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The College Conspiracy!! NIA's newest documentary!

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posted on May, 14 2011 @ 10:12 PM
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The National Inflation Agency just put out a new doc... If your a subscriber to them like I am, you must have realized they hadnt put out a video in over 2 months... I was impatiently waiting for them to release a new vid! But it was worth the wait...

inflation.us is their website


How far does this hit home with everybody else? Me personally, I always knew there was a good reason to avoid college, I always knew that I didnt want to go into debt in order to learn, or make money... Alot of my friends went to college after graduating about 10 years ago... and almost all of them are unemployed(or had been for over a year in the past few years), or not even working in the same field as they studied...

Not that im doing great for myself, I do have some good ideas on the burner for income, other than grinding out a crappy job like I have been... Happiness doesnt always come from money. just gotta find what makes you happy




posted on May, 14 2011 @ 10:15 PM
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Thanks!

It's about time they released a new doc.



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by Rockdisjoint
 


Yes its a great one! Gerald Celente is a big part of it...

I love this man, I just wish I could get his trends journal locally... ENJOY EVERYONE!! Take the hour to watch it... its worth it

The NIA owner/founder is also on here alot... which I like how the founder just doesnt sit back and let everyone else do the work... digs in himself



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 10:24 PM
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I went to college for one semester after high school and quickly realized how much of a scam it was. This was back in 98. I can learn something 200x as fast on my own, especially in this day in age.

Watching the doc now. Thanks for posting.



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 10:37 PM
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The U.S. education system was designed to ease kids into working a full time job. A high school diploma doesn't mean you're smart it means you do what you're told. A college diploma means you have more knowledge than most, but more importantly you really do what you're told. That's all that corporations really care about.

College is for people who want to work their whole lives to die off on a $#!tty retirement fund, I had bigger dreams, so I dropped out of HS 3 years ago as a sophmore, learned to trade currencies and haven't looked back since. Now I'm doing very well for myself, and wouldn't change a thing. What the globalists and media don't want people to know is that learning to day trade is one of the easiest things to do. Instead they make it seem like you have to be a genius to be sucessful.

The real tragedy though is most people don't have enough faith in themselves to even consider or look into other options.
edit on 14-5-2011 by BlackStar99 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2011 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by BlackStar99
 


I don't agree with all of your opinions about being educated. I'm glad to hear you're doing well without attaining your high school diploma. I've built a very successful real estate investment business without a college education and feel many people could easily copy my business. I agree with what you said about people not having enough faith in themselves, I was like that at first.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 12:17 AM
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This video was amazing and I completely agree. A college degree really does not matter. I know someone who went to school for 4 years and got their psychology degree. They decided to not go for their masters degree because it costs so much money just for a piece of paper. Instead, they found a really great job in something completely different and is now making a good living, and they didn't even need a college degree for it.
People put way too much emphasis on getting a college degree these days and like the video said, there are so many people who don't even get a job in what they went to school for.

~Quyll
edit on 15-5-2011 by Quyll because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by Quyll
 


i agree completely. I am in college right now and if you look at the people that are in college most of the people there are just in it for the social lives. They don't actually care that much about studying. If they do care about studying they just want it to enter the work force. Most of these people don't realize that a college degree doesn't prove anything. It just proves that you can do whatever your professor tells you to do. If you want anything you'll have to get a masters degree or something.



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by BlackStar99
 


amen bro amen.. u hit the mark...people shud pay attention 2 wat u said...college useless...school useless...get a job...or start ur own business..make ur own life..live enjoy die content



posted on May, 15 2011 @ 01:16 PM
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I keep thinking about that poor lady, who continues to pay 25% of her total income on a 200,000$$ bill, which will never be paid off...

I woulda stopped paying that long ago. but thats just me



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 12:36 PM
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I am a relatively seasoned employee at a university.

I am also one of those who people routinely ask, "Where did you get your degree?" and are subsequently cold and distant when they discover that I did not get a degree. As a result I have no career potential here. Although my expertise and judgement gotten me invited to travel in the circles of CEO's and VP's, my organizational chain views me as some kind of 'upstart' who thinks he 'knows everything.'

I have had so many job offers in this place which ended in "Oh, we can't give you the job because you don't have a degree." Then I ask them casually what their degree is in, and it's most frequently something completely unrelated to what they do. Like a Federal Grants Manager (which is a financial auditing-type position) who's degree is in "Fine Art" or a Facilities Plant Director with a degree in "Medieval Dance." (OK... that last one was an exaggeration....)

I asked around once, "Why is a degree important?" and was told - in general terms - that ultimately it was about "Proving you could complete tasks and be responsible."

Then, I looked around at the students.... and I thought "Really? Is that what they are learning here?" which was followed up with, "Then why can't I find any degreed executives, administrators, or managers that ever seem to complete tasks or take responsibility for their decisions?"

When I got my Paralegal Certificate, (which is not a degree I am frequently reminded.) I recall spending a lot of time with young lawyers and such... all of who told me that you don't learn how to practice law in school; you learn that when you get into a firm. And then they would lament at the disillusionment of finding themselves doing boilerplate and cookie cutter tasks for the senior lawyers for years (until they could garner enough personal attention to get a chance to actually practice - usually requiring selfless devotion to the firm.... i.e "no life of your own.")

I found myself wondering how becoming a 'wage slave' has been sold to everyone as a 'goal.' Most of us acquiesce to the idea that we need to trade our time for money. (Yet the trade is always expressed as "you should be grateful for the job."; as if it were charity or something.) That aside from executive function, everything else is a matter of "doing as your told" and being available to "take the blame" for direction you were given and tried to execute in good faith.

Universities, I believe, may be at the heart of a social engineering conspiracy that creates inequity, engenders classism, reinforces the 'fiefdom' culture in corporate affairs, and feeds revenue streams to banks.... the leadership of Universities seems frequently to be about 'political relevance' and not 'talent' or 'devotion to education.'

Oddly, many of the most prominent and significant contributers to human thought, science, engineering, art, and even medicine came from people who today - could not get a job unless it was relatively menial.

Our leaders insist that High School diplomas mean nothing, that our country need to significantly increase it push to get everyone into college. To me it sounds like "We need more people to take vast loans, early in life."

Meanwhile smart, talented and otherwise capable people are marginalized in their potential, because they don't have the money, credit, or desire to jump through what many times are superfluous 'hoops' to get a piece of paper so they can earn more access to credit than others.

Education; especially public education, should be improved and expanded. But that doesn't seem like it's even in the plan, does it?



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


now this thread has become interesting...same view here...stop wasting time in institutions..get on the street and live and learn from life



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by BlackStar99
 


Blackstar,

I couldn't agree me more. The reason I say this is because I've fallen into the trap and can't presently get out. I, however, am lucky enough to have parents that are willing to loan me the money for school. I feel much better paying them a modest interest rate and keeping the money in the family rather than paying to some off-shore banksters.

Blackstar, may I ask how you got started in daytrading and what your recommendations would be for someone who wants to take a crack at it? I'm sure a lot of folks on this board would be interested in breaking out of the hours for dollars paradigm.

donuts



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by bagodonuts
reply to post by BlackStar99
 


Blackstar,

I couldn't agree me more. The reason I say this is because I've fallen into the trap and can't presently get out. I, however, am lucky enough to have parents that are willing to loan me the money for school. I feel much better paying them a modest interest rate and keeping the money in the family rather than paying to some off-shore banksters.

Blackstar, may I ask how you got started in daytrading and what your recommendations would be for someone who wants to take a crack at it? I'm sure a lot of folks on this board would be interested in breaking out of the hours for dollars paradigm.

donuts



Of course. I'm always open to mentoring people, so if anybodies interested let me know. To start go here(babypips.com/school) and finish the school. It's probably the best resource online for learning forex(foreign exchange) as well as forums like this that are specifically for forex trading. After you finish, I'll give you the specific system I use to trade that nets me 20-30% a day. I mean I could just give everyone the system, but I think you'll be much happier understanding all the fundamentals first.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 06:59 PM
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Originally posted by atsmem1980
reply to post by Maxmars
 


now this thread has become interesting...same view here...stop wasting time in institutions..get on the street and live and learn from life


I don't disagree with your statement, but there are some fields that you cannot learn from the street alone.

Case in point, my field, Aerospace Structural Engineering, the minimum entry diploma will be Mechanical Engineering, if you get very specialized (let say composite material), then a Master Degree could be handy.

If I'm looking to hired 2 Engineers and I received 122 Curriculum Vitae, my first sort will be to discard anyone without a completed diploma (in fact the H.R. department will do that first sort), then look at previous experience in that field (if I'm looking for a junior Engineer, therefore no experience, maybe special project, summer job, hobbies, other things).

I'm toward the end of my career right now, I have seen lot of people, some with completed diploma and some without, and most of the time (not always) you can clearly see the difference in career path (at least in the highly technical field, core Engineering, rather than Management or administration of any kind).

But my Engineering education was done long time ago (35 years, in Canada, at that time, it didn't cost that much and it was partially paid by my employer), maybe today (in USA, with the student loan system over there) it is a different story, maybe that documentary is right after all.

One thing that strike me, is the fact that the burden is absorbed by the US government, so when those student loans couldn't be paid back, it will be forgotten (bailed-out) and pass to all tax-payer to pay. Another transfer of money to a selected few (teachers, students & University administration/building creation) instead of having contracted a loan thru a bank (which will probably never bailed you out).

Interesting documentary anyway.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by PopeyeFAFL
 




I don't disagree with your statement, but there are some fields that you cannot learn from the street alone.


There's nothing you can't teach yourself using the internet.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by BlackStar99
 


Thanks Blackstar, that's a generous offer. I'm in between semesters right now, so I'm going to study up on this.

Now see, this is why I love ATS. A true community of open-minded, good-willed(except for the paid trolls), intelligent individuals. I've been lurking for a long time, now thinking I should have joined much earlier.

donuts



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 07:49 PM
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I think one of the main problems surrounding this issue today is that the traditional notion of a college education has been has been hijacked. Historically, university was intended to be an experience through which a person would develop essential critical reasoning skills through a broad based education that included the arts and sciences. Writing, speaking, and critical thinking was emphasized. For the majority of students today, college is considered a 5 yr. job training program, not an education.

Scientific studies show that true learning and critical thinking engages a different part of the brain than does any training for a specific task. Any monkey or dog can be trained. It is our ability to reason on a higher level and formulate questions that separates us from the animals.

While I believe that college is necessary for the "hard" sciences(math, engineering, physics, etc.), it should not by any means be a prerequisite to even be able to submit an application for a job. The standard corporate response of "it demonstrates that a person can start and finish something" is hackneyed and tired.

donuts
edit on 16-5-2011 by bagodonuts because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 08:23 PM
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Originally posted by PopeyeFAFL

Originally posted by atsmem1980
reply to post by Maxmars
 


now this thread has become interesting...same view here...stop wasting time in institutions..get on the street and live and learn from life


I don't disagree with your statement, but there are some fields that you cannot learn from the street alone.


I agree. Specialized skills and fields require special training and that has a value.

I just don't think its entirely honest to industrialize higher education as it has been; because we have people who are demonstrably capable having their potential repressed because of reasons that don't align themselves with the common good.

If "any" degree will do, "No degree" should do just as well.

The institution is making it imperative to get a degree, but not to increase the quality of the citizenry and thus civilization; instead, it sole effective purpose is to generate a revenue stream by way of debt.



posted on May, 16 2011 @ 09:12 PM
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Originally posted by BlackStar99

reply to post by PopeyeFAFL
 




I don't disagree with your statement, but there are some fields that you cannot learn from the street alone.


There's nothing you can't teach yourself using the internet.



If it was true (it is, but only partially, up to a certain point, and even then, some knowledge will be very shallow, not really mastered), this will imply that as soon as someone can read, you could park him/her in front of a series of documentaries, tutorial, in order to learn anything and everything in live.

We all know (I least I do) that human learning does not work like that, some connection to a meaningful other is often necessary.

Some subjects could potentially be mastered using the Internet, but not everything (certainly not without someone assessing the progress, giving adequate challenge, etc.).



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