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So much water in the Mississippi river... tributaries water flow going BACKWARDS...

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posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 04:55 PM
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Uh oh?

All Eyes on the Mississippi River

The Mississippi River continues to rise, so much so that its tributaries are starting to flow backwards. At Tom Lee Park, preps for Memphis in May continue knowing that the worst is still yet to come.

It's a site not often seen; the Wolf River and Nonconnah Creek are flowing backwards. The swelling river cannot take on much more water.

Gene Rench with the National Weather Service said all eyes are on the Mississippi. The tributaries flowing backwards are a big problem for the adjacent communities.

"Right now the Mississippi river is in the process of going through what we call an epic flood, meaning it's more than historic, it's more than a 100 year flood, it's more like a 500 year flood," he said. "We could flood many homes, businesses, close down factories, people could drown."

The river is more than two feet past flood stage; it rose two feet in the 24 hours following the storms. It's expected to crest at 45 feet around May 10th, right when Barbecue Festival teams are setting up their tents.

Crazy.


The Army Corps of Engineers is trying to out smart it by shutting down the Tennessee River and closing all other tributaries and dams that feed into the Mississippi.

According to Rench, "we're hoping and praying that the plans and actions that the Corp has taken, this strategy is going to work."

Hopefully it works...
edit on 30-4-2011 by Vitchilo because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:02 PM
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could be some pretty bad flooding if their plan doesn't work out...best of wishes that it does



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:06 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 



We are witnessing history here.

It seem very apparent from the articles I have seen today that they are taking a gamble with this either way. Having to weigh the possibilities (pro's/cons). The disaster part is obviously imminent and anyone in the risk area should consider heading to safer ground until this passes.

My thoughts are will all of you living in these areas. Peace...



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:12 PM
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This is what you get for building communities in a major river's flood zones. But you gotta love the taxpayer paid federal flood insurance that helps these people continue to live there. A free house every couple years courtesy of the U.S. taxpayer? Hell yeah!



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Ferris.Bueller.II
 


Goes to show you really don't understand the programs and how they work. However it seems every flood is worse than the last one. First it was record flood. Then 100 year flood. Now epic flood. If this continues its going to be like the tower of babel. The only place you can live is in one spot on top of each other.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:28 PM
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New Madrid Seismic Zone

You think this type of thing might be related to what's going on out there at all?




In the New Madrid region, the earthquakes dramatically affected the landscape. They caused bank failures along the Mississippi River, landslides along Chickasaw Bluffs in Kentucky and Tennessee, and uplift and subsidence of large tracts of land in the Mississippi River floodplain. One such uplift related to faulting near New Madrid, Missouri, temporarily forced the Mississippi River to flow backwards. In addition, the earthquakes liquefied subsurface sediment over a large area and at great distances resulting in ground fissuring and violent venting of water and sediment. One account of this phenomena stated that the Pemiscot Bayou "blew up for a distance of nearly fifty miles."



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:31 PM
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It strikes me as gearing up for the New Madrid. If these storms that are causing all this flooding and tornados aren't natural and the fault line goes, what better way to set the people up for a 1-2 punch.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Not familiar with that old saying, "Water seeks its own leve?"

That means too much water in one place goes to another place.

This is not some strange phenomena. This is what flooding is...the definition of the word!!



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by Vitchilo
 


Dont we see rivers flowing backwards after or before an earth quake? Could it be related? I think New Madras is about to go.

www.showme.net...

We really do not know if it began running backwards preceding the last great quake, but who knows? Just putting it out there.
edit on 30-4-2011 by antar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by redrose123
 



Goes to show you really don't understand the programs and how they work.


What's not to understand?

National Flood Insurance Program


The NFIP is meant to be self-supporting, though in 2004 Congress found that repetitive-loss properties cost the taxpayer about $200 million annually.

