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No time..must leave...one bag..what would you like to be in it.

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posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:20 AM
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1. Swiss Army Knife
2. Pot Vaseline
3. 2 Liter Vodka
4. As much weed as possible
5. Girlfriend
6. Good Mood
7. Nice Weather and about 20°c.
8. Thats enough.

Just Joking, I have no girlfriend




posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:27 AM
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I think a lot of people keep their stuff in a backpack or something similar. I have a backpack with some stuff, but also keep a lot of stuff in a 5-gallon bucket, which you can get at a grocery store in the bakery department (frosting comes in them) for a dollar or two or sometimes even free. They are waterproof so you don't have to worry about keeping your stuff dry. You can dump the stuff out, and you have the bucket to use for carrying water or whatever. You can also use it as something to sit on. A totally handy container.

I think the best place to keep your kit is in the car, which is normally parked right next to the house. If you need to get away, you are more than likely going to take your car. if for some reason you are going on foot, then you know right where your kit is - in the car where you can just grab it as you walk by the car.

Also, it is nice to have your kit ready, but you should have your location picked out ahead of time and know how to get there. Don't just look on a map and pick a spot that looks good, you need to go and check out the area.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:30 AM
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Small box of OB Tampons. These are awesome fire starter material and the OB brand has no "applicator" - just the tampon itself. Very lightweight and compact, sealed in cello so they will stay dry and combustible.

I also was thinking about a couple of plastic shower curtains - light weight ones from Wal-Mart type store and already have "rings" for handy attachment to each other or rope on a tree etc. Small compact packaging.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:43 AM
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reply to post by mappam
 


I carry a tarp but I also have a shower curtain as a back up.
I am glad someone else thought of it as well.
Funny thing is one of my last trips I really could have used it but its been there so long that I forgot I had it til I got home.
I had to sleep in snowy weather with the bottom half of my body getting snowed on.
If only I remembered my back up I wouldn't have woken up covered in snow.
Shower curtain is a great idea to have with you even if it is just a ground sheet.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 08:57 AM
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I would think I would add onto these lists, some climate related items. If you live in a cold climate and it's winter, I would add
Thermal socks
Thermal underwear
Gloves
Hat/or face mask hoodie hat
Most of those items can be purchased relatively cheap and kept in with your gear seperate from your normal everyday winter gear.
edit on 22-3-2011 by mugger because: sp.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 09:11 AM
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one Gallon a day is min water.
need a water filter.
Map of route that is not main highways.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 09:37 AM
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I am really glad with all the response to this thread. Some people have reaally thought it out and contributed some good handy stuff to my list. The tampons, the 5 gallonbucket, gloves, the shower curtain...(this person probably sat down and took it very serious0 and not to forget the coffe filters. I am not sure what purpose other than filtering water, and coffee ofcourse.

I can imagine that the United States demand a more extensive Bag to Go than one in a country as The Netherlands. But maybe I am wrong about that because keeping your head up from drowning is in every pool the same I guess.

I noticed that some people prepare to the max....

Most of the people in Holland live below sea-level. Although in many cities it is hard to imagine that a 100 ft wave can take all these cities out, it can happen if nature goes wild. Maybe it would be a good idea for people living near the coast to pack diving equipment or to store it in reach. Some scuba gear maybe.....? To complete the paranoia....what if the air from the atmosphere is blown away for some 3 minutes....or more likely........biochemical exposure.

Did any of you prepared for that?



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 10:00 AM
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im very surprised that hardly anyone has mentioned taking seeds, they're vital and very very light and in the long run will definatly save your life.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 10:42 AM
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A pair of good, sturdy, leather work gloves



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by Jepic
 


Ah yes my man.
I'll take 2 please.
If you can't have that then what's the use in surviving.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 11:16 AM
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The stuff marked with an asterisk is stuff I wish I had in my bag, the unstarred items are stuff I already have:

6 high-calorie energy bars (Peanut butter and chocolate flavor)
6 Emergen-C packets
3 ramen
2 Spaghettios with meatballs*
2 packets of instant breakfast drink and a packet of dry milk
Plastic spork
1 gallon of water
4 sandwich baggies & 4 50 gallon lawn bags (work for water storage, rain ponchos, cell phone protectors, tarps, etc.)
Three days' worth of feminine hygiene products
Multi-tool
Two separate packages of waterproof matches
Bic lighter
Change of socks and underpants
Compact LED flashlight
Batteries
Spiral notebook (paper is useful for many things, such as writing, and starting fires; I could also foresee the wire in it being useful as well)
Mini sewing kit with scissors, safety pins
Thermal shirt
Mid-range compact first aid kit (self-constructed)
De-tubed roll of toilet paper
Bar of soap
Rope (want to replace with para cord)
Teeny tiny christopagan altar
Bottle of Bactine*
handgun and extra ammo*

If I had time, I would grab the peanut butter out of the refrigerator. I've had a few experiences where I had to hit the road and rough it for a few days, and PB is, in my experience, quite a good source of energy as well as a comfort food.

