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A question to ponder;

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posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:28 AM
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Hello ATS

I have a question about Japan's nuclear emergency situation...

But first, let me begin by stating that Chernobyl's reactor containers were said not to have been constructed using steel, or something to that effect, and these ones in Japan have been constructed using steel. The point is; it is presumed that Japan is in a better way than Chernobyl ever was. Specifically, as purported by MSM; containing the disaster of a melt-down is more feasible in Japan, given that it's reactors have steel construction.

Are you following me?

My question; during a melt-down, how is it feasible that this steel will not also melt?

I ask out of concern not only for myself as I live on Oregon's coast, but with respect to the Japanese quality of life.

I pray the Lord's will be done.




posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:31 AM
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reply to post by loveguy
 


Must be special steel, huh ?

The Trade Centres were made of steel, weren't they ?

And didn't that steel melt ?



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by Dock9
reply to post by loveguy
 


Must be special steel, huh ?

The Trade Centres were made of steel, weren't they ?

And didn't that steel melt ?


It's funny you mention that, as I have previously edited that fact out of OP!



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:45 AM
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i cant claim to know much about nuclear reactors or what they are made of. i would assume that a NUCLEAR meltdown would be much hotter than the melting point of steel which is about 2,500 degrees farenheit. 1,350 some celsius. not sure if anyone knows how hot a nuclear reactor gets at its meltdown point. All kidding aside. I do agree that japan is probably screwed right now. I do not however think it will have as much of an affect on the US as they claim. Just doesnt seem reasonable.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:50 AM
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Chernoble di dnot have containment vesels. These are steel presure vesels surrounding the the radioactive core. This means that when the system went pop there was nothing to contain the radiation, hence big problem.

The Japanese systems do have steel containment vesels. However, these will melt/just blow up in the event of a full meltdown.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 02:52 AM
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Originally posted by iheartprplkoolaid
I do not however think it will have as much of an affect on the US as they claim. Just doesnt seem reasonable.


Tones of nuclear material in the atmosphere will be at least as bad for the US - and the reast of the world, as they say. Probably worse than they say.
edit on 15-3-2011 by Shamatt because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 04:10 AM
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reply to post by Shamatt
 


so does all this material get into the atmosphere when a nuke is set off? or is that different... sorry i have no clue how this will effect the world. just seems that japan is so small and far away. cant see this making that big of an impact.



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 05:41 AM
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Originally posted by iheartprplkoolaid
reply to post by Shamatt
 


so does all this material get into the atmosphere when a nuke is set off? or is that different... sorry i have no clue how this will effect the world. just seems that japan is so small and far away. cant see this making that big of an impact.


When a nuke goes off, something called a nuclear chain reaction has occurred. The nuclear chain reaction produces various radioactive isotopes, such as iodine-131, strontium-90, caesium-137, and others. These particles can also bond with soil and other materials on the ground during a thermonuclear event. These radioactive materials are called nuclear fallout, and they range in size from nanometers to millimeters in diameter which allows them to be easily carried by air currents and dispersed over wide distances.

In a nuclear detonation, fallout is injected into the atmosphere by the blast. In a nuclear meltdown, fallout is injected into the atmosphere by steam and explosions. Fallout becomes hazardous in great environmental qualities, by external exposure (when it is on a person's clothes or skin, or when it covers surfaces with which the person has contact or is near to) and internal exposure (when it is inhaled, drunk in contaminated milk or water, or consumed on or in contaminated foods).



posted on Mar, 15 2011 @ 07:29 AM
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Originally posted by iheartprplkoolaid
reply to post by Shamatt
 


so does all this material get into the atmosphere when a nuke is set off? or is that different... sorry i have no clue how this will effect the world. just seems that japan is so small and far away. cant see this making that big of an impact.


Have a look at a map, find Japan, run your fiinger due East and after a lot of sea you will bump into the West coast of the USA. Which is pretty much what could happen to tones of nuclear fallout from the little Japanese reactor which is so so far away. It gets up into the atmosphere, is carried by the wind, and then falls on your head.

bluestarchronicles.com...



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