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Alein plants

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posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:08 PM
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Im kinda new here and was not much of a lurker before i joined. Through my reading here i have seen many members that have been abducted and or have been in contact with one or more alien species. I was wondering if i could get input from any of these people. I have heard many different ancient astronaut theories but i was wondering if anyone knew if there are any plants that are in fact alien plants from another planted/dimension. I was also wondering if anyone thinks it is possible that Some ETs might be hyper evolved plants. I know we humans tend to only think animals have IQ points but that is only how it happened here.




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:22 PM
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Plants and Trees are the original Inhabitants of this Planet according to me, so I would say that we all are aliens and in our own planets we might be having some trees or plants but at least from some of my visions of my past I do not remember seeing any trees or plants or anything similar for that matter....



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Darkk
 





I have heard many different ancient astronaut theories but i was wondering if anyone knew if there are any plants that are in fact alien plants from another planted/dimension.


I'm pretty sure if there was off world life, plant or otherwise, it would be all over the papers my friend. We're constantly finding life on earth in places we never thought possible, so even if tomorrow someone finds one they think is alien eventually they'll show it's from here, like the rest.

And just to ask, what makes you think any life, alien beings, plant, microbes, could survive in our atmosphere? If they evolved off earth under different circumstances, there's no reason to believe they could survive here.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:25 PM
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reply to post by Darkk
 


There's a great grown-up short story by Roald Dahl titled: 'The Sound Machine'.
It's about a scientist who invents a machine that can hear plants screaming when damaged...
...great and slightly unnerving tale that really makes one wonder...!


Here's a poem about some trees screaming, seeing as that seems to be the limit of my knowledge about sentient plants.



I Heard the Pine Trees Screaming

I heard the pine trees screaming,
unmistakable, mournful and shrill.
The roar of the saws was awful,
and I prayed for the trees they’d kill.

The calm of the morning was shattered,
as chaos filled the air.
Across the pond in the distance
was a scene of total despair.

The monstrous trucks and machinery,
had moved in under cover of dark,
Now springing forth into action,
methodically assaulting their mark.

One by one the trees they grabbed,
with huge mechanical claws.
Then severed and ripped from where they stood
with slashing and tearing of saws.

None of the trees escaped the attack,
all of them, the large and the small.
Either harvested or horribly damaged,
till nothing was left at all!

The hillside now chaotically ragged,
a victim of the clear cutting saw
Lies naked and totally abandoned,
a vista so horribly raw.

The trees now gone, no longer a home,
all fauna evicted or killed.
No burrow was left or perch for the owl,
their homes no way to rebuild.

No more the trees to sigh their song,
as the breeze plays softly on their limbs,
And swaying gently in the wind
with sounds heard lovely as hymns.

No more can we listen and walk and talk,
so peacefully in that majestic old wood.
Nor even be able to find our path
made ugly where beauty once stood.

Perhaps in time, half century or so,
when we’re on to eternal dreaming,
The wood will be back for others to love
and I’ll not hear the pine trees screaming.


Bruce Bigelow

Other than that, I'm at a loss I'm afraid, sorry.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:32 PM
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Not always, there are a few movies even with the idea of a plant alien. Little Shop of Horrors, or any of the pod people movies, Invasion of the Body Snatchers.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:33 PM
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I'll bet there are alien spores on some meteorites that crash land here and grow from the soil. How would we really know for sure? There are so many types of plant life still being discovered, above and below the oceans, how do we really know if they are indigenous to Earth?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:35 PM
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Salvia divinorum is thought to be an alien plant... The Mythology surrounding it also is interesting... A Gift from the "God(s)" supposedly? hrmm...



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:40 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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Aloe Vera?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
reply to post by Darkk
 



And just to ask, what makes you think any life, alien beings, plant, microbes, could survive in our atmosphere? If they evolved off earth under different circumstances, there's no reason to believe they could survive here.


Same reason Tardigrades can survive in space
edit on 16-3-2011 by Darkk because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:47 PM
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If you look up the history of marijuana there is no trace to its origin only traces of when it became abundant a lot of people believe that marijuana is THE ALIEN PLANT.




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by Darkk
 


Listen friend, you posted a question I answered it, and it's valid, if we had proof of an off world plant you'd darn well know about it, so no, they aren't here as of yet.

And if they do find one they think is alien, like other forms of life, it will be tested and shown to be native to this earth.

Anyways, we have something here called DECORUM and you'd best refresh yourself on the T&C because ATS is not the place for people to whine and cry and call people names when they disagree. Heck i wasn't even disagreeing with you at all. But that's fine, going from your half baked remarks in other threads I see what's up.

Post count? Whatever buddy grow up, discuss the thread topic or be gone


edit on 16-3-2011 by phishyblankwaters because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by Darkk
 



Tardigrade


The most convenient place to find tardigrades is on lichens and mosses. Other environments are dunes, beaches, soil, and marine or freshwater sediments, where they may occur quite frequently (up to 25,000 animals per litre). Tardigrades often can be found by soaking a piece of moss in spring water.[4] Tardigrades are able to survive in extreme environments that would kill almost any other animal. Some can survive temperatures of −273 °C (−459 °F), close to absolute zero,[5] temperatures as high as 151 °C (304 °F), 1,000 times more radiation than other animals,[6] and almost a decade without water.[7] In September 2007, tardigrades were taken into low Earth orbit on the FOTON-M3 mission and for 10 days were exposed to the vacuum of space. After they were returned to Earth, it was discovered that many of them survived and laid eggs that hatched normally.