All of the stuff in there that is water-killable, such as the flashlight, notebook, first aid, tp, etc., are in baggies of varying sizes, which further provides me with more baggies if I find like good water or something. I have about half of that excluding the large items (and smaller items in smaller quantities) in my big ole purse as part of my get home bag. Part of me wants to say the purse fits with the backpack and I could eliminate some of the items in the backpack...but redundancy for the win.

My bag is tested; it's the configuration I used on an involuntary 70 mile bicycle trip with no money, and it kept me alive easily, despite various things going wrong with my bike, campfire burns on my thumb, and a badly scraped leg.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 11:30 AM
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Gin
Whiskey
Rum
Matches/lighter so i can smoke my cigarettes
playboy mag
a big bag of powder for those lonly nights.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 11:56 AM
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Can opener, matches, lighter, fishing string and hooks, knife, sheet, shower curtain, pot, water jug, beef jerky, peanut butter, crackers, change of clothes, extra socks, small canned stuff (i.e. vienna sausage, potted meat, tuna, etc.) extra pair of shoes, blanket, map or atlas.

I think that should cover it for the most part.... I already live in the woods so I would not leave so quickly... but preparation puts me a step ahead...



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 11:59 AM
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This post has been covered repeatedly. Do some research. I am really amazed at the ignorance posted here. How far do some of you plan on travelling? Do you really carry all that stuff everywhere? Can you grab it right now and go out the door? While you are at work? Visiting friends? Shopping at the mall? If it really hit the fan who are you going to signal? Why do you need a map? Don't you know where you are going? Why not? Do you have place to go and a plan to get there? Don't even think you will live in the woods, it ain't gonna happen. Do you really think the residents of the countryside are going to allow your invasion? Trust me they are better prepared and better shots.

on my belt right now
1. multitool
2.duct tape wrapped around old gift card
3.lighter
4.pocket flashlight
5. firesteel

in my pocket right now
4" folder
4" crescent wrenh
pen
pocket flashlight
flash drive /sd card reader

6X9 bag beside me now
paracord
spork
duct tape
waterbag by platypus
55 gal garbage bags X2
space blanket
snare wire
pocket chainsaw
lockpick set
fishing kit
fire kit
spare batteries
magnifying glass
sewing kit

Think this through. are you really prepared or just collecting kit? Can you carry everything injured? Can you move quickly and quietly? Can you go more than a few miles? Learn to make do with less. Cooking in an old can. Two liter bottle for water. plastic for shelter. Do you dress for the worst no matter what. What boots are you wearing right now? Can you defend your self right now. Can you get to where you are going with less? Does everone else see your stuff? Can you use what you have in the worst of conditions?

Most here are not prepared they are just refugees with a lot of stuff, most of which will be left behind, lost or taken away.
The best tool to have is knowledge and experience, GET IT NOW!!

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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All these people packing toilet paper are making me lol.

I was forced to spend a few months in the Utah wilderness for being an unruly teen. I had to go without toilet paper or a tent, the inside of tree bark is surprisingly soft if you bend it back and forth a few times.. also smooth stones work too.. and sprigs from trees.

You get over not having TP pretty quickly, and it's not that bad at all. Besides it takes up too much room when you can put more important things in your pack.

Unless you have your wife/girlfriend/daughter/sister/female friend with you then you better bring some TP or they will be irate.

1. Book on plants and their uses for your country/region
2. Hunting knife
3. Heavy Duty Tarp
4. Pack cord
5. Bow-drill set/lighter/flint and steel
6. Zero degree sleeping bag for anywhere not near the equator

edit on 3/22/2011 by Drezden because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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leave with my girlfriend



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 12:37 PM
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Not sure about you but I just had a major failure.

I checked and loaded all my stuff into my BOB and now I'm thinking to go with back pack version.

This is a bag I plan on having at my side at all times.

