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The German-American Tadpole Blimp Re-Emerges on the Way to Army Flight Testing

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posted on Apr, 23 2011 @ 01:28 PM
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The tadpole-shaped airship formerly known as STS-111, currently known as Argus One, and commonly referred to as the sperm blimp, has completed initial flight tests and is on its way to the U.S. Army’s Yuma proving ground to undergo military testing.

The drone dirigible’s segmented design, crafted by Germany’s TAO Technologies, is aimed at resisting the push, pull, and twist of air currents. It also boasts a unique “Fuelgas” system that runs the blimp’s engines on a fuel mixture with the same density as atmospheric air, keeping the aircraft’s buoyancy the same as it burns off its fuel supply (this trick is actually not new, but was devised in the 1930s during the golden age of airships).

Tested in Germany in 2009, the STS-111/Argus One system is intended for deployment as a surveillance and communications relay drone, but the company (companies?) behind it haven’t been exactly on the up and up. Several name changes, deals, and at least one SEC probe have kept the blimp off the radar for going on two years now.

But one $300,000 civil penalty later, the Argus One appears back on track. Army testing will commence this summer, barring anymore unforeseen setbacks, an extension of the military's ongoing love affair with airships. Video of a 2008 prototype test is below.


POPSCI - Full Article

I see articles like this, and I think "Oh lord! here we go with a bunch of new ATS UFO Sighting threads"


Although on a more serious note and in relation to the article, there was one section that did sort of stand out to me:



is intended for deployment as a surveillance and communications relay drone, but the company (companies?) behind it haven’t been exactly on the up and up. Several name changes, deals, and at least one SEC probe have kept the blimp off the radar for going on two years now.


It's sections and tid-bits in articles like these that get my imagination wheels churning. I begin to imagine all the possible scenarios that this specific technology could be used for both good and bad. However, to devote the time to listing all of those in the OP would (I feel) take away from the article itself. None the less, the info is yours for the reading.




posted on Apr, 23 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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I watch the show Fringe and in the alternate universe they still use passenger-carrying blimps for regular air travel... is the Hindenburg disaster the only reason we stopped using them for air travel?

Very cool post imho



posted on Apr, 23 2011 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by Blisse
 


Thanks, you know, I don't know...perhaps the Hindenburg did account for some of the reason why you don't see them except for over sporting events. Of course, it's a good thing we didn't let the Titanic tragedy scare us as easily...else where would we be as far as cruises ships go? Only risk as of late on a cruise ship is that virus that people always get...Norwalk I think it is....dirty dirty cruise ships.



posted on Apr, 24 2011 @ 06:43 PM
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Reminds me of hyper blimp.
www.youtube.com...

or the Salt Lake blimp uav siting

www.youtube.com...



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