Awesome, you proved that life which evolved on earth can survive on earth. WOW, i hope you apply for a Nobel Price.

Go read what i said again slowly, what makes you think that life which evolved ON ANOTHER PLANET, under different circumstances, could even survive here? They could breath methane and exhale oxygen for all we know. Obviously you didn't understand, or attempt to understand, what I said, in your rush to be a contraryian.

you actually used the organisms I was talking about to prove yourself wrong. Amazing. Like I said, we're finding life, Tardigrades, surviving in thought to be inhospitable conditions. They are still earth born organisms. No ones debating if life could some how survive space travel, i'm fairly convinced that's how life got a kick start on earth.

There's no reason to think that alien life would be anything close to us, in physiology or any other factors. In fact, most scientists will tell you to expect the unexpected, we'll probably find life out there, but it will bear little resemblance to us.

Wanna call my education into question again? go for it.
edit on 16-3-2011 by phishyblankwaters because: (no reason given)





i was wondering if anyone knew if there are any plants that are in fact alien plants from another planted/dimension.


Maybe you should have been more specific in your question, are you asking if it's possible somewhere out there, or are you asking if they are here on earth?
edit on 16-3-2011 by phishyblankwaters because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:53 PM
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The Saguaro cactus is one of the few, if not the only plant that doesn't follow the Fibonacci sequence in it's growth pattern. Could be that it is alien as well.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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Originally posted by DJM8507
Salvia divinorum is thought to be an alien plant... The Mythology surrounding it also is interesting... A Gift from the "God(s)" supposedly? hrmm...


I plan on trying Salvia Divinorum. My friend tried it and he thought the trash can was on fire lmfao



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:56 PM
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Originally posted by phishyblankwaters
reply to post by Darkk
 



Tardigrade


The most convenient place to find tardigrades is on lichens and mosses. Other environments are dunes, beaches, soil, and marine or freshwater sediments, where they may occur quite frequently (up to 25,000 animals per litre). Tardigrades often can be found by soaking a piece of moss in spring water.[4] Tardigrades are able to survive in extreme environments that would kill almost any other animal. Some can survive temperatures of −273 °C (−459 °F), close to absolute zero,[5] temperatures as high as 151 °C (304 °F), 1,000 times more radiation than other animals,[6] and almost a decade without water.[7] In September 2007, tardigrades were taken into low Earth orbit on the FOTON-M3 mission and for 10 days were exposed to the vacuum of space. After they were returned to Earth, it was discovered that many of them survived and laid eggs that hatched normally.


Awesome, you proved that life which evolved on earth can survive on earth. WOW, i hope you apply for a Nobel Price.

Go read what i said again slowly, what makes you think that life which evolved ON ANOTHER PLANET, under different circumstances, could even survive here? They could breath methane and exhale oxygen for all we know. Obviously you didn't understand, or attempt to understand, what I said, in your rush to be a contraryian.

you actually used the organisms I was talking about to prove yourself wrong. Amazing. Like I said, we're finding life, Tardigrades, surviving in thought to be inhospitable conditions. They are still earth born organisms. No ones debating if life could some how survive space travel, i'm fairly convinced that's how life got a kick start on earth.

There's no reason to think that alien life would be anything close to us, in physiology or any other factors. In fact, most scientists will tell you to expect the unexpected, we'll probably find life out there, but it will bear little resemblance to us.

Wanna call my education into question again? go for it.
edit on 16-3-2011 by phishyblankwaters because: (no reason given)


I edited my post for some reason it was cut off, those things can survive in space and many other places. Why all the hostility?



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 01:00 PM
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science fact; there is no such thing as wild corn. no one has ever seen or found wild corn. all the corn we have today descended from domesticated corn in meso-America.

some think corn descended from teosinte but recent genetic research concludes corn and teosinte are cousins.
(source; Wikipedia, among others)

something to consider; many myths and religions suggest that in man's infancy superior beings guided and taught early man (Prometheus syndrome). if you believe in outside help, perhaps 'someone'/something engineered or brought in corn.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by works4dhs
 


That is odd, i never knew that.
What is maize?
edit on 16-3-2011 by Darkk because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by coyotepoet
The Saguaro cactus is one of the few, if not the only plant that doesn't follow the Fibonacci sequence in it's growth pattern. Could be that it is alien as well.




That's very interesting.....Where did you find that little tidbit?? It's an interesting anomaly if TRUE!



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 01:11 PM
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Originally posted by Darkk
reply to post by works4dhs
 


That is odd, i never knew that.
What is maize?
edit on 16-3-2011 by Darkk because: (no reason given)



Pretty sure thats the spanish or native? name for corn.



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