 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



They do already use sales data from the loyalty card to 'personalise' your rewards vouchers. Very specific and also thats how they do the comparison shops on the adverts.

Tesco is an almighty company were at last report were showing that £1 in every £8 spent on the UK high street was at Tesco. Absolutely they have the power to make things happen if you get my meaning.



posted on May, 25 2011 @ 07:34 AM
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Read the Op and decided to have a look and found this.

Tesco tests spy chip technolog.

Alok Jha Science correspondent
The Guardian, Saturday 19 July 2003 12.33 BST

The supermarket chain Tesco has admitted testing controversial technology that tracks customers buying certain products through its stores. Anyone picking up Gillette Mach3 razor blades at its Cambridge store will have his or her picture taken.

The Guardian, alerted by Katherine Albrecht, director of US-based Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy and Invasion and Numbering, to the use of the smart electronic tags, has found that tags in the razor blades trigger a CCTV camera when a packet is removed from the shelf. A second camera takes a picture at the checkout and security staff then compare the two images, raising the possibility that they could be used to prevent theft.


By Bill Wilson
BBC News business reporte
Thursday, 27 January 2005, 23:41 GMT

Marks & Spencer is another UK retailer experimenting. The firm has been running an RFID tag trial on men's suits at nine stores, including in Oxford Street, London.

There are hundreds of cases online of shops using this tech and then i saw this.

cnet news
January 13, 2003 6:26 AM PST

KSW-Microtec, a German company, has invented washable RFID tags designed to be sewn into clothing. And according to EE Times, the European central bank is considering embedding RFID tags into banknotes by 2005.

So if as is said its only for in store tracking why the need for ""washable RFID tags designed to be sewn into clothing"".

EE/times
Junko Yoshida
3/11/2003 9:47 AM EST

Clothier Benetton adopts Philips' RFID technology for 'smart' labels
PARIS — Philips Semiconductors' RFID chip will be embedded into the label of every new garment bearing the name of Benetton's core clothing brand, Sisley.

Philips said Tuesday (March 11)) it sewed up the design win with European clothier Benetton through close work with LAB ID, an Italian system integrator. Philips estimated that it will ship 15 million RFID chips, based on its I.CODE ICs, to Benetton in 2003.

IER WEBSITE.

Since the first tests in 2003, IER has been selected by Marks & Spencer to design and supply the RFID inlays (antenna and chip assembly) that are integrated into the garment labels.
In early 2007, Marks & Spencer intends to extend the RFID tagging of 6 clothing departments from 42 to 120 of its 450 U.K. stores. By autumn 2007, the project will then be extended to a further 6 additional clothing departments.

Then we also have RFID chips in credit cards, oyster cards, passports, even some show event tickets, luggage ect.

This is a world wide use of RFID everything from clothes, food (packaging), toys, books, dvd, bueaty products and the list is endless.


On a personal note, about a year ago i was in Boots the chemist and was waiting inline to pay for items i had got. A couple walked through the door and the alarm set off.
A member of staff who had seen them walk into the shop asked them if they had just brought something from another shop. the man said yes he had just brought a hooded top. The shop worker asked him to take it off and walk through the detector, no alarm sounded, but when she waved the hooded top in the sensor the alarm went off.
She said this had happened before and waved the electronic wand over the woven in cord of the hoody and then passed it through the sensor, no alarm.

So yes even after buying an item with a RFID it can still be active.



posted on May, 27 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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I don't see why it seems so far-fetched. I mean Gillette already had chips in their razor packages and was automatically taking pictures of everyone that lifted a cartridge off the shelf without them ever knowing about it. And yes it was against the law and they still did it.

Kraft was putting chips in their Philadelphia Cream Cheese containers. Not sure if they stopped or if they still do.



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