Loaded all my gear into it and I was like holy crap way too heavy for the non domanant hande to carry. It works don't get me wrong. But is extremely heavy if you catch my drift.

I think my heavy load stuff. Will need to be in a back pack. I know some weight will be removed and strapped to my exterior but that also leaves alot of weight in the bag still.


I need a bag which can support at a min 50lbs and is very durable heavy canvase type to withstand heavy metal pushing at the bottom.

I would hate to be running in the woods with one hand on the BOB or have the bag break open at the bottom.


I went over and over it again and again. Today I'm shopping at a Military surplus right down the road in New Hampshire.

I'll let you know how I made out.

I have 2 thick layered body style bag huge like a hockey players bag. This is for clothes, bedding and blankets big heavy tarps ax e-tool hand op water pump really don't plan on bugging out but staying put in the home and living off the land.

If for some reason I need to evac from the home front. I need to better package my heavy gear to be more mobile.

I have cold weather gear -50 sleeping bags 2 king air mattresses House like tent with heavy duty tarp for added proctection from the elements.

I have 6 packs of thermal blankets gort at the store on clearance in spring for 2 bucks each. lol I know I bought the type with bubbles to use as unsulation inside the tent they fit pretty good and stay up well with duct tape.
Bottle of original cloroxe for water.

Did I foget anything.

I have alot of food and would hate to have to bug out but if I have to I may need a bigger truck for the four wheeler and the gear.



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 12:45 PM
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The most important thing to have is knowledge and the will to survive.
practical application in the art of survival is paramount, so it doesn't matter what you have in that bag? if you don't know how to use it or survive without it? it really wont matter because you will quickly lose the will to survive over boredom and being uncomfortable in your sleeping arrangements and quality of food, if you haven't seasoned yourself and set your mind in survival mode......PRIOR

Here is a test.... take a small pocket knife, a tarp, and a camel back full of fresh water, and go into the woods for 5 days, with no other gear and survive by your instincts and ingenuity. if you can't pull off 5 days, plan on taking a lead pill when the SHTF and place mercy on yourself, because no one will come to your rescue



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by agentblue

I leave my cell phone at home bc everybody that knows me knows what frequency i run on my portable cb radio and cb's can't be triangulated like a ham radio or a cell phone. I have a solar charger for my batteries. because: (no reason given)


ANY radio can be triangulated, depending on how bad they want to catch you.
CBs transmit much weaker than ham units (but use much less electricity). climbing up a hill and calling/listening (once or twice a day in long-term situation) is a good practice.
technically only a certified Amateur Radio Operator can legally operate a ham radio, but in an emergency situtation anything goes, radio-wise. emergency traffic always has priority.

I would encourage anyone interested in emergency preparation to consider getting your ham license. basic operators can use hand-held units as well as house/base and mobile/vehicle units. most countys have emergency operators under the RACES and ARES programs. www.ares.org...

I think I'll get two bags together; once for short-notice a few days, another for long-term mega-disasters (with the possibility of never returning 'home').
in the event of short-term events (storms) a list of credit card numbers/contacts and bank account info might not be a bad idea.

edit on 22-3-2011 by works4dhs because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-3-2011 by works4dhs because: typo



posted on Mar, 22 2011 @ 01:36 PM
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Originally posted by anumohi
The most important thing to have is knowledge and the will to survive.
practical application in the art of survival is paramount, so it doesn't matter what you have in that bag? if you don't know how to use it or survive without it? it really wont matter because you will quickly lose the will to survive over boredom and being uncomfortable in your sleeping arrangements and quality of food, if you haven't seasoned yourself and set your mind in survival mode......PRIOR

Here is a test.... take a small pocket knife, a tarp, and a camel back full of fresh water, and go into the woods for 5 days, with no other gear and survive by your instincts and ingenuity. if you can't pull off 5 days, plan on taking a lead pill when the SHTF and place mercy on yourself, because no one will come to your rescue


I do not completely agree with your vision on survival for the unexperianced....It depends also what you try to survive and for how long. I opened this thread with surviving a disaster for a few days...maybe a week before help will arrive or help can be found. It is not the intension that with survival thread is meant to stay in the woods or whereever forever.

You and an other commenter in this thread have an other kind of survival in mind. The extended stay survival kind I guess. Even then....if you are unexperianced it will give you a chance to think the days to come without being forced to eat your pet for dinner. Life will not get easier but it might give these people a chance to find some like you to teach them how to survive and to take care of themselves.



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