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The Vanishing Imam: The mysterious disappearance of Musa al-Sadr

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posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 09:47 AM
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The Vanishing Imam: The mysterious disappearance of Musa al-Sadr



This is something I’ve actually never once seen being discussed here on ATS (surprising given almost everything else is). I even did a search for it specifically for the name Musa al-Sadr (as they seemed most relevant) for thread titles also and absolutely nothing came up. (I did one for a general board search and I found one result not related to his disappearance as well)

So, hopefully I'm bringing a new conspiracy theory to the boards with this thread here.


Anyway, with the recent events taking place in the middle east, Libya in particular, I thought I would do some research on Colonel Gaddafi given that I know very little about him, his achievements, his character and so on. He’s a figure who's peak is seemingly beyond my time you see. Upon my research on him though I inadvertently came across what is an interesting story to say the least about the Shia Leader, Musa al-Sadr and his quite suspicious (perhaps convenient) disappearance in August, 1978.

Bizarrely, he hasn't ever been seen since this odd disappearance - one whom has caused something of a large dispute between the 2 countries involved (Lebanon & Libya). Well, He hasn't been seen apart from some very few sightings of him, the most recent of which actually a couple of weeks ago towards the end of February, 2011. More on this later though.

Admittedly this is something of a new story to me in all honesty, perhaps It's different for others here, I hope so anyway, but in writing this thread I hope to understand a little bit better if not at the very least peak the interest of others for this peculiar incident also.

That being so, here's a little bit of background into Musa Al-Sadr: Sadr, I believe, was born in Iran on the 15th, March, 1928 to a family of theologians, He eventually moved to the Iranian capital Tehran, from Qom, where he was to receive his degree in Islamic Jurisprudence (Fiqh) and Political Sciences from Tehran University in 1956.

Afterwards deciding to move back to Qom to continue studies, primarily on Theology and Islamic philosophy under Allamah Muḥammad Ḥusayn Ṭabaṭabāaī. Eventually he left Qom for Najaf to study theology under Ayatollah Muḥsin al-Ṭabāṭabā'ī al-Ḥākim and Abū l-Qāṣim Khū'ī.



By 1960 Musa al-Sadr had accepted an invitation to become the leading Muslim Shi'ite figure in the Lebanese southern city of Tyre, his family and himself originally coming from Lebanon It wasn't much of a surprising decision. He seemingly then became known by the name Imām Mūsá. It was then shortly before the beginning of the next decade he was appointed the very first head of the Supreme Islamic Shi'ite Council, proving more say in the government. Perhaps a motive for his disappearance? Anyway..,

For the next four years afterwards, he controversially engaged the leadership of the Syrian ‘Alawīs in what was an attempt at unifying political power with that of the Twelver Shī‘ah. It was In July 1973 he and the ‘Alawī religious leadership successfully appointed an ‘Alawī as an official mufti to the Twelver community.

In 1974 he had founded the Movement of the Disinherited to press for better economic and social conditions for the Shī‘ah, seemingly using his new found governmental influence. In doing so, he established schools, hospitals, various medical clinics and actually did the world some good. Many of these buildings are still present today in southern Lebanon in fact. The civil war occurred shortly after this though, something Sadr was said to have gone to great lengths to helping avoid.

Sadr was, as far as I could tell, somewhat of an active figure in the war, not on the front line though of course. Instead in regards to prevention. he at first aligned himself with the Lebanese National Movement, and the Movement of the Disinherited whom developed an armed wing known as Afwāj al-Muqāwamat al-Lubnāniyyah, better known as Amal. Withdrawing his support come 1976 though, presumably due to the Syrian invasion on the side of the Lebanese Front.

It was shortly after this, that he was to then disappear though seemingly without a trace. Many placing the blame right in Colonel Gaffafis hands of all people. Let me explain..



The Imams mysterious disappearance: It all stems from August 1978 when Sadr and two of his companions (Sheikh Mohamad Yaacoub and journalist Abbas Badreddine) were visiting Libya. Now, I must stress at this point, much information is hard to come buy, but from what I did find, It seems that the "trio" was staying at the "Shate' Hotel" in Tripoli. And witnesses report that they actually saw the Imam, alongside his 2 companions leave this hotel in an official convoy on the 31st of August, the date set for their meeting with Gaddafi.

Official meaning I could only assume, It was organized by Gaddafis government, not to forget the meeting they (Sadr & Gaddafi) were supposed to have was on this day also. None of this seemingly mentioned in any of the media outlets here also.

They were meeting after Sadr flew to Libya from Beirut commemorating Libya's Muammar Gaddafi's ascent to power in 1969. Some say Gaddafi saw him as a religious rival thus deciding to having him killed.

From what else I found Gaddafi has completely denied the meeting had ever taken place, despite alleged reports (Which I can't seem to locate) specifically confirmed the date was set was on the 31st of August at 1:00pm. (Although seeing Gaddafi in recent times denying almost everything thrown at him It begs the question, why should/would we believe him? Just curious..)

The same reports (according to the article I'm using here) says that the meeting did in fact take place and It was here that the deep differences between the 2 individuals (Gaddafi & Sadr) were surfaced. Differences involving the Lebanese crisis currently taking place. Again, It was this day that Sadr and his 2 companions were never to be seen or heard from again.

Libyan authorities claimed that Sadr, Yaacoub and Badreddine had actually left Tripoli for Rome though. The investigation that was then set up by Lebanese sources afterwards confirmed that the 3 men haven't ever checked into Italy. Rome itself undertaking two rounds of investigations into the case and authorities concluded that Libyan claims were nothing but "baseless" and Sadr or his 2 companions never setting foot here.

Sadr's own son however claims that he (Musa Al-Sadr) remains secretly in jail, perhaps to this day, in Libya but unfortunately hasn't provided any proof of these claims as far as my research goes.



Libya reportedly refused to acknowledge the investigations findings as well as any claims made.

Lebanon even deciding to going as far as taking legal action on the 30th of August 2001. And in 2008 Indicting Gaddafi. (see below)

On 27 August 2008, Gaddafi indicted in Lebanon for al-Sadr's disappearance.


It is widely believed in Lebanon that Sheikh Moussa Sadr, who was revered locally, was kidnapped and killed on the orders of senior Libyan officials.

Libya has always denied involvement and says the sheikh left the country safely on a plane bound for Rome.

Col Gaddafi is accused of conspiring to kidnap and false imprisonment.

The charges carry the death penalty, but correspondents say it is highly unlikely that Col Gaddafi will ever stand trial in Lebanon.
(Source)

To this day in fact Sadr's disappearance continues to be a dispute between Lebanon and Libya. A Lebanese Parliament Speaker - Nabih Berri actually claiming that the Libyan regime are the ones responsible for his disappearance, particularly Gaddafi himself as published in a Saudi-run pan-Arab daily reported as recent as the 27th, August, 2006.

What's even more fascinating about this is that according to the Iranian General Mansour Qadar, the then head of Syrian security, Rifaat al-Assad, told the Iranian ambassador to Syria that Gaddafi was planning to kill al-Sadr also. I assume due to being a religious rival like I mentioned previously. All but speculation though of course.

Now, as the protests continue to sweep across the middle east, particularly in Libya, despite rumors Sadr had been killed, there had seemingly been alleged suspicious sightings of Sadr. Not forgetting that new sources have started coming to the forefront once more with sources telling AlArabiya.net that the Shiite imam is none other than still alive in a Libyan prison. More than 25 years after his disappearance giving claims he is alive more of a voice.

Many people throughout the years always holding this viewpoint too as marches have occured I believe in the Imams honour asking the Libyan government to finally release him.



It has even been claimed by a Libyan opposition activist - Mr. Sami Al Masrati - that the Imam Musa Al- Sadr is still alive as well. Eyewitnesses allegedly seeing a man "resembling" Sadr being transfered into a small aircraft and being taking to "an unknown location". Before this the Libyan opposition leader and the founder of Tabo Tribal Liberation Front Essa Abdulmajeed Mansoor had told that Imam Musa Sadr is still alive and was seen in the jail of Sabha.

It's an interesting story no doubt, and a conspiracy, as I mentioned, that isn't ever really discussed here - if ever at all. This my bringing it up for discussion and seeing the recent events concerning Libya in the news also, particularly Gaddafi's actions, I feel It's something that shouldn't really be forgotten about.

Anyway, thank you for reading. Does anyone have any thoughts or any information about this. I for one would love to hear it...




posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 09:48 AM
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Sources on the subject:

Unfortunately I couldn't find much information about this incident thus I'm forced to use Wikipedia of all things for a great deal of this thread. I'm constantly looking for more and I will post them If I find any. In the meantime, here are the ones I found, and used including wikipedia sources.

- BBC NEWS: Gaddafi charged for cleric kidnap

- WIKIPEDIA: Muammar Gaddafi

- WIKIPEDIA: Musa al-Sadr

- ASHARQ ALAWSAT: Musa al Sadr: The Untold Story Asharq Alawsat Newspaper (English)

- DESERET NEWS: Libya revolt may solve mystery of cleric's fate

edit on 5-3-2011 by Rising Against because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 09:51 AM
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lol, mofo is dead.

killed by his own people.

bet ya a buck.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 09:57 AM
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Originally posted by fooks
lol, mofo is dead.

killed by his own people.


Feel free to provide a source proving it.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:00 AM
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some iman disappears in 1978 and this affects the world, how?


he is history, i don't need to prove him dead.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by fooks
some iman disappears in 1978 and this affects the world, how?


It's a potential conspiracy. Thus my bringing it up for discussion...On a conspiracy website.


And he may not be "history" as you put it. Please read the thread, I provided reasons showing he may very well be alive, but held in captivity.



he is history, i don't need to prove him dead.


Interesting. I do have to ask though, why proclaim (in your first reply that is) that that he is dead when you have absolutely no intention of proving it? Are you trolling?
edit on 5-3-2011 by Rising Against because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:10 AM
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probably i'm the only one giving 1 crap about this.

hope you get many flags.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:13 AM
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I think the relevance of this post is that he may be the "Mehdi" - their last imam before Jesus comes for Armageddon.

I say this because he fits the bill when it comes to the ancient prophecy in the Quran.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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i was wondering what his relevance was.

will he fight the other mahdi's?



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by Ryanssuperman
 


Thanks for your post! I hope you don't mind me asking, but can you please elaborate on this quote in particular:



I say this because he fits the bill when it comes to the ancient prophecy in the Quran.


It's not an area of expertise for me admittedly and I'm intrigued to say the least. I'm sure others will be also and It would always be nice if we can eradicate any future confusion on this issue in particular as I sense It could become a strong point of discussion.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by fooks

hope you get many flags.


Trust me, I prefer an interesting and enlightening discussion instead.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 11:10 AM
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Have you looked in Ikea?

They have very long queues there I understand. Especially in the self-assembly furniture department. perhaps he went in search of a new computer desk or similar and got held up.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 12:07 PM
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reply to post by exroyalnavy
 


Ehhh, I doubt It.



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 04:24 PM
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Originally posted by Rising Against
reply to post by exroyalnavy
 


Ehhh, I doubt It.


You obviously don't shop in Ikea very often baby !!!


No seriously. until I read this thread I'd never heard of this before, but I think this is always going to remain unexplained. But interesting thread RA, and may I add, suprisingly short



x



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 09:49 PM
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I think if i was from the middle east i may understand what the muslims,christians,protestants,etc etc have in common but honestly the most close ill go is this. IS an IMAM the same thing as yhe POPE OR the DALAI-LAMA?????



posted on Mar, 5 2011 @ 10:02 PM
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me again,

not trashing your thread but you won't find many like minded people here,

we bash or defend islam.

we are stuuuuuuuupid.



i, don't have a clue what this means.

didn't a sadar just go back to iraq?



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 06:53 AM
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reply to post by fooks
 


Stop trolling please. Thanks.


Edit To Add: Some of us actually want a genuine, interesting, intelligent discussion from time to time. If you don't, feel free to leave the thread....
edit on 6-3-2011 by Rising Against because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2011 @ 07:27 AM
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reply to post by rocha123
 


Musa Al-Sadr was a huge figure as far as I'm aware. So huge in fact, Lebanon are Libya are still in a feud over this over 30 years later.




posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 02:54 AM
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Bumping this thread with some new information from yesterday that I personally found interesting:


TEHRAN - MP Kazem Jalali announced on Tuesday that the Majlis National Security Committee has formed a special committee to pursue the case of Imam Musa al-Sadr, an Iranian-born Shia cleric who mysteriously disappeared in Libya in 1978.

Taking to reporters, Jalali said the decision was made at the committee’s meeting on Tuesday.

Jalali, who is the rapporteur of the Majlis National Security and Foreign Policy Committee, added, “Given the relevant documentation, it is obvious that the bloodthirsty regime of (Libyan leader Muammar) Gaddafi abducted Imam Musa al-Sadr and jailed him. He is alive and we are pursuing the release of Imam Musa al-Sadr.”

In August 1978, al-Sadr departed for Libya with two companions to meet officials of Qadhafi’s government. They were never heard from again, and many believe they met with foul play at the hands of Qadhafi.

In August 2008, Lebanon issued an arrest warrant for Qadhafi and 11 other Libyan officials, charging them with kidnapping al-Sadr. Qadhafi was also indicted for “inciting the abduction” of the senior cleric.

Libya has denied responsibility, claiming that al-Sadr and his companions left Libya for Italy in 1978. However, many believe that al-Sadr is still alive and is being held in a secret jail in Libya.

Hezbollah has also said Libya is first and foremost responsible for al-Sadr’s disappearance.


(Link)



posted on Mar, 10 2011 @ 05:15 AM
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Well I visited Lebanon, not long time ago. And it was the day of the remembrance of the disappearance of Sadr.
In the Shiite Areas (mainly the Shiite Areas in the south of Beirut) they still fill the the roads with his pictures with slogan such as: "You will come back to lead us... or ... Punish the guilty ones.. or... we know you are alive, etc..." while in the Sunni and Christians areas:Nothing of course.
However, after many research regarding Lebanon's history: If it wasn't to the Christians living there since 2000yrs, there wouldn't be Lebanon, it would be a part of Greater Syria (which most the Muslims always preferred) or so... But the Western Media always give a complete Islamic image about the country anyway, whereas it's a beautiful mix up of religions and races where multiculturalism has succeeded somehow unlike "others".
I'm not saying this is good or bad but Sadr is not liked by all Lebanese just by most Shiite, however even if the western media always accused Qaddafi of making him disappear, the Lebanese (all of them) think the west had to do with this subject and was deeply involved in the disappearance. (All that in my humble opinion...)



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