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The Fukushima 50: Not afraid to die...

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posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:08 AM
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CBS news story



Although communication with the workers inside the nuclear plant is nearly impossible, a CBS News consultant spoke to a Japanese official who made contact with one of the 50 inside the control center. The official said that his friend, one of the Fukushima 50, told him that he was not afraid to die, that that was his job.


My heart goes out to these brave 50, words cannot express such bravery, much like the bravery shown by the firefighters and officers on 9/11. I pray that their efforts are not in vain.

I felt i should bring attention to this, i don't seem to see much about it on the MSM




posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:11 AM
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Fukushima 50 already are world heroes and they will stay in world history forever .
Some note .... they are approx 180 ..working in shifts ..



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:17 AM
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Dying for your country...... you're doing it right!



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:20 AM
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in my religion only muslims going to heaven. so arent they deserve? i cant understand this point..



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:21 AM
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A small crew of technicians, braving radiation and fire, became the only people remaining at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on Tuesday — and perhaps Japan’s last chance of preventing a broader nuclear catastrophe. They crawl through labyrinths of equipment in utter darkness pierced only by their flashlights, listening for periodic explosions as hydrogen gas escaping from crippled reactors ignites on contact with air. They breathe through uncomfortable respirators or carry heavy oxygen tanks on their backs. They wear white, full-body jumpsuits with snug-fitting hoods that provide scant protection from the invisible radiation sleeting through their bodies. They are the faceless 50, the unnamed operators who stayed behind. They have volunteered, or been assigned, to pump seawater on dangerously exposed nuclear fuel, already thought to be partly melting and spewing radioactive material, to prevent full meltdowns that could throw thousands of tons of radioactive dust high into the air and imperil millions of their compatriots. They struggled on Tuesday and Wednesday to keep hundreds of gallons of seawater a minute flowing through temporary fire pumps into the three stricken reactors, Nos. 1, 2 and 3. Among the many problems they faced was what appeared to be yet another fire at the plant.


www.patheos.com...




edit on 16-3-2011 by xavi1000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:22 AM
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Originally posted by aytacaksel
in my religion only muslims going to heaven. so arent they deserve? i cant understand this point..


that's a tough one, and one of religions major flaws.... it's not all inclusive, for all the good people



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by PoorFool
Dying for your country...... you're doing it right!



They are sacrificing themselves for the whole world ... not just Japan .. my God .. the amount of pressure on their heads must be unbelieveable .. all while subjecting themselves to lethal radiation ... truely a suicide mission ..



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:24 AM
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It is sad. I never had any doubts that the workers would handle it any other way. Japanese culture is amazing and mark my words, these 50 will be immortalized by a monument when this disaster is finally over.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by xavi1000
 


I cant imagine what its like, doing all of this, knowing that this invisible thing is basically eating away at your protection



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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May God bless them.

I heard this morning that radiation levels in the plant are too high for humans to be present, and these brave people stayed behind in the hope that they will be able to prevent the further spread or total release of contaminants saving their family, their country, etc.

True heroes.
edit on 16-3-2011 by searching4truth because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:25 AM
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I sincerely hope that whatever the outcome of the current disaster, the families of these heroes are looked after and want for nothing. These men should be given property wherever they want to retire to and live like lords for the rest of their (probably considerably shortened) lives
I applaud their bravery, Heroes every one of them



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:27 AM
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True heroes. Lets hope their efforts aren't in vain, and should they die, they spare other innocent lives at the expense of their own.

Our prayers go out to them.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by FreeSpeaker
 


If i remember correctly, its called Bushido, or the warriors way. which is about loyalty, honor, obedience, duty, filial piety, and self-sacrifice.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:31 AM
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I hadn't forgotten those people working at the plant even when the media stopped reporting their presence.

My thoughts go out to them, and all they have sacrificed.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Kingbreaker
 


Yes those were my thoughts exactly. Brave warriors laying down their lives in the battle to control this danger. Respect and thanks is all I have to say to them. I just wish there was a safer way, to create power that we need.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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Originally posted by Kingbreaker
reply to post by FreeSpeaker
 


If i remember correctly, its called Bushido, or the warriors way. which is about loyalty, honor, obedience, duty, filial piety, and self-sacrifice.


You are correct. When you compare a disaster like Katrina with what happend in Japan, the differences in how the population handled it is staggering. In Katrina we had looting, murders, rapes, people going insane to say the least. You will not see this in Japan and that says alot about the greatness of their culture.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:37 AM
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Yup, they have a set.

It can't be said too many times. These men are true heroes. I salute them.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:39 AM
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No. At all and any cost must the radiation levels be brought down. There can be NO stopping it even if there is only1% of a chance at it. Never tell mankind the odds, for we as a civilisation had survive such odds before. It's the courage to try and do our best.

I appeal to all to write in to your authorities to allow and press that the contamination fight to continue. Those that whom are not willing be allowed to go home. There would be NO lack of INTERNATIONAL VOLUNTEERS to do the job. The insignificant and nobody me would be the first to go, not for my own glory, death wish or anything else. Simply only because there are millions of other precious human lives than the single mine at stake.

And I know that I will not be alone, for there are many like me, whom is ready to lay down my lives for others.

Many have fears, but have yet to comprehend REAL physical pain, even 5 minutes worth of it. I had been in the military service before and know what is real pain and how to handle it.

For example, imagine yourself tied up and was told that your fingernails will be pluck out one by one. There mere thought of it will bring shivers down your spine, and as each minute passes as you watch your torturer bring the pliers to your fingers, you die a thousand deaths with each passing second, for your fears made you scream at the presume pain it will bring, as the nails are close to your nerve cells.

But the technique to handle pain is to SHIFT your focus to something else. Throw your mind into a virtual world, and focus upon it so that you will not feel even the slightest pain. It works, for our minds are the most powerful weapon on Earth.

It is brains, and not brawns, that help you survive, to continue on, in most dire circumstances. Properly trained, even without hands and legs, as long as the mind is still alive, a worthy mission can still be carried out.

And there should be no illusions on the mission to control the radiation levels. One will be subject to such dangerous levels that life will be impossible over time. Our human bodies cannot take it. But it will only be mine, for if the contamination is not stop, more will die.

My request are two. One is that I remain annonymous, leaving no pic or name for my volunteerism. I need no hero worship. When my body is fully contaminated and cannot work, give me euthanesia, save on medical costs,dump my body into a toxic waste bin and throw it into the deepest ocean, to be forgotten. I came with nothing in this life and will leave with nothing anyway.

Secondly, that my death be not in vain as the atomic agencies be more responsible instead of corporate responsible, never to allow nuke energy be build in the ring of fire. Today, I am ready to give up my life, but let it not be allowed that any other human need to do what I am willing to do, for each life is precious. Mankind must NEVER make the same mistake twice.

Thus my plea to appeal to the authorities and allow international volunteers instead. There are many of our fellow brothers and sisters willing to take that responsibility to save humanity, rather than to just let the radiation levels go uncheck without doing anything.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 11:41 AM
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These women and men who have put themselves in danger in their valiant efforts to save Japan are truly courageous. I can't bear to think how much damage has already been inflicted on them. My thoughts and prayers go out to these brave heroes and heroines.




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