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Hackers release decrypted Stuxnet code [...]

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posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:23 PM
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Hackers release decrypted Stuxnet code [...]


www.infoworld.com

The worm, after all, has been deemed a game-changer in the world of cyberwarfare, and experts have said it's caused more damage to Iran's nuclear facilities than a pinpoint missile attack could have
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.foxnews.com
www.blogowogo.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Anonymous Has the Bomb




posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:23 PM
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I didn't see this posted already. It's also on FoxNews.com. Seems like it's not a big deal in and of itself. If I'm reading it correctly, the didn't release the compiled virus as is, but rather the source-code for it?

So, apparently it will sort-of amount to a "how to" for a whole 'nother class of viruses.



www.infoworld.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:26 PM
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PS: I like this FoxNews description of Stuxnet ...



Careful examination of the Stuxnet worm by armies of security analysts have shown it to be a cybermissile designed to penetrate advanced security systems [...]


[Emphasis added by poster]



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:29 PM
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While I don't feel all that insecure with this code in the hands of Anonymous... I'm not so sure I agree with this move. Who knows what kind of malicious intents various government agencies or corporations could end up using this for. On the lighter side, hopefully anti-virus companies will learn new ways to fight such worms.

I see where you're coming from, Anonymous. Let's just hope this was the right decision in the end...



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Which one, the one that they helped create?

Problem-Reaction-Solution



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:30 PM
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No surprise that they released the code, they already put all the other information they stole up for download, however I would be very hesitant to mess with the code because there is no assurance that they haven't modified the code to do something other than the original mission of Stuxnet. I wonder if by this release more people will be able to analyze how the virus worked and develop a better idea of its origins, could be quite interesting to see if it finally gets traced back to the original authors.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:31 PM
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It was to my knowledge, that it was designed to only work on that specific Iranian nuclear facility. If that's true then it's pretty much useless



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by Griffo
 


Its not necessarily useless, the techniques of propagation are still there in the code, so some enterprising young virus writer could very well apply the methods to a new virus with a much broader purpose and payload, the issue now is that this information could very well fuel a whole new level of sophistication in virus writing.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by Pocky
reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Which one, the one that they helped create?

Problem-Reaction-Solution


Lucky for us Obama has the internet kill switch, rite pal!


How convenient that this just came about at percicly the rite time for them to push crap thru to "protect" everyone.
x1,000



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:36 PM
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This is great news. It is much better for information like this to be out in the public. It's not like the plans for nuclear weapon where it's hard to defend against. It's just a set of instructions for breaking into computers and spreading. with those instructions decompiled and in the public domain other programmers can understand it and change OS and software code to block the propagation methods it uses.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Seems to me that having the decrypted code means having the info required to disarm the worm.

YES?



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:40 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Seems to me that having the decrypted code means having the info required to disarm the worm.

YES?


Yes!



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Having the code only means you can combat that specific version of the code, if I were to take that code and then modify it myself it would become a different strain so-to-speak and thus require further analysis before software could pick it up and protect against it.

@ goatfish

The information necessary to deal with the virus was already available to those who needed it for the purpose of updating virus definitions and creating tools, now all the script kiddies and other miscreants of the internet have access to it, so it might very well crop back up in a few months with a new purpose in life and new targets to go after, where as when the code was under supposed lock and key it wasn't going to become part of some new virus in the future unless the original authors let the cat out of the bag.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:42 PM
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If I am understanding this correctly this could have huge ramifications. Can this really have the power to 'crack' various government and military infrastructures?

Thanks



Ok, just seen Helig's post with explanation above mine

edit on 15/2/2011 by LestatG because: Question answered in advance!!




posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by Helig
reply to post by Griffo
 


Its not necessarily useless, the techniques of propagation are still there in the code, so some enterprising young virus writer could very well apply the methods to a new virus with a much broader purpose and payload, the issue now is that this information could very well fuel a whole new level of sophistication in virus writing.


It is useless.

The key exploit which allowed it to propagate was a stolen device registry key ... lets see someone get their hands on one of those.

Additionally, it was custom tailored to attack one piece of equipment. In order to replicate that, you would have to be familiar with the equipment on a level that only the design engineers would have access to.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
reply to post by EnhancedInterrogator
 


Seems to me that having the decrypted code means having the info required to disarm the worm.

YES?


I would have thought so too.

It's basically handing out the blueprint to the virus isn't it?



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by Helig
reply to post by soficrow
The information necessary to deal with the virus was already available to those who needed it for the purpose of updating virus definitions and creating tools...


Who gets to decide who the people are who need it? Is it just MS, Mcafee, Norton, and Kaspersky? Or does that list include open source software developers? If it includes open source developers (which I believe it should) then it should be in the public domain.

Current anti-virus engines can detect more than a single "strain" of a virus or worm using sophisticated fingerprinting analysis. There is always a game of catch-up being played between hackers and anti-virus companies. This release doesn't change anything except add new information into the public domain which can, and will, be used by either side.

I think it's good because all the info should be in the public domain for the people who want to protect systems no matter who they work for.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 03:53 PM
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reply to post by SirMike
 


I'm quite sure a enterprising coder could make it use a different exploit to gain access to a system, and thats what I'm trying to say; it could very well wind up being used as a framework to create further viruses with new exploits, payloads and targets, but utilizing some of the polymorphic and propagation methods that made Stuxnet as devastating to Iran's nuclear program as it was.



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 04:02 PM
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now just great! I had written a long post but my frickin iPod decided to bug and I lost everything. It's really not a good tool to surf the web...

Ok, is this confirmed? Because it could be one of their prank, like the MasterCard account numbers that were leaked and deemed as fake...Stuxnet isn't attainable by teenagers learning how to hack. Either someone provided them with the link or they are lying. China is trying to get a hand on it for a good time now...but they can? No way!

If it's true, then they are stupid at the highest point! Don't they know Stuxnet isn't a simple virus? It's a frickin WMD (Worm of Mass Destruction aha)! The repercutions of such a move would be catastrophic. Don't we have enough #? What's the purpose behind this, if any? If someone comes to understand how it is scripted, this is gonna get ugly, and I'm gonna blame it on these 12 years old kids who know nothing about geo-politics and the repercutions of such a move. Maybe they should hang out here! They would learn Obama has an internet killswitch. As much as I respected them for whatthey were first doing, I would now get rid of every single memver of this disgusting 4chan based hacker group.

As for the origins of it, aliens helped US/Israel on this. I mean, malevolent ones of course.

Damn it! Way to be idiot! Just wow...Hope it's a prank...or maybe I don't get the news exactly right...



posted on Feb, 15 2011 @ 04:04 PM
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Originally posted by Gab1159
As for the origins of it, aliens helped US/Israel on this. I mean, malevolent ones of course.


Are you seriously suggesting this? If so I'd be interested in seeing any references that support it.
edit on 15-2-2011 by goatfish because: (no reason given)



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