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What happens to the snow in the spring?

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posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:16 PM
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So being in Texas and in relatively mild weather (for now) I may be way off base with this, still the question has stuck in my mind... With all of the record and unusual snow fall in Europe, is this a crisis waiting to happen in the spring when all of this snow melts?

Do the affected areas have enough drainage to support the melt or are they facing epic floods and water born diseases?




posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:20 PM
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It melts?



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by Whereweheaded
It melts?


*smirk* yeah, that's kinda my point.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:26 PM
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reply to post by rogerstigers
 


I like how the user Just read the title and thought thed be straight in with a sarcastic comment, Happens all the time on Ats lol But then got burned


Yep when it melts Rivers are gonna rise etc, Happens all the time when the snow comes and goes



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:28 PM
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I'm not in Europe so I don't KNOW the answer. If it melts gradually though, like if there are periodic warm spells, maybe it won't be an issue. I would be prepared for flooding though if I lived there, just in case.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by TedHodgson
 


Just exactly how did i get burned? if someone is going to ask a really stupid question about what happens to snow, they deserve a smart ass response. Remember, " deny ignorance". And asking what happens to snow when it gets warm out, and not using common sense about where the run off is going to go is little dumb dont ya think?



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:32 PM
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reply to post by Whereweheaded
 


heh, my question wasn't stupid. My title may have been, but that's the only way to get people to read the threads.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by Whereweheaded
 


Have you read the post at all?! Even now, Thats why He "Smirked" in response to your post, he quite clearly knows that it melts and he states this fact in his post, He was questioning whether it would cause flooding or not.
Your response is a typical Quick to the mark post in response to the thread title Under the assumption that the User is Posting a stupid question In the absence of you reading any of the thread itself.
Both me and the Rogerstigers both know you were burned and theres no point in arguing that fact

edit on 23/12/10 by TedHodgson because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:34 PM
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Come on guys..

Lighten up a little

Stay on topic and and don't get so easily offended when someone makes a lighthearted joke

Semper



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Ill be quiet Now
But youve gotta to admit some poeple are a bit quick to the mark somtimes



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:37 PM
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When it happens here, there's usually a flood. Unless, that is, they manage to lower the water level on the rivers with the dams.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:39 PM
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Lets just say, London might be in for another big surprise in the spring.

All of a sudden Scotland highlands are a good idea.





posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:42 PM
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It all depends on how fast it melts. Up here, it's often measured in feet of snow, but if it melts slowly the tree roots just take up the excess. Some evaporates, some goes down into the water table and aquifiers.

If the melt is really fast, then you have flood problems, sometimes. It all depends on how much the ground can handle at the time.



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Thanks mod. My comments were in good fun. People are so easily offended....geez



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by Gradius Maximus
 


Most of the snow has melted already in London over the past couple of days.

I know that my friend in New Hampshire always gets a bit flooded when the snow thaws, she does live near quite a big mountain though and there is a LOT of snow



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by Whereweheaded
 


Here's a link, and its mathematical equation can be a bit confusing, but it shows the abstract and the results of snow evaporation. And its percentages.

source: www.iwaponline.com...



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Surely you dont think the floods occur on winter solstice?

Wait until spring, when the 'real' snow up in the highlands begins melting in its entirety.

Not when London throws down salt and sand and the sun shines bright for a few days.

It wouldnt be a bad idea to at least buy an inflatable boat and have a bag of canned goods in the house just in case things get ugly. I'd hate to see anyone SOL.


-G
edit on 23-12-2010 by Gradius Maximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Gradius Maximus
 


How does water from the North of Scotland make it down to the South of England?



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


Rivers?



posted on Dec, 23 2010 @ 03:27 PM
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Originally posted by TedHodgson
reply to post by davespanners
 


Rivers?


Well thats fair enough I suppose.

Is there a river that connects the top of the UK to the bottom? I don't think I have heard of it if there is. Don't they go out to sea before that?

I'm pretty sure London doesn't flood because of melting snow in Scotland. I guess I'm willing to be proved wrong though. I though I would have noticed this phenomenon before now, like in the other years that it snowed



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