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What happens to the snow in the spring?

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posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


They could always use Tankers


and then sell it as Highland spring water, make a mint selling that to the tourists


On Topic... the snow around here melts down into the ground or out to sea.. helps that we sit on one of the UKs largest aquifers
plenty of storage space



edit on 23/12/10 by thoughtsfull because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Your probably right, Theres probably no such river
But it would be amazing if there was! Best form of travelling around the country easilly, Im gonna go research rivers now, Ill get back to mr spanners on wether there is such thing as this supreme english river



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by TedHodgson
 


It seems that I have to keep an eye on the Cotswolds, melting snow + heavy rain in that area did indeed cause a flood in London in 1928 as it is the source of the Thames

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posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Reet ive done my research sir, It seems that theres no direct river connecting Scotland to england but their is probably a network of canals etc, When you get down into england however its like a Massive network of rivers and canals which are all inter-connected so if there was a flood im quite sure most of england would be affected as such



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:41 PM
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I just realised that I don;t really have too much to worry about as I'm on the "good" side of the Thames Barrier.
I fell pretty sorry for those on the other side though





posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Lmao! well as long as youll be orite thats fine...



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:50 PM
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Having lived for decades in a traditional snow belt, there are two possible and distinct spring events:

The first is a quick thaw which swells rivers, floods roads, breaks through levees and drowns basement furniture..

The second is a gradual thaw in which the snow melts away slowly and all is wonderful.

In between those two distinct possibilies are thousands of variables.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


I would like you to imagine all of the snow on this area flowing into the thames.





As just mentioned, if snow is very quickly accumulated, and very quickly melted, there will be problems.

They do not appear from the stimulus of the immediate area, the generated water will come from tributaries and smaller rivers from hundreds of miles in all directions, flowing through the thames into the ocean.

Just be prepared, its nothing to giggle about and the preparations are minimal.

Get storage off the floor of the basement, invest in shelves, have food stores, water stores.

Everything could be in shambles for quite a while if the water rises too high, why not play it safe and prepare?

-G
edit on 23-12-2010 by Gradius Maximus because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-12-2010 by Gradius Maximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 04:18 PM
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There isnt enough snow anywhere in the UK to cause any real kinda flooding. Scotland has the most snow in the UK...here in my town we have alot (about 40-50cm's). The snow, when it melts, doesnt give off as much water as rain. A snow flake is far lighter than a rain drop, so it holds less moisture. It only becomes more serious when the snow in the mountains of Scotland melt rapidly, then the rivers overflow, especially if it melts due to rainfall. But building houses on the flood plain of a river will inevitably lead to trouble, as does being silly enough to buy a house on the flood plain.

If you believe a lot of the threads on here i wouldnt worry about it melting because were in a new ice age....hahahahaha...until summer atleast!

No but seriously, its due to get milder here on Boxing Day, it'll be a gradual thaw so it wont cause any problems. maybe some large puddles or the odd street flooding but nothing to write home about but i'm sure the MSM will play on it.

London had about 5" of snow on average so there wont be any worry for them, most of it has probably gone anyways.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by jrmcleod
 


Indifference to this subject will lead to a lot of 'surprised' people.

"Oh no how could this happen to us! We built a barrier!"

Your titanic will sink one day, just like everyone else's.


edit on 23-12-2010 by Gradius Maximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 05:13 PM
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well, it would seem that perhaps the British part of the UK may do ok with all this. Still I gotta wonder about the rest of Europe. I keep hearing about gobs of snow and still snowing.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 05:16 PM
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Now I don't know what to be more scared of. An ice age or Melting Snow. As long as I'm paranoid and scared of something I guess it all works out even.

Can't wait till summer hits and I have to start being scared of droughts on the first day it gets over 90.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


lol.. well, just doing my part, I guess.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 05:26 PM
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reply to post by rogerstigers
 


I think the Euro's are being a bit dramatic about it myself...I have seen snow totals of 5 inches to 15 inches. 15 is a lot...but nothing crazy.

On average I think 10 inches of snow is equal to about 2 inches of rain...so even if they had 20 inches of snow...that would be 4 inches of "rain". And that 20 inches won't all melt at once, and a lot will be evaporated instead of melted.

I don't think there will be any big problems...and I think things are being blown a bit out of proportion over across the pond.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 05:29 PM
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reply to post by OutKast Searcher
 


I think your going to have to qualify "Euros" a bit
Europe does include Switzerland, Sweden, Finland, Norway. I doubt they are that concerned about it snowing in the winter. It's just the Brits



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Rogers will have to correct me if I'm wrong. But I'm pretty sure the people in chat that have been freaking out about the snow are from Norway or Sweden...not sure though. But the Brits are freaking out as well.

Does it not usually snow there? I'm not seeing snow totals that are all that alarming.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 05:38 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Just buy some food, im not saying run around paranoid or lose sleep at night. Consider the possibility of going hungry for a week while the floods recede or until aid can be delivered.

Thats like people in California not having an emergency kit for Earthquakes. They KNOW it happens, beyond a reasonable doubt, but it doesnt happen in a while, so they say oh hey, oh well, no biggie right?

Guess what, The english channel never existed before, it was made by awesome floods. So it wont kill you to buy a few cans of salmon and a bag of rice in case the water decides to keep on coming for a season.

I mean geez, Its nothing but DENY DENY DENY DEBUNK! DEBUNK! then Oh crap! Its here!

Possibilities my friends...the possibilities...Thats what has saved the human spieces, we can plan ahead, we can imagine what may happen most of the time. lets imagine that this could happen and be prepared!

-G
edit on 23-12-2010 by Gradius Maximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 08:51 PM
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If the ground is frozen, when snow melts there would be runoff into the rivers along with evaporation. If the ground is not frozen you'd get some runoff, some absorption into the ground and some evaporation. The best bet would be to stand up on a hill and just see what happens for your self unless you like kayaking and white water.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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Just to put this in a little perspective.

Here is the view of the terrifying Arctic conditions outside my window at the moment (this is unsalted grass)



The Horror



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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I live in Fargo, ND and we get a "100-year" flood pretty much every spring...it's ridiculous and we really need to do something about it.

Every year I hear stories (there was just one today in the newspaper) about our current snowfall and the previous years' snowfall at this time and how it compares and what we can expect in the spring... It's always hyped... The Red River here usually reaches levels over the flood stage and the people near the river suffer. It's sad for them, and I know some of them, but they chose to live there.

Anyway, yes, the snow melts, and sometimes there is a lot of it. Here, there is often a lot of it. It all comes down to how quick we thaw in the spring. If it's a quick melt that's when the problems occur.




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