As critics predicted, the NFIP encouraged people to locate in areas more susceptible to flood damage. Prior to the NFIP's existence, insurance coverage for flood losses was not provided by any private insurance carriers. Insurance losses stemming from flood damage were largely the responsibility of the property owner, although the consequences were sometimes mitigated through provisions for disaster aid. Today, owners of property in flood plains frequently receive disaster aid and payment for insured losses, which in many ways negates the original intent of the NFIP. Consequently, these policy decisions have escalated losses stemming from floods in recent years, both in terms of property and life.

Moreover, certain provisions within the NFIP increase the likelihood that flood-prone properties will be occupied by the people least likely to be in a position to recover from flood disasters, which further increases demand for aid.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:46 PM
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I'm in south central louisiana and our channels are flooded even though we haven't had rain.... it's all gotta go somewhere, and now it's coming here.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:48 PM
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Most of the USA had their fair share of snow this past winter. It was predictable as soon as january.

flood in the mid + Fire in south = not cool



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 05:53 PM
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If the New Madrid goes while all this flooding is taking place, it will be absolutely devastating. I lived in a river town during the flood of 1993 and it's hard to imagine much worse devastation. Even the small town I live in now, is flooding regularly and we are 20 minutes from the river. We are cleaning up from a sump pump failure on Friday. We have had no rain for a couple of days, but the ground is so saturated , there is no where for the water to go. And the rain just keeps coming. Not to mention the tornadoes, hail, etc.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Under Water
 


The one you gotta watch is the Red River.
If that one starts to rise along with the Mississippi, then Louisiana is big trouble.

Having said that, Atchafalaya Basin is Custer's Last Stand, so to speak, so keep an eye on the Northern levees there.
Epic flooding of the Missisip & Red would create catastrophic flooding of the Atchafalaya and would essentially wipe out the entire central portion of Louisiana--from Alexandria in Rapides Parish to Houma in Terrebonne Parish.




That's a lot of people wiped out, which would include half my family.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 06:23 PM
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Originally posted by Ferris.Bueller.II
This is what you get for building communities in a major river's flood zones. But you gotta love the taxpayer paid federal flood insurance that helps these people continue to live there. A free house every couple years courtesy of the U.S. taxpayer? Hell yeah!


Yeah!
Thanks a lot civilization of mankind who has lived and built communities along waterways for all of known history!!
And thanks a lot generations of families who were born there and made a life with the rest of their kinfolk because that's all they've ever known and probably couldn't afford, nor have the resources to just pack up everything and move to another area of the country to get blasted away by tornadoes, devastated by earthquakes, or whatever other natural catastrophes await due to nature and the ever-changing natural landscape.

Way to burden your fellow taxpayer, since no matter where you move in the U.S. you'll be paying taxes along with the rest of us. Hellz yeah! Woo hoo!!!!
edit on 30-4-2011 by stupid girl because: dumb spelling error



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:00 PM
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it's already gettin bad in memphis.


Put-Put Golf literally Underwater

Whats the deal with them bout to blow up the levee systems???



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by ButterCookie
 


Not sure of the levee systems you're referring to, but it is not unheard of to blow levees that would allow water run-off into uninhabited areas as a last resort.



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:20 PM
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I cannot check sources, because I'm at work. But I heard from a lady that has friends down in Cairo,Il that they are expriencing "Sandboils" , Which I am to understand has something to do with presure with the levee, and on the other side of the presure the sand from the levee boils, Due to the presure.

People in the area are very concerned.


Sorry for spelling. Bad light. not suppose to be on computer.
edit on 30-4-2011 by crappiekat because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:39 PM
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The Corp of Engineers has been catching a lot of heat because they have been wanting to blast the levee near Cairo, IL. They haven't officially decided to do so yet, however, the city of Cairo is under a mandatory evacuation order by 12:00 a.m. Sunday. If I remember correctly, I read that the Missouri side of the river was evacuated yesterday. The Missouri National Guard was brought in to assist in that effort as there was much opposition to the levee being blasted by Missourians.http:www.kfvs12.com



posted on Apr, 30 2011 @ 07:45 PM
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FLOOD WARNING:

All Shelby County residents should take flood precautions NOW and be prepared to leave homes and businesses
www.wmctv.com...

edit on 30-4-2011 by ButterCookie because: (no reason given)



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