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NASA: Japan Quake shortend the length of days on Earth

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posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by Davian
 


Interesting, because I think I'm reading a post RIGHT NOW...YOURS, that is using the idea of FEAR to steer away traffic from this thread.


If they don't think like you, look like you, say all the things that you are saying, and act like you...then they must be FEAR MONGERING.

I use information like this to increase my awareness, not fear monger...there's a difference.

Just an observation.




posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:30 PM
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Some 1500 years from now we're all going to be wondering where that missing second went.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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Everyone keeps saying that an earthquake moving the coast is SO rare...how do we know this? Seismologists, geologists, scientists in general don't know...we have only been studying earthquakes and such in depth for less than 200 years. We have no idea what has went on in the past, this could actually be extremely common with earthquakes with a large magnitude.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 11:40 PM
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Originally posted by tmar11
Everyone keeps saying that an earthquake moving the coast is SO rare...how do we know this? Seismologists, geologists, scientists in general don't know...we have only been studying earthquakes and such in depth for less than 200 years. We have no idea what has went on in the past, this could actually be extremely common with earthquakes with a large magnitude.


Star for that post, because it seems like the only logical one in this thread!

But I guess people here know the geologic history of the earth millions of years into the past, which gives them the required information to actually make a judgment of this being normal or not.

Everybody think to yourself for a minute, and ask if anybody knows if this is actually common or not? Unless you are some sort of time traveler the answer is going to be no, you don't know. Which means you cannot have an accurate idea of if this is "normal" or "common"

Which is funny, because people on both sides of the fence are quick to insult the other side, when in fact neither knows what they are talking about.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 12:27 AM
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I knew there was a reason that I wasn't getting everything done that needed to be done in the last several days.


There's not enough time in a day!


Thanks NASA! This explains it all.



posted on Mar, 16 2011 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
reply to post by thruthseek3r
 


That's easy, 0.657 seconds.

It will take 91 years and almost 4 months for a one minute difference, so I'm not worried about it.


PS: I may be wrong in my calculations.


I'm not so worried even if it should be considered knowing the earthquake was 8.9 to 9.1 ( so many different datas ).

Thanks to you for the answer anyway.



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by thruthseek3r
Considering 1.8 microsecond less in every day how much day time will we loose in an entire year?


1.8 microseconds = .0000018

.0000018 X 365.25 days = .00065745 seconds lost in one year

1/.00065745 = 1521.028

Just over 1521 years to equal one second in time lost.


edit on 17-3-2011 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2011 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Erongaricuaro
 


I said my calculations could be wrong.


Thanks for accurate calculations.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:37 AM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


No one has seemed to catch my earlier reference to 1500 years except to think I was being smart-alec. I meant that to imply more. It is amazing we can measure the variances of our days with this kind of accuracy now.

We really don't know how many of these slow-downs we've had over time, or speed-ups if such exists, because I would guess it has not been long that we have had the technology in place to measure 1 second over 1500 years difference in the length of our day.

To roughly adjust our calendars we have a leap year every four years. Then at the turn of the century we skip a leap year, except at the millenial year when we don't skip the century leap year. It makes me wonder how accurate we are at the moment?? Somewhere down the millenias we will have to account for this and other missing time, perhaps. Or maybe we will have some other events that effect our day the other way. Or is it enough to make a difference to us?



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:41 AM
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1.8 milliseconds? I'm all for seeing the bigger picture, but even after that calculation shows 1.8 milliseconds can be worth a thousand years... I have a hard time rationalizing a reason to see anything serious about this. That's a blip in time you don't even notice.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 02:52 AM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
reply to post by ArMaP
 


No one has seemed to catch my earlier reference to 1500 years except to think I was being smart-alec. I meant that to imply more. It is amazing we can measure the variances of our days with this kind of accuracy now.


We can't.

It is a theoretical calculation based on the effects of ground movement. Analogous to a spinning skater pulling in their arms. Conservation of angular momentum means the rotation speeds up.



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 03:06 AM
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2004 earthquake also shortened the day


This isn't the first time a massive earthquake has changed the length of Earth's day. Major temblors have shortened day length in the past.

The 8.8-magnitude earthquake in Chile last year also sped up the planet's rotation and shortened the day by 1.26 microseconds. The 9.1 Sumatra earthquake in 2004 shortened the day by 6.8 microseconds.

And the impact from Japan's 8.9-magnitude temblor may not be completely over.The weaker aftershocks may contribute tiny changes to day length as well.

edit on 21-3-2011 by ahimsa because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by Sahabi

What I find interesting is that Islam prophesied that during the last days the length of days would shorten.

I'm not saying to subscribe to Islam, I'm just attentive that the shortening of time is correlated with the "last days."

I don't mean to fear-monger. If one clears their conscious, and opens their heart to global love, forgiveness, and understanding then there is nothing to fear.

Peace.



It's prophesied in the Bible too.



edit on 21-3-2011 by ahimsa because: I don't know how to quote just part of a post...

edit on 21-3-2011 by ahimsa because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Mar, 21 2011 @ 03:55 AM
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I've read before that earthquakes shorten the length of days. The 2004 Indonesian earthquake apparently shortened the day by -2.676 microseconds (www.uwgb.edu...), and there are many large earthquakes all the time...


Note this is a calculation, not an observation. What it means is the day became shorter by 0.0000027 seconds (Great - I don't have enough time as it is!). It will take about 1,000 years for that to throw the earth out of sync with clocks by one second, and other things like tidal friction will have much greater effects.



posted on Mar, 26 2011 @ 10:58 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



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