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Theory - How the Ancient Pyrimids were built

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posted on May, 3 2011 @ 08:19 AM
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After reading an Awsome thread, obviously constructed with lots of work and effort, by Slayer69 How they Built the Great Pyramid of Egypt, there still seemed to be some speculation as to "How" the Ancient Pyrimds were actually built.
Anyone interested in the subject MUST read his thread as it is a wealth of knowledge, easily readable, and is straight to the point. Thanks Slayer!
After explaining many theories and different methods, somehow a crucial method that may have actually been used, and in all fairness, makes complete sense, may have been overlooked...

Whilst doing some research on the Ancient City of Machu Picchu, I stumbled accross a snippet of info within a National Geographic doco that really sunk in for me.

The Method Involves useing what are called "Sleepers". A modern day usage of these is the concrete base on railway tracks, but during the construction of the Pyrimids they would have been made from rounded strong logs, to reduce the weight so it was movable and friction. Its all basically summed up in the snippet that I've willingly cut out of a 45min Documentry.



So these "Ladders" would have eventually been made so that every forward thrust would result in the top ladder aligning slightly further ahead of the fixed bottom ladder, and since the bottom ladders rungs overhang the top ladder, half the workers would hold the position, whilst the upper half would ascend to the next rung, having the bottom half ascend on the next pause. This method could have easily lifted rocks over a tonne, with fewer workers than dragging and lifting. Leverage is the key to this riddle!

Now I'm no Egyptologist, or any kind of "ist", but common sense is shining on this one!

What ya think ATS?


edit on 3-5-2011 by grindhouzer because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 3 2011 @ 08:55 AM
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Not likely.. The weight of most of the blocks used in the pyramids would have required massive "ladders" to support such weights. Just doesn't seem plausible in my opinion.



posted on May, 3 2011 @ 09:08 AM
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Yeah, i think they used telekenisis...



posted on May, 3 2011 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by iksose7
 


Want to explain in a bit more detail there buddy?



posted on May, 3 2011 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by imawlinn
 


Or smaller lighter ones, with evenly spaced runs to distribute the weight down the fixed ladder into the ground, a similiar concept is seen when you lie on a bed of nails, also I think the angle of the outside walls of the pyrimids may hav significance to support this theory.



posted on May, 3 2011 @ 11:15 AM
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A few years ago, I stumbled upon this article about Coral Castle, such an amazing place! Anyway, the builder of Coral Castle claimed he knew the secret of the Egyptian builders. Edward Leedskalnin has now passed on, but he devised a method to single handedly maneuver 30 ton coral blocks.

On average, the weight of a single block used in the Coral Castle was greater than those used to build the Great Pyramid. He labored for 28 years to complete the work, which consisted of a total of 1,100 tons of rock. ...
For his miracles of construction engineering, Leedskalnin received attention not only from engineers and technologists, but from the U.S. government, who paid him a visit hoping to be enlightened. ...

The article goes on and it's a very interesting read. The concept is that Leedskalnin used magnets to levetate the stones and move them. Remember, this man had no help, he built Coral Castle alone!
The author of the article visited Coral Castle and saw Leedskalnin's workshop. He had gotten himself a magnet and tested it on the equipment found in the workshop.. The author's hypothesis proved to be truw. The equipment flywheels etc, responded to the magnet.

Some people say magnetism, some people say harmonic resonance and yet others say the Egyptians chose to build the pyramids in the most difficult way that is imaginable. Here are a few examples of Egypt's amazing technology:

The Dendera Lightbulb

Accurate Ariel Maps

Helicopters and flying vehicles


There's more if you look, but the point is if these people even had an accurate understanding of the solar system, do you honestly believe they used ramps to build these mega-structures?

I kinda lean toward the magnet theory myself...



posted on May, 3 2011 @ 07:42 PM
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reply to post by Invariance
 


Very Interesting theory!

However, it has now opened up a whole new avenue of questions, that seem unanswered, and have now been taken to the grave!!

Would like to know more about this!



posted on May, 4 2011 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by grindhouzer
The Method Involves useing what are called "Sleepers". A modern day usage of these is the concrete base on railway tracks, but during the construction of the Pyrimids they would have been made from rounded strong logs, to reduce the weight so it was movable and friction. Its all basically summed up in the snippet that I've willingly cut out of a 45min Documentry.


It was done by boat and by sled. The limestone quarries were close and the workers' village has burials of the overseers as well as a lot of 'receipts' (ostrika) showing stone being received. There are drawings of them moving large statues and so forth.

Egypt doesn't have a lot of hardwood. Palm wood is very soft and crushable; they paid a lot to get hard woods to Egypt for their finest furniture and so forth.

Pinned to the top of the forum are a lot of internet resources (including free online books by some of the early Egyptologists. You might like reading those.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 05:47 AM
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reply to post by grindhouzer
 


Remember, the heaviest of these blocks weighed from 25-80 tonnes. And it is estimated that 800 hundreds tonnes of stone blocks had to be hauled a day. I don't think these ladders could take all this weight.



posted on May, 6 2011 @ 05:56 AM
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Basic understanding in physics and levers and pulleys and whatnot, it's well within reach of it's time of engineering.




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