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[Very Important] Coica Passed & Federal Seizure of Websites has Begun

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posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 07:15 PM
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Perhaps they'll just pay you a little visit, and take care of the problem that way.


Originally posted by Prime-Vector
reply to post by freesprite
 


haha, the can't seize something they dont have control over. I own my server, I am my own domain registar, they have 0 access to my domain registar accounts. The worse they can do is DDOS Me, which will never work since my proxies will keep them running around in circles for days.





posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 07:19 PM
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Fellow ATS'ers, you ain't seen nothing yet. Wait till they pull the plug of the www. When that day comes (i hope not though), it's going to create an interesting and volatile situation that will be remembered as the worst mistake ever made in the history of the US of A. Just my 2 cents



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 07:19 PM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy
reply to post by YouAreDreaming
 


Don't put words in my mouth, I never referred to anyone as idiots. Just that is was foolish to instantly connect the "seizure" of websites (there was no seizure, only injunction upon those sites and domain) to that of censorship of sites that reside upon the access of the Internet.


Fair enough. We do have to watch and see what happens with this new policy. As it stands, it's not threatening free-speech on the internet. Certainly what Jay Rockerfeller is pushing for will (if successful).


Originally posted by ownbestenemy
I also do not trust most of what the Government puts out via Congress, no matter the party. I do not though, instantly label things until I gain an understanding. That is why I posted what I posted. So until that bill is changed, it remains quite specific in the types of sites and domains it will be aggressive towards. None of which are sites where people 'gather' in a public square type of environment.


I agree, but now that this is in motion what are the next bills to pass, we really have to watch out because sites like this could be targets of future bills that restrict internet freedoms. This is our last vehicle of communication and liberty, we loose it then we lose a great gift from humanity.

Don't mess with my internet!



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by YouAreDreaming

I agree, but now that this is in motion what are the next bills to pass, we really have to watch out because sites like this could be targets of future bills that restrict internet freedoms. This is our last vehicle of communication and liberty, we loose it then we lose a great gift from humanity.

Don't mess with my internet!


This is from a famous quote from Gerald Celente: "When people lose everything, and have nothing else to lose, they lose it!" or something like that anyway. So, for many, internet is the "last frontier". If we lose that frontier, it might get ugly in some parts of the country. Close to 60% of the population in the US are internet addicts...



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by Whyhi
reply to post by janon
 


We're not talking about the patriot act, we're talking about online theft. Unless you have a better idea to stop people from stealing music other than shutting down the most popular sources and attempting to track said thieves...


No one here approves of bootlegging or theft. We should all respect private property and property rights.

BUT no "website" steals or sells ANYTHING! It is a portal.

Websites are private property.

COICA has not yet passed the Senate or become law.

The President is seizing property (thru DHS/ICE) with NO DUE PROCESS!

ATS is a website, no? Anyone here ever see un-credited use of others' "property?"

You are all getting the Change you Hoped for, sheep.

Look what you've done to my country!

jw



posted on Nov, 27 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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This has nothing to do with copyright at all.
Its All about Power to do what the like.

Using copyright because other ways failed them.
They can go in to your home and look for copyright stuff
or shout down web site for it.
Copyright has given them the power to do any thing.
And if THIS site has some one put a copyright film clip.
They can shout you down to.

This has nothing to do with copyright at all.
Its All about Power to do what the like.



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 02:14 AM
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Don't think this has been posted yet. List of seized websites:
torrentfreak.com...

NOW tell me they aren't abusing it.

Edit, I also came across these which may be relevant (from comments on the torrentfreak article):

Unified Root
www.unifiedroot.com...

Osiris
en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 28-11-2010 by duke396 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 11:51 AM
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Originally posted by Whyhi
reply to post by janon
 


We're not talking about the patriot act, we're talking about online theft. Unless you have a better idea to stop people from stealing music other than shutting down the most popular sources and attempting to track said thieves...


www.abovetopsecret.com...

theres a thread here that goes into your question... I do think that the government shutting down TorrentFreak is a controversial issue,




According to a report at TorrentFreak, the search engine that was shut down -- Torrent-Finder.com -- neither hosted copyrighted material nor directly linked to places where it could be found. Instead, the site opened new windows to sites that did link to file-sharing materials. "When a site has no tracker, carries no torrents, lists no copyright works unless someone searches for them and responds just like Google, accusing it of infringement becomes somewhat of a minefield," writes Torrentfreak, "Unless you’re ICE Homeland Security Investigations that is."


I mean Torrentfreak is passable because of where it intends, but the government can easily start closing websites that doesn't appeal to their interests since they don't need a court order or any approval. This is a gradual process, a downward spiral that will get worse and worse. Don't forget how we're in this situation to begin with and why we are so upset.




All the shut sites are now displaying a Homeland Security warning that copyright infringers can face up to five years in prison.


This answers your other question i believe.



en.wikipedia.org...

ACTA - Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, is a treaty that is to be signed by the Australia, Canada, the European Union, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, New Zealand, the Republic of Korea, Singapore, Switzerland and the United States. Though wiki merely states that these countries are negotiating about it, you can bet your ass they are going to eventually sign it. So yes, copyright infringement and internet censorship is an international, though i would call it a global, issue.



posted on Nov, 28 2010 @ 12:28 PM
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haha, the can't seize something they dont have control over. I own my server, I am my own domain registar, they have 0 access to my domain registar accounts. The worse they can do is DDOS Me, which will never work since my proxies will keep them running around in circles for days.


Actually under COICA they can shut you down, ICANN controls your domain, it controls all TLDs and through it they can take all your domains from you. Your site will remain unaffected, AFAIK under COICA it can still be reached by the server's IP address (unless you're on a shared host). The goal is to simply blacklist your domain and direct your DNS to a "seizure" page.

That's what's unsettling about COICA, it goes far beyond US jurisdiction. But then, under ICANN, a great deal of the web is under US jurisdiction. 100% of .com, .net, and .org domains are subject to seizure, and a great percentage of all other TLDs are as well. We'll have to see what arises out of this mess, perhaps an alternative to ICANN will be in the works beyond the reach of the US.
edit on 28-11-2010 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 03:56 AM
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There are alternatives in their infancy, if anyone bothered to click the links in my post. Osiris is a p2p based web portal, and Unified Root runs parallel to and separate from ICANN (requires a modified version of Firefox to access pages).



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 04:22 AM
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The government did not 'censor' these sites, they stopped online theft. Piracy of products is theft, do you not expect the theft of products to be dealt with? No censorship in this instance, move along.



posted on Nov, 29 2010 @ 04:47 AM
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I think this bill has made it more difficult for American online poker players to get their money. I haven't tried since the bill has past but after reading some of the poker forums it seems like a lot of people are having problems getting their winnings.

Our elected officials are a bunch of sellouts.



posted on Dec, 2 2010 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by YouAreDreaming
 


I do agree that it is something to maintain a watchful eye upon. But in light of how American's kept a watchful eye upon such atrocities as the Patriot Act, I fear it is futile.

It is funny because the only persons who know about these injunctions are those that maintain a constant contact with the Internet and/or those in the industry.

While I abhor theft of any kind as it deprives either an individual or group of their rightful property, I can understand the fear that this may invoke in people.



posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 05:16 AM
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Obviously, this will go well beyond copyright infringement but I expect it'll be anticlimactic. They'll handle it the same way they do everything else. Baby steps. They'll hammer a bunch of nails until people start to take notice and then fall back for a while and leave things to cool until people go back to sleep.



posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 05:44 AM
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Originally posted by space cadet
The government did not 'censor' these sites, they stopped online theft. Piracy of products is theft, do you not expect the theft of products to be dealt with? No censorship in this instance, move along.


Fundamentally, downloading a torrent isn't all that different from taping a movie off of HBO back in the day (Though admittedly, when you download, you're uploading at the same time). The movie industry was not cool at all with people doing that and yet everyone I knew who had a VCR did it anyway. How many people never bought movies simply because they could tape them and watch them over and over?

The problem is that people don't think of downloading digits as a theft. Though it technically may be, we all did it back in the day. The main difference is the movie and recording industry can actually see it happening now. They must have known someone was buying all those blank tapes.
edit on 3-12-2010 by spicypickle because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2010 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by spicypickle
 


Correct but you must include the factor that unlike copying a movie of HBO or TV or recording a song off the radio/dubbing your friends tapes, copying a friend's CD is not making that copyrighted material available to potentially millions of people in one fell swoop.

There are very cheap and affordable services that meet the demand of digital downloading (both movies and songs) that satisfy both the major industries at play here.

Think of the axiom that once people get something for free, they never want to pay for it. There are few exceptions to that.



posted on Dec, 4 2010 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by ownbestenemy
reply to post by spicypickle
 


Correct but you must include the factor that unlike copying a movie of HBO or TV or recording a song off the radio/dubbing your friends tapes, copying a friend's CD is not making that copyrighted material available to potentially millions of people in one fell swoop.


Right. BUT, HBO (and similar channels) were aware that tens of millions of people were taping movies off of their channels. Or, to put it more accurately, they were aware that there was nothing to stop it AND they were aware that it was indeed happening. Companies that sold blank tapes knew what they were being used for. Companies that sold VCRs knew what they were being used for. There was also a company that sold a simple device that would defeat Macrovision (copyright protection). Obviously, this device was deliberately designed to do this. Combined, all of these things added up to millions of people violating copyright law. To the extent to where most people didn't even look at it as a big deal.

Now I do agree that something has to be done. I don't hold artists in such contempt that I don't think they're entitled to be paid for their work. I'm just not so sure taking torrent sites down is a great thing.



posted on Dec, 4 2010 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Whyhi
 


It's not stealing if the owner of the copyright doesn't lose anything. Using words like that



posted on Dec, 4 2010 @ 06:39 PM
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reply to post by spicypickle
 


Correct and well put.

The large picture serves best to been seen.

The industries were holding onto their old business models that was allowing them to make money without worry of individuals taping a show off the television (which is of lessor quality).

When the digitalization of such shows came about and were being distributed throughout the Internet, the quality of those shows were near or just as good as getting a production copy of that movie or music.

It was at this point that the industries still maintained their old business model. Which ultimately has led to this apex.

What we are seeing though is Government intervention stepping in and protecting old business models that failed to keep up with innovative technologies and newer business models that were taking a piece of their cake. This is the same protection given to the auto companies in my opinion. Same failures, that being failed business models or outdated models.



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