It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Water Freezing at 34*F....is anyone else seeing this?

page: 1
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 02:43 AM
link   
I know how strange this may sound, but, I've never experienced this at any time in my life, if i have, i surely don't remember.

Last week I walk outside to get in the car, and see the windshield iced over, and of course, the door is iced over as well, I go back inside to check the temp, and it's 34*. I unthaw the car door, and then look at the street, and notice that the pool of rain water is not frozen, but it's shallow enough that it should have crystals on the outter edges.

Same thing tonight, 34*F and grass is frozen solid, the car is covered in ice, like it just got done with a load of freezing rain, pool of water and entire street is not frozen. Trees are not frozen as they should be with freezing rain. steps on the porch aren't frozen, handrail doesn't have ice on it; however, the lawn is frozen.

I live in Washington County of Oregon. anyone else in the USA ever experince this ??

Just wanted to put this up here for future reference and see if there's a pattern.




posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 02:47 AM
link   
It's most likely just a Terminator who has just arrived from the distant future to find Sawah Connor.

...


only kidding, who knows. some places can be way colder than others depending on Air Pressure, Wind, Draught, Space etc....



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 02:47 AM
link   
Well that's a strange story but I know checking the inside temp is not always the best thing to do. Reason being is that your inside temp is based off of an inside temperature, not outside lol.

If I remember correctly, scientifically speaking, the weather inside a home is always warmer due to the fact that air flow is lesser, thus causing a "heating" sensation. Most people think that covering yourself in blankets makes you warm because you have a blanket! but not really, it's the lack of oxygen under the blanket that causes you to heat up. That make sense?

Thus, while your thermostate may say 34, it can actually be closer to 20 or lower outside. Plus you have to take into accountability winds that can create an even colder state by amplifiying the freezing of dew and dampness on your car.



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 02:47 AM
link   
Forgot to factor in the wind chill?



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:10 AM
link   
It's called a ground frost. Very common in Britain to see the grass and cars covered in frost though the actual air temp is above freezing.

weatherfaqs.org.uk...

www.weatheronline.co.uk...



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by Essan
It's called a ground frost. Very common in Britain to see the grass and cars covered in frost though the actual air temp is above freezing.

weatherfaqs.org.uk...

www.weatheronline.co.uk...


mk .. but.. why wouldn't the handrails and rain pools in the street & concrete all be frozen .. ??



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:26 AM
link   

Originally posted by smthngmssnghr
Forgot to factor in the wind chill?


Wilnd Chill is only the reaction of the wind aginst the human body.. has nothing to do with temp vs the outside enviroment..



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:26 AM
link   
I would check the reliability of your thermometer.



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:26 AM
link   
reply to post by Komodo
 


Its because those things retain ambient heat from the ground, where the windshield on a car will get cold enough to allow something to freeze at a much faster rate.



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:28 AM
link   

Originally posted by Shikamaru
Well that's a strange story but I know checking the inside temp is not always the best thing to do. Reason being is that your inside temp is based off of an inside temperature, not outside lol.

If I remember correctly, scientifically speaking, the weather inside a home is always warmer due to the fact that air flow is lesser, thus causing a "heating" sensation. Most people think that covering yourself in blankets makes you warm because you have a blanket! but not really, it's the lack of oxygen under the blanket that causes you to heat up. That make sense?

Thus, while your thermostate may say 34, it can actually be closer to 20 or lower outside. Plus you have to take into accountability winds that can create an even colder state by amplifiying the freezing of dew and dampness on your car.


hmmm.. well... weatherbug, and the sign on the bank up the street both display 34*F so .. it's safe to assume that the temp is 34*F..



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by smthngmssnghr
Forgot to factor in the wind chill?



not sure how or why you got stars for that answere but your completley wrong, wind chill has absolutley no affect on waters freezing temp, windchill also does not affect inadament objects windchill ONLY affects living things.



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:29 AM
link   
Are you factoring in the wind chill?



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:30 AM
link   
The ground, and water change temperature at a pretty slow rate, they do not give up their heat easily. That is why you often get a snow storm, but nothing sticks to the ground. The windshield, that is thin with air on either side of it, changes temperature very rapidly, and quickly sheds its heat. So if you go out on the morning after a snow that did not stick, you will notice that it often sticks to the cars even though it melted on the ground.
edit on 2/23/2011 by defcon5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:54 AM
link   
reply to post by Ear-Responsible
 


you have to be kidding right? wow..............



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 03:59 AM
link   

Originally posted by Gixxer
reply to post by Ear-Responsible
 


you have to be kidding right? wow..............

Why? Because I'm not an expert on the topic? Perhaps you could enlighten us and figure out what the OP is experiencing instead of patronizing.



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 04:16 AM
link   
I don't mean to be disresspectful, but your situation here is representative just how far we are being seperatedf from basic nature.

Here on ATS that condition is more usually shown to be in a lack of understanding of how the physics of the solar system works, In need to stop now before this becomes a rant.



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 07:31 AM
link   
Different temps of freezing due to elevation? air pressure/density



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 08:42 AM
link   
reply to post by Ear-Responsible
 


no, he's surprised you made that post because other people are already trying to answer the same idea (windchill) all you had to do was read everypost in the thread, (heres a hint read the one right above where you posted that windchill idea.)


op i think its just simply that the grass and your windsheild got colder easier, while the other peices of your environment are more capable of retaining heat,

plus people need to realise thermometers realy only estimate temperature, its not unusual for them to be off a degree or 2 or 10 even if its been in the sun,

not only that but temperature varries minutely from item to item inch by inch, temperature is not a very steady measure in an environment so alive and active,

basicly op, i wouldnt consider it unusual until it starts happening at even more extremly out of sync temperatures, 2 degrees isnt enough to be significant imo

(btw op, im in oregon also, was told id get 5 inches of snow last night, didnt get a bit, did you? you are further north then me, sounds like you didnt, those lieing weather men!!!)
edit on 2/23/11 by pryingopen3rdeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 09:10 AM
link   
reply to post by Komodo
 


Water freezes at 32*F, if there was a quick drop in temperature the non-organic material your car is made out of would not absorb any moisture and therefore any that is present would be frozen or pretty darn close to it.

I woke up to -12*C (which is 10*F to you) so all in all I think that would have been a beautiful morning!



posted on Feb, 23 2011 @ 10:07 AM
link   
Just because its 34F the time you look at it doesn't mean it was not colder an hour before you went outside. Ever look outside when it starts to snow? The roads, and sidewalks don't have any snow cover like a lawn does because the grass is holding the snow above ground. I live in Washington and see this all the time. My wife's car has been freezing over the past few day's (I wake up early to go and start it for her).



new topics

top topics



 